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Science & Medicine - Raaga.com - A World of Music

Science & Medicine

Red Nova explosion predicted
The Science Hour BBC
access_time3 days ago
Astronomer Professor Larry Molnar and his students have made a rare prediction of when stars will explode. After an undergraduate student spotted a pulsating star, and observed the pulses getting quicker, the team claim to have calculated when the binary star system KIC 9832227 might collide creating a massive Red Nova explosion which will be visible to the naked eye in 2022, give or take a year. Whale Menopause Killer whales and humans are two of only three species that go through what we call menopause - stopping reproduction part-way through their lives. Victoria Gill joined the team observing a population of killer whales off the US Pacific coast which has helped British researchers to solve this evolutionary mystery. Quahogs Quahogs are a kind of clam and they can live for hundreds of years. Analysis of their shells provides a record of historical climate change. Researchers studying their shells have found big differences between the drivers of climate change now and in the pre-industrial era. Peat in Congo Peat is important. Made from decades of partially rotted plant material that builds up in wet conditions, this soil type is essential for locking carbon away from the atmosphere. The majority of peatland is found in cool latitudes, but scientists recently found a huge area of peat in northern Congo in Africa. Climate Change In India The result of US election in November was announced during the 2016 Marrakech UN Climate Change Conference, a meeting where most delegates were working to deliver on the promises of the previous Paris accord. Instead, a new US direction seemed to have emerged, with some in the new US cabinet going so far as to suggest the US should withdraw altogether from Paris, scrap the US's own Clean Power act, and re-open coal mines. Roger Harrabin explores whether other countries such as India might follow the Trump suit and relax their low-carbon initiatives. Stuttering Stuttering affects around 70 million people worldwide but it is a condition which is not fully understood. A new study led by Dr Jay Desai from Los Angeles Children's Hospital has found people who stutter have reduced blood flow in areas of the brain associated with language. He hopes these findings could lead to improved treatments. The Science Hour was presented by Roland Pease with comments from Victoria Gill BBC Science Reporter. Editor: Deborah Cohen Picture: Star V838 Monocerotis - A possible "red nova" explosion captured in 2002. Credit: NASA, ESA and H.E. Bond (STScI)
Season 7 Time Capsule (Part 2)
StarTalk Radio StarTalk Radio
access_time3 days ago
Join host Neil Tyson for Season 7’s final episode as he revisits our fan’s favorite Cosmic Queries shows. Along with Chuck Nice, Eugene Mirman, Iliza Shlesinger, and guests, Neil answers questions about aliens, the multiverse, black holes, war, and more.
Huge Area of Peatland Found in Congo
Science in Action BBC
access_time5 days ago
Peat is important. Made from decades of partially rotted plant material that builds up in wet conditions. This soil type is essential for locking carbon away from the atmosphere. Peatlands cover 3% of the Earth’s land cover, yet they lock up a third of the world’s carbon. The majority of peatland is found in cool latitudes. But scientists recently found a huge area of peat in northern Congo in Africa. This lowland peatland is one of just three regions found in the tropics, and locked up in its depths are clues to the past climate in a very understudied part of the world. Predicted Red Nova Astronomer Professor Laurence (Larry) Molnar at Calvin College in Seattle and his students have made a rare prediction of when stars will explode. After an undergraduate student spotted a pulsating star, and observed the pulses getting quicker, the team claim to have calculated when the binary star system KIC 9832227 might collide creating a massive Red Nova explosion which will be visible by the naked eye in the night sky in 2022, give or take a year. Science Storytelling The science of climate change is growing exponentially. No individual can hope to read every scientific paper or article on the topic. So how do they and we on Science in Action decide which pieces of work merit more attention? Unsurprisingly how well a paper is written has a huge bearing on which peer-reviewed publication warrants more of our attention. Climate change scientists should take note that; recent research into this topic has found that, papers written in a more narrative, storytelling, style make it to the top of the pile. Picture: Peat samples from the Congo, Credit: Simon Lewis Presenter: Roland Pease Producer: Fiona Roberts
Season 1 Time Capsule – StarTalk All-Stars
StarTalk Radio StarTalk Radio
access_time6 days ago
Neil Tyson celebrates the first season of StarTalk All-Stars with fan favorite episodes featuring Bill Nye and our other new hosts grappling with climate change, visualizing our universe, listening for aliens, sending human beings to Mars, and much more. NOTE: StarTalk All-Access subscribers can listen to this entire episode commercial-free. Find out more at https://www.startalkradio.net/startalk-all-access/
10/01/2017
Inside Health BBC
access_time7 days ago
Evidence suggests Paracetamol is neither as effective or safe as previously thought for chronic pain; Prostate cancer and new targeted treatments with fewer side effects plus feedback following last week's special edition; And is giving oxygen in heart attacks a help or hindrance? Margaret McCartney and Carl Heneghan debate the first in a new mini-series investigating uncertainty in medicine.
The Future of the Climate Deal
Discovery BBC
access_time8 days ago
The incoming administration of President Trump has frightened many in the international environmental community. The result of US election in November was announced during the 2016 Marrakech UN Climate Change Conference, a meeting where most delegates were working to deliver on the promises of the previous Paris accord. Instead, a new US direction seemed to have emerged, with some in the new US cabinet going so far as to suggest the US should withdraw altogether from Paris, scrap the US’s own Clean Power act, and re-open coal mines. Roger Harrabin explores whether the Climate Deal is dead, and whether the EU and other countries, such as China and India, might follow the Trump suit and relax their low-carbon initiatives. Image: Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump holds a sign supporting coal during a rally at Mohegan Sun Arena in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania on October 10, 2016, credit: Dominick Reuter/AFP/Getty Images
Death of Granny whale
The Science Hour BBC
access_time10 days ago
The world's oldest known killer whale is presumed dead. At an estimated age of 100 years, 'Granny' was last seen with her family in October. The scientists who've followed her and her pod for four decades announced that they believe she has died somewhere in the North American Pacific. Darren Croft, an evolutionary biologist, tells us about this remarkable animal and the insights that Granny and her clan have provided on killer whale social life and the evolution of the menopause. Fast Radio Bursts Incredibly short bursts of radio waves from 3 billion light years away have only recently been detected. Their origin is unknown. Now scientists have found one that repeats itself, so they tuned their telescopes on this tiny patch of night sky, and have detected faint smudges of light as well as the radio waves. Graphene and Silly Putty A 'kitchen' experiment with Silly Putty and graphene led to the creation of an ultra-sensitive electro-mechanical sensing material. G-putty may provide the basis for a continuous and wearable blood pressure monitor. It can also detect the footsteps of spiders. Professor Jonathan Coleman of Trinity College, Dublin explains how its properties arise from mixing the two materials Polar Science Dangers In 2016 the Arctic ice cover was deemed the lowest on record and in the autumn, there was an Arctic heatwave - temperatures of -5C were recorded when temperatures of -25C would be the norm. In a bid to understand this rapidly changing environment a team of scientists spent six months dodging polar bears and, with the ever present risk of the icy ground breaking up beneath their feet, they studied the effects of rising temperatures. Prosthetic Eye And The Ethics Of Bionics Researchers are creating bionic eyes to help blind people see again. Neurosurgeon Jeffrey Rosenfeld, director of the Monash Institute of Medical Engineering in Australia, hopes to implant tiny “ceramic micro-electrode tiles” into the brain’s visual cortex of blind volunteers this year – bypassing the normal visual pathway. A digital camera mounted on a pair of glasses captures images which are then processed in a device about the size of a mobile phone. The resulting image is then transferred wirelessly to the tiles in the brain. Dark Matter Dark Matter is thought to make up more than a quarter of the entire universe but scientists can't find it. Despite a brief flurry of excitement the Large Hadron Collider has so far failed to make any progress, and astronomical observations have also come up empty handed. All of which has led some people to call for a new generation of even bigger and better detectors, but others to ask a rather more fundamental question: maybe it isn't really there! The Science Hour was presented by Claudia Hammond with comments by James Gallagher, Science Reporter, BBC News online Producer: Adrian Washbourne (Photo caption: Killer Whales Swim Out To Sea After Beaching In Queensland, Australia © Sea World Australia via Getty Images)
Season 7 Time Capsule (Part 1)
StarTalk Radio StarTalk Radio
access_time10 days ago
Join host Neil Tyson as he revisits our fan’s favorite episodes from a season spent exploring Mars with Andy Weir, going back to the Moon with Buzz Aldrin, gazing into the future with Ray Kurzweil, listening for gravitational waves, and much more. NOTE: StarTalk All-Access subscribers can listen to this entire episode commercial-free. Find out more at https://www.startalkradio.net/startalk-all-access/
Fast Radio Bursts
Science in Action BBC
access_time12 days ago
Incredibly short bursts of radio waves from 3 billion light years away have only recently been detected. Their origin is unknown. Now scientists have found one of these Fast Radio Bursts that repeats itself. So they tuned their telescopes on this tiny patch of night sky, and have now detected faint smudges of light as well as the radio waves. The incredible distances these waves travel is indicative of a massive event happening three billion years ago. The speculation is that it could be energy from an active galactic nucleus, a black hole at the centre of a galaxy far away, or a baby magnetar – a neutron star with a massive magnetic field. Schistosomiasis and River Dams Schistosomiasis is a tropical disease caused by infection by blood flukes, or worms. 800 million people in tropical and sub-tropical areas of the world are at risk of schistosomiasis The parasitic worm spends part of its lifecycle in freshwater snails, it is then released into the water where human infection takes place. The disease is treatable, but the problem is that reinfection rates are very high. Particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa where access to safe, clean water is limited. Scientists studying the ecological impact of the Diama Dam on the Senegal River in West Africa found that infection rates for Schistosomiasis increase dramatically in the region around the dam. The reason? Macrobrachium spp. prawn populations are drastically reduced by damming rivers – they basically can’t move up and down the river – and it’s these prawns that eat the freshwater snails that harbour the parasite. The finding points to prawn restoration as an ecological solution for reducing human disease. Vera Rubin American astronomer Vera Rubin died, aged 88, on Christmas Day. Vera pioneered work on galaxy rotation rates. By uncovering the discrepancy between the predicted angular motion of galaxies and the observed motion, by studying galactic rotation curves, she found evidence of the existence of dark matter. Moving Magnets Moving scientific equipment can be a logistical nightmare. Sensitive and delicate instruments need care in packing and transporting. But what happens when you need to move a giant magnet when its 30,000 times stronger than the Earth’s magnetic field, and 15 meters in diameter, weighing 700 tonnes? This is exactly what scientists working on the G minus 2 Experiment at the Fermi Lab in Chicago had to deal with, when the Muon Magnet they needed was in New York State. Picture: Very Large Array Used To Detect Fast Radio Bursts, Credit: AFP/Getty Images Presenter: Roland Pease Producer: Fiona Roberts
Celebrating Innovation, with Bill Nye - StarTalk All-Stars
StarTalk Radio StarTalk Radio
access_time14 days ago
In honor of Isaac Newton’s birthday, Bill Nye and Chuck Nice answer Cosmic Queries about inventions, innovations and scientific discovery, from sewers, to artificial intelligence, to the future of energy, the exploration of Mars and more. NOTE: StarTalk All-Access subscribers can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free. Find out more at https://www.startalkradio.net/startalk-all-access/
Prostate Cancer
Inside Health BBC
access_time14 days ago
One in 8 men in the UK will develop prostate cancer at some stage, but deciding who needs treatment - and when - is still far from clear. Mark Porter reports on two landmark trials that could provide some clarity, and hears from men and their doctors, faced with the dilemma of choosing the right course of action.
Mesmerism and Parapsychology
Discovery BBC
access_time15 days ago
Anton Mesmer was a doctor who claimed he could cure people with an unknown force of animal magnetism. He was the subject to a committee that found there was no evidence for his powers. Phil Ball tallks to Simon Shaffer, Professor of History of Science at Cambridge University, about the rise of showmanship in science at the time of Mesmer in the later 18th Century, and to Professor Richard Wiseman of Hertfordshire University about contemporary parapsychology. Image: 1784: Franz Friedrich Anton Mesmer (1734 -1815) Austrian doctor known for inducing a trance-like state, called mesmerism, Credit: Hulton Archive/Getty Images
2017 New year Announcement
While I discuss the greatness of Mokkapati Narasimha Sastry Garu I am going to make some BIG announcements about some of the work we have been doing in the past one year Big announcements everyone Hold on tight
Star Trek - The Undiscovered Future
The Science Hour BBC
access_time17 days ago
The first episode of Star Trek aired half a century ago, on 8 September 1966. Space medic and broadcaster Kevin Fong asks what happened to the progressive and optimistic vision of future that the iconic television series promised him? In 1964, Star Trek producer Gene Roddenberry repeatedly failed to convince US television studios and networks to buy his idea for a new kind of science fiction series. Eventually he sold NBC the concept of a sci-fi story in which the human race explored space, united in racial harmony and with benign global purpose. This was the era of the Cold War between the Soviet Union and the western world; mutual nuclear annihilation had almost happened in 1963. The US and USSR were engaged in the Space race. Yet in Star Trek, American captain James Kirk had a Russian, Pavel Chekov, in charge of the Enterprise's weapon systems. The battle for civil rights in the United States was also gaining momentum. Gene Roddenberry cast a black woman as fourth in command of the Enterprise - Lieutenant Uhura, the ship's communications officer. The Vietnam War was ramping up and relations between Mao's China and the United States were at a low. Yet another senior figure on the Enterprise's bridge was Mr Sulu, who Roddenberry wanted as a representative of Asia. How far have we voyaged towards Star Trek's vision of the future and what of it is likely to be fulfilled or remain undiscovered in the next 50 years? Kevin Fong presents archive material of the likes of Leonard Nimoy (Spock) and Nichelle Nichols (Lieutenant Uhura) talking about the inception and filming of the original Star Trek series, and their thoughts about Roddenberry's vision of the future and its impact in the United States at the time. For example, Nichols relates how she had a chance encounter with Martin Luther King the day after she had told Roddenberry that she intended to leave Star Trek after the first series. King told her he was her number one fan and almost demanded that she did not give up the role of Uhura, because she was a uniquely empowering role model on American television at the time. For a perspective from today, Kevin also talks to George Takei who played Mr Sulu. Takei laments the ethnically divisive politics of the United States in 2016. He meets Charles Bolden - the first African-American to both command a shuttle mission and lead Nasa as its chief administrator. In the age of the International Space Station, he compares himself to the 'Admiral of Star Fleet'. But the former astronaut also talks about the anger he first felt in 1994 when he was asked to fly the first Russian cosmonaut ever to board an American space shuttle. Kevin also talks to cultural broadcaster and Star Trek fan Samira Ahmed about the sexual and racial politics of the original series. And, Rod Roddenberry, the television producer son of Gene Roddenberry, tells Kevin about his father, his father's politics and creative vision. (Photo: Star Trek cast visiting Nasa Dryden (now Armstrong) circa 1976 © Nasa) (Audio clip(s) from Star Trek – courtesy of CBS Television Studios)
Extended Classic – Cosmic Queries Art and Science
StarTalk Radio StarTalk Radio
access_time18 days ago
Explore the intersection of art and science when Neil Tyson and Chuck Nice discuss van Gogh, Escher, da Vinci, Giotto, the Hubble Space Telescope, and more. NEW: 12 minutes of Neil and Bill Nye drinking wine and pondering time in the “Cosmic Crib.” NOTE: StarTalk All-Access subscribers can listen to this entire episode commercial-free. Find out more at https://www.startalkradio.net/startalk-all-access/
State of the Climate 2016
Science in Action BBC
access_time19 days ago
2016 started at the peak of a powerful El Nino event, and with memories of the Paris Climate agreement freshly reached in 2015, both of which helped set the stage for the way climate and discussions about climate played out this year. It ended with speculation about how a Trump presidency might change the political stage, the Paris agreement ratified and the certainty that this year has been the warmest at least in the historical record. Science in Action concludes the year with an overview of the state of the climate, and what the prospects are for future climate change. Taking part: Dr Richard Betts, of the UK Met Office Professor Ralph Keeling, of the University of California San Diego Dr Friederike Otto, of the Oxford University Environmental Change Institute Dr Ted Scambos, Senior Scientist at the US National Snow and Ice Data Center Professor Corinne Le Quere, Director of the Tyndall Centre for Climate Change, University of East Anglia Dr Autun Purser, Alfred Wegener Institute Presenter: Roland Pease Producer: Deborah Cohen
Johannes Kepler
In Our Time: Science BBC
access_time19 days ago
Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the German astronomer Johannes Kepler (1571 - 1630). Although he is overshadowed today by Isaac Newton and Galileo, he is considered by many to be one of the greatest scientists in history. The three laws of planetary motion Kepler developed transformed people's understanding of the Solar System and laid the foundations for the revolutionary ideas Isaac Newton produced later. Kepler is also thought to have written one of the first works of science fiction. However, he faced a number of challenges. He had to defend his mother from charges of witchcraft, he had few financial resources and his career suffered as a result of his Lutheran faith. With David Wootton Professor of History at the University of York Ulinka Rublack Professor of Early Modern European History at the University of Cambridge and Fellow of St John's College Adam Mosley Associate Professor in the Department of History at Swansea University Producer: Victoria Brignell.
Maker Mix, with Bill Nye (Part 2) – StarTalk All-Stars
StarTalk Radio StarTalk Radio
access_time21 days ago
What is the maker movement? Find out when Bill Nye and Chuck Nice answer more Cosmic Queries about makers, including Maker Faire, kids and STEM, robots vs. bots, greenhouses and hydroponics, large scale 3d printing, renewable energy and recycling, more. NOTE: StarTalk All-Access subscribers can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free. Find out more at https://www.startalkradio.net/startalk-all-access/
The Woman Who Tamed Lightning
Discovery BBC
access_time22 days ago
Naomi Alderman tells the story of Hertha Marks Ayrton, the first woman to be admitted to the Institution of Electrical Engineers, who improved electric arc lights. Photo: Street lamps light up a road in Colombo, credit: Ishara S.KODIKARA/AFP/Getty Images
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Cooling the Brain Saves Lives
The Science Hour BBC
access_time24 days ago
Victims of traumatic brain injuries – caused by car accidents or falls – have a better chance of survival if their body temperature is deliberately cooled for a few days. But the technique does not help children with similar injuries – according to the British researchers behind the largest ever review of “brain cooling” studies. Pankaj Sharma, Professor of Neurology at Royal Holloway, University of London led the research and says the body should be cooled quickly to get the best results. Prehistoric Porridge Pots Broken shards of pottery discarded in the Libyan Sahara 10,000 years ago, when the area was lush and green, carry tell-tale traces of plants that were once cooked by the primitive inhabitants. Roland Pease visits the Bristol University Labs of Richard Evershed and Julie Dunne to hear how they uncovered the origin of what could be the oldest example of bubbling cereal porridge. Henry Heimlich This week the death was announced of 96 year old Henry Heimlich – the American whose special manoeuvre has helped to save many thousands of lives. The upwards abdominal thrusts are now taught as part of first aid courses. Octopuses of the Very Deep Octopuses that live four kilometres beneath the sea surface have been discovered by German and American marine scientists. Their habitat is found in desolate plains that are littered with metal-rich nodules that have precipitated over the millennia from sea water. And that is the problem – because the area is attractive to submarine prospectors for the precious metals they could harvest there. And that could disturb the delicate deep-ocean ecological balance and interfere with the breeding of the octupus. Autun Purser of the Alfred Wegener Institute in Bremerhaven describes the discovery and explains the issues. Mind Wandering and ADHD Is attention deficit hyperactivity disorder actually a problem of excessive mind wandering? Children who find it hard to sit still and concentrate may be diagnosed with ADHD. Claudia Hammond hears from two teenage girls with ADHD, talking about how difficult they find it to concentrate at school. Philip Asherson is Professor of Clinical and Molecular Psychiatry at Kings College London – and he says the idea that mind wandering might play a big part in ADHD is now being taken seriously. Migrating Insects Trillions of insects migrate over southern England every year – moving north in the spring and south in the autumn. These mighty migrations were tracked down using radar and high-flying experimental balloons. The University of Exeter’s Jason Chapman explains. (Picture caption: A doctor carries ice cubes to help cool down a patient © Thomas Coex/AFP/Getty Images) The Science Hour was presented by Claudia Hammond with comments from BBC News science reporter Victoria Gill Editor: Deborah Cohen
Extended Classic – Cosmic Queries Holiday Edition
StarTalk Radio StarTalk Radio
access_time25 days ago
Get into the science of the season when Neil Tyson and Chuck Nice answer fan questions about winter and the holidays. Now with Neil and Bill Nye talking Fahrenheit, Celsius, Kelvin, global warming, Isaac Newton, Santa, and Christmas in “How Tweet It Is.” NOTE: StarTalk All-Access subscribers can listen to this entire episode commercial-free. Find out more at https://www.startalkradio.net/startalk-all-access/
Creatures of the very deep
Science in Action BBC
access_time26 days ago
Octopuses that live 4 kilometres beneath the sea surface have been discovered by German and American marine scientists. Their habitat is found in desolate plains that are littered with metal-rich nodules that have precipitated over the millennia from sea water. And that’s the problem – because the area is attractive to submarine prospectors for the precious metals they could harvest there. And that could disturb the delicate deep-ocean ecological balance. Autun Purser of the Alfred Wegener Institute in Bremerhaven describes the discovery and explains the issues. Migrating insects Trillions of insects migrate over southern England every year – moving north in the spring and south in the autumn. These mighty migrations were tracked down using radar and high-flying experimental balloons. The University of Exeter’s Jason Chapman explains. Prehistoric Porridge Pots Broken shards of pottery discarded in the Libyan Sahara 10,000 years ago, when the area was lush and green, carry tell-tale traces of plants that were once cooked by the primitive inhabitants. Roland Pease visits the Bristol University Labs of Richard Evershed and Julie Dunne to hear how they uncovered the origin of what could be the oldest example of bubbling cereal porridge. Inuits’ genetic gift The ability of Inuit to survive the harsh conditions of the polar north may be attributable to an inheritance left to them tens of thousands of years ago, when their ancestors interbred with Denisovans, the mysterious hominid relatives discovered in Siberia a few years ago. University of California, Berkeley’s Rasmus Nielsen relates the genetic detective story. Presenter: Roland Pease Producer: Deborah Cohen (Image: Caspar the octopus. Credit: Jason 2 ROV team.)
Maker Mix, with Bill Nye (Part 1) – StarTalk All-Stars
StarTalk Radio StarTalk Radio
access_time28 days ago
Makers of the world, unite! Bill Nye and Chuck Nice roll up their sleeves to answer Cosmic Queries about the maker movement, including 3d printing of tools, food, human joints and organs; nanotechnology; ISRU and colonizing Mars; STEM vs. STEAM; and more. NOTE: StarTalk All-Access subscribers can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free. Find out more at https://www.startalkradio.net/startalk-all-access/
Testosterone: Elixir of Masculinity
Discovery BBC
access_time29 days ago
Testosterone has been claimed as one of the most important drivers of human life – through the agency of sex and aggression. In the 19th century, Charles-Eduoard Brown-Séquard injected himself with extracts from ground-up animal testicles, and made startling claims for its rejuvenating properties and its ability to enhance virility. But the amount of testosterone derived from the injection was actually so small that it could only have been a placebo effect. Today synthesised testosterone is increasingly prescribed for the so-called ‘male menopause’; it’s also regularly used for trans men as they transition, as well as for some women with low libido. In ‘How Much Testosterone Makes You a Man’, Naomi Alderman explores how testosterone had been used and abused in the past. She considers the credits and deficits of its story, and asks what it can tell us about identity and masculinity. Image: Stick men, BBC Copyright
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Three Parent Babies
The Science Hour BBC
access_time1 month ago
Babies made from two women and one man have been approved by the UK's fertility regulator. The historic and controversial move is to prevent children being born with deadly genetic diseases. Doctors in Newcastle - who developed the advanced form of IVF - are expected to be the first to offer the procedure and have already appealed for donor eggs. James Gallagher explains which rare mitochondrial diseases could be prevented and how the process works. News from AGU 2016 BBC Science Correspondents Jonathan Amos and Rebecca Morelle report from this year’s Fall Meeting of the American Geophysical Union being held in San Francisco. They discuss monitoring the melting of glaciers from space and from spy planes, and a remarkable close-up encounter with a gigantic underwater avalanche. It is the first time researchers have had instruments in place to monitor so large a flow of sediment as it careered down-slope. The event occurred in Monterey Canyon off the coast of California in January. The mass of sand and rock kept moving for more than 50km, as it slipped from a point less than 300m below the sea surface to a depth of over 1,800m. Speeds during the descent reached over 8m per second. An international team running the Coordinated Canyon Experiment (CCE) is now sitting on a wealth of data. Weather on Distant Planet Scientists have been describing the weather on an exoplanet – in other words a planet orbiting a sun other than our own – called HAT-P-7-b. The observations come from the Kepler space telescope. David Armstrong of the University of Warwick in England has been telling Gareth Mitchell more about this distant hot windy planet, a thousand light years away. Energy from Volcanoes Geologists say they are close to creating the hottest borehole in the world. They are drilling into the heart of a volcano in the south-west of Iceland and should reach 5km down, where temperatures are expected to exceed 500C (932F), in the next couple of weeks. The researchers want to bring steam from the deep well back up to the surface to provide an important source of energy. Rebecca Morelle visited the site. Europe’s Coldest Decade In the midst of the Little Ice Age, winter temperatures plummeted even lower in the extraordinary decade of 1430-1440. Rivers, lakes and coastlines froze over year after year. Seeds perished, flocks dwindled, famine ensued, and soon minorities and witches were being blamed for the miserable conditions. Roland Pease hears more from historian Chantal Camenisch and Kathrin Keller of Bern University who looked into what may have been the worst decade in European weather in almost a millennium. Digital Traces Researchers at Lancaster University in the UK suggest that iPhone users are younger and more extraverted than people who use Android phones. Gareth Mitchell talks to the psychologist, David Ellis, about the research that flags up how people choose technology. (Photo credit: A new born baby - three days old © BBC) The Science Hour was presented by Gareth Mitchell with comments from BBC Science Correspondents Jonathan Amos and Rebecca Morelle Editor: Deborah Cohen
The Lunar Legacy, with Buzz Aldrin
StarTalk Radio StarTalk Radio
access_time1 month ago
47 years ago, mankind landed on the moon. Neil deGrasse Tyson explores the legacy of that historic mission with the second man to walk on the Moon, Apollo 11 pilot Buzz Aldrin. With co-host Iliza Shlesinger, Mike Massimino, Chuck Nice, and Bill Nye. NOTE: StarTalk All-Access subscribers can listen to this entire episode commercial-free. Find out more at https://www.startalkradio.net/startalk-all-access/
Europe’s Coldest Decade
Science in Action BBC
access_time1 month ago
In the midst of the Little Ice Age, winter temperatures plummeted even lower in the extraordinary decade of 1430-1440. Rivers, lakes and coastlines froze over year after year. Seeds perished, flocks dwindled, famine ensued, and soon minorities and witches were being blamed for the miserable conditions. Historian Chantal Camenische and Kathrin Keller of Bern University look into what may have been the worst decade in European weather in almost a millennium. Solar Armageddon In the depths of the cold war, a solar storm nearly triggered a nuclear holocaust, by jamming the radar systems the superpowers used to monitor their enemies’ manoeuvres. Solar physicist Dolores Knipp has been unravelling the story of the space-weather experts who halted the nuclear escalation. Chicxulub, the end of the dinosaurs New evidence was presented this week at the American Geophysical Union Fall meeting in San Francisco, from the drilling project that tapped into ground zero of the impact that wiped out the dinosaurs 66 million years ago. BBC’s Jonathan Amos reports on the first hints of the asteroid that did the killing, and on the first signs of life that occupied the new crater in its immediate aftermath. Tiddlers on the Roof Imperial College planetary geologist Matt Genge shows Roland Pease the tiny micrometeorites Norwegian space enthusiast collected from the rooves of his home country. 500 specks of cosmic dust recovered from 300 kilogrammes of muck. Presenter: Roland Pease Producer: Geraldine Fitzgerald Image: A Winter Scene @ J. Paul Getty Museum
Science Gets Fabulous, with Summer Ash and Emily Rice – StarTalk All-Stars
StarTalk Radio StarTalk Radio
access_time1 month ago
Cosmic images from distant nebulas and galaxies are decorating leggings, jeggings, jewelry, and more. Explore the science behind the fashion with our hosts, astrophysicists Summer Ash and Emily Rice, who run the STARtorialist blog. Chuck Nice co-hosts. NOTE: StarTalk All-Access subscribers can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free. Find out more at https://www.startalkradio.net/startalk-all-access/
Making the Earth Move
Discovery BBC
access_time1 month ago
Prior to 1543 it was generally believed that the earth lay static in the centre of the universe, while the Sun, moon, planets and stars revolved around it in various complex paths, some even looping back and forth, as described by the Egyptian astronomer Ptolemy over a millennium before. This Ptolemaic system sat comfortably reconciled with philosophy and biblical scripture, not to mention immediate experience and observations. In the 16th century astronomy and astrology were closely intertwined, as the art of predicting where the small dots of light on the night sky would appear had consequences if you were the sort of person who based your actions on horoscopes. But astronomers didn't have the right to start telling philosophers and theologians how the universe was actually constructed - what its mechanisms were - they merely observed the moving dots of light and used mathematics to predict where they would be the next night, week or month. This was an essential function for the Catholic church too - as the all-important date of Easter is based around a complicated lunar pattern. But also at that time in northern Europe, Martin Luther and others had begun a protestant revolution, fundamentally questioning the authority of the Pope and Vatican. It was an auspicious time for a fairly middle ranking Catholic cleric, Nicolaus Copernicus, working in a remote corner of northern Poland to drop a note around telling other astronomers that he'd worked out a new system that made for better astronomical calculations by making the moon travel round a spinning earth, and the earth and all the planets travel around the Sun. If that were the true shape of the universe, the bible could no longer be literally true. It took 30 years, but eventually a keen young Austrian mathematician convinced him to publish his book. So a German radical protestant published a book by a mild-mannered Polish Catholic cleric, a book that allegedly simplified the cosmos, rightfully placing the Sun at the centre of our local universe, kicking off the scientific revolution and leading to the European enlightenment. But as Phil Ball explains, the real story of 'De Revolutionibus Orbium Coelestium' - 'On the Revolutions of Heavenly Spheres' - is not quite as straight forward as all that. Image: © BBC
Telugu#4 Enni Rakala Dayyalu Unnayi???
How many ghosts are there and what are their characteristicshttpsenwikipediaorgwikiListofghosts
Synthetic Biology Solutions for Diabetes
The Science Hour BBC
access_time1 month ago
Scientists have designed synthetic cells that can sense glucose levels in blood and produce insulin when it is needed. The cells have been demonstrated in mice. If human trials are successful, it could mean a four-monthly implant could stop the symptoms of types 1 and some type 2 diabetes. Psychosis and the Inflamed Brain We are all familiar with the idea the immune system can attack the body by mistake. Type 1 diabetes is the classic example. But now a group of researchers believe a rogue immune system could cause some people's mental health disorders. It is controversial and yet it could be the most significant finding in the field for decades. BBC Health and Science reporter James Gallagher explains. Do Martian Rocks Contain Signs of Life? When the Mars rover Spirit recorded rocks in the Gusev crater back in 2007. It detected small lighter-coloured lumps. Geologists think these could be fossilized stromatolites in the form of opal. Back on Earth, these structures are made by films of blue-green algae and other microbes. Now, a decade later, geologists have found very similar features in the highland deserts of northern Chile, which have bacterial structures in them, all of which make compelling reasons to go back to the Martian crater in 2010. How Memories are Made and Lost How are memories made? Claudia Hammond joins an audience at London’s Royal Institution this week to hear from three prize-winning neuroscientists about their cutting-edge research on the brain. Earlier this year Tim Bliss, Graham Collingridge and Richard Morris won the 1m Euro Lundbeck Foundation Brain Prize – the world’s biggest prize for neuroscience. They worked out how the brain remembers, how it strengthens connections between different brain cells and why it sometimes forgets. Origins of Human Culture We humans are such a successful species. Homo sapiens have been around for only around 100 000 years and in that time we have utterly transformed the world around us. Our shelters allow us to live in all climates and from the poles to the tropics; our technology lets us communicate across the planet. We have created art and music and literature; and our agriculture has changed global biodiversity, shifting forever the way we feed ourselves. In other words, human culture dominates the earth. Gaia Vince investigates what has given us the cultural edge over other animals. This includes our closest relatives – the great apes – with whom we share over 95% of our genes. 100 Women As part of BBC 100 Women 2016 we’re asking the question is the internet sexist? Only 15% of Wikipedia editors are women and less than 15% of notable profiles are of women. Half of the BBC’s 100 women over 3 years still do not have a Wikipedia page. Science in Action reporter, Tracey Logan, has a go at editing Wikipedia pages for notable female scientists – Frances Micklethwait and Rachel McKendry - as part of a Wiki Editathon. (Picture caption: A medical assistant holds an insulin pen administered to diabetes patients © Sajjad Hussain/AFP/Getty Images) The Science Hour was presented by Roland Pease with comments by James Gallagher, Science Reporter, BBC News online Producer: Alex Mansfield
Bringing Science to Life, with Ben Stiller
StarTalk Radio StarTalk Radio
access_time1 month ago
Neil Tyson interviews actor Ben Stiller about bringing science to life in “Night at the Museum,” his life as a serious Star Trek geek, “Zoolander,” and the science of comedy. Featuring the two Chucks, Nice and Liu, neuroscientist Scott Weems, and Bill Nye. NOTE: StarTalk All-Access subscribers can listen to this entire episode commercial-free. Find out more at https://www.startalkradio.net/startalk-all-access/
Do Martian Rocks Contain Signs of Life?
Science in Action BBC
access_time1 month ago
When the Mars rover Spirit recorded rocks in the Gusev crater back in 2007. It detected small lighter-coloured lumps. Geologists think these could be fossilised stromatolites in the form of opal. Back on Earth, these structures are made by films of blue-green algae and other microbes. Now, a decade later, geologists have found very similar features in the highland deserts of northern Chile, which have bacterial structures in them. Which all go to make compelling reasons to go back to the Martian crater in 2010. 100 Women As part of BBC 100 Women 2016 we’re asking the question is the internet sexist? Only 15% of Wikipedia editors are women and less than 15% of notable profiles are of women. Half of the BBC’s 100 women over 3 years still do not have a Wikipedia page. Science in Action reporter, Tracey Logan, has a go at editing Wikipedia pages for notable female scientists – Frances Micklethwait and Rachel McKendry - as part of a Wiki Editathon. Photo: Surface of Mars @ NASA, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Cornell University Presenter: Roland Pease Producer: Fiona Roberts
Exploring Exoplanets, with Seth Shostak – StarTalk All-Stars
StarTalk Radio StarTalk Radio
access_time1 month ago
SETI Institute Senior Astronomer Seth Shostak, is back to host StarTalk All-Stars and go exploring exoplanets with guest Jason Wright, Associate Professor of Astronomy at Penn State, and co-host Chuck Nice. NOTE: StarTalk All-Access subscribers can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free. Find out more at https://www.startalkradio.net/startalk-all-access/
Origins of Human Culture
Discovery BBC
access_time1 month ago
We humans are such a successful species. Homo sapiens have been around for only around 100 000 years and in that time we have utterly transformed the world around us. Our shelters allow us to live in all climates and from the poles to the tropics; our technology lets us communicate across the planet. We’ve created art and music and literature; and our agriculture has changed global biodiversity, shifting forever the way we feed ourselves. In other words, human culture dominates the earth. Gaia Vince finds out what has given us the cultural edge over other animals. This includes our closest relatives – the great apes – with whom we share over 95% of our genes. She meets researchers at Birmingham University comparing the abilities of chimps and human children, and has a go at making a prehistoric stone hand axe by flint knapping. Photo credit: William West/AFP/Getty Images
Telugu - Paropakari Papanna 12 - Dharma Nidhi
The village head in which Papanna lives forces papanna to under take a Herculean task of fasting for 30 days The fruition of which would result in a casket of gold Find out how papanna and his wife survive 30 days of hunger
Alzheimer’s Research Drug Failure
The Science Hour BBC
access_time2 months ago
Adam Rutherford talks to Alzheimer’s researcher Dr Tara Spires-Jones about news of a failed drug clinical trial into Alzheimer’s Disease treatment by the drug company Eli Style Transfer on Facebook Anand Jagatia talks to Facebook’s Yann LeCun, about Style Transfer, a new technique enabling users of smart phone cameras to produce an image in the style of a famous painting. Smart Bandages British researchers have developed a “smart” bandage that could help burns sufferers in spotting infections earlier. Roland Pease investigates. Automatic Speech Analysis Paula Hidalgo-Sanchis and John Quinn describe how the UN initiative Pulse Lab Kampala is developing a prototype that makes it possible to conduct analysis of public discussions on the radio across Ugandan English, Luganda and Acholi. Mind Reading Could it be possible to broadcast our thoughts directly from our brains without the need for speech? Gaia Vince meets the scientists who say they’re getting close to being able to read minds. From Supernovae to Hollywood The Science Hour talks to Nathan Sanders the astrophysicist who gave up studying exploding stars to apply his maths to Hollywood stars in the movie business and who leads the Quantitative Team at Legendary Pictures. (Photo caption: Alzheimer’s brain. Computer graphic of a vertical (coronal) slice through the brain of an Alzheimer patient (left) compared with a normal brain (right) © Science Photo Library) The Science Hour was presented by Gareth Mitchell with comments from Melissa Hogenboom of BBC Earth Producer: Colin Grant
Surviving on Mars, with Andy Weir
StarTalk Radio StarTalk Radio
access_time2 months ago
What does it really take to survive on Mars? Neil Tyson interviews Andy Weir, author of “The Martian,” NASA/JPL engineer Adam Steltzner, NASA Planetary Science Director Dr. Jim Green, Sheyna Gifford, co-host Matt Kirshen, Chuck Nice, and Bill Nye. NOTE: StarTalk All-Access subscribers can listen to this entire episode commercial-free. Find out more at https://www.startalkradio.net/startalk-all-access/
More Evidence that Lucy Climbed Trees
Science in Action BBC
access_time2 months ago
Detailed analysis of the fossilised bones of the 3.18 million year old hominin, known as Lucy, show she may have walked upright, but she still spent a lot of time climbing trees. Measuring the strength, and dimensions, of Australopithecus afarensis’ arm and leg bones, using high-powered CT scans, and comparing these to chimpanzees and modern humans, the team at University of Texas in Austin, show Lucy was more Chimpanzee-like in anatomical structure than modern humans. Batteries from Radioactive Waste Given that 1 gram of waste radioactive carbon contains as much energy as one billion AA batteries, why not harness this? This is exactly what scientists at the University of Bristol have been doing. They have been making diamonds out of the waste carbon from Magnox reactors, wrapping them in non-radioactive diamond and harnessing the electron flow to make batteries which could last thousands of years. Bats and Birds For the first time, nest-hole cameras have captured two different types of animals using the same nest hole. Noctule bats and Common starling chicks are bunking up in the same hole. Is this down to a shortage of suitable nesting holes? Or are they happy to share warmth and protection? Mongoose Cooperation Dwarf mongooses are a noisy lot. They communicate with different squeaks within their pack. Some calls are used by pups to beg for food, others let the rest of the group know that sentinels are guarding them, and alarm calls can spell out threats from different predators. Researchers at the University of Bristol have been in Africa teasing mongoose packs with rubber snakes to try and understand why when one mongoose calls ‘snake’ only his closest friends in the group respond. Image: A sculptor's rendering of the hominid Australopithecus afarensis, © Dave Einsel/Getty Images
StarTalk All-Stars Live! – The Science of Science Fiction
StarTalk Radio StarTalk Radio
access_time2 months ago
On 10/8/2016, the StarTalk All-Stars packed NY Comic Con to discuss the real science in science fiction. Now you can get your geek on with All-Stars hosts Charles Liu and Emily Rice, co-host Chuck Nice, and Phillip K. Dick Award nominated author PJ Manney. NOTE: StarTalk All-Access subscribers can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free. Find out more at https://www.startalkradio.net/startalk-all-access/
Mind Reading
Discovery BBC
access_time2 months ago
Whether it's gossiping over a drink, teaching our children, or politicians debating we use words to communicate with each other and share ideas. It’s what makes us human. But what if we can’t? Could it be possible to broadcast our thoughts directly from our brains without the need for speech? Gaia Vince meets the scientists who say they are getting close to being able to read minds. For the last decade neuroscientists have been using fMRI brain scanners and EEG to try to communicate with people who’d been diagnosed as being in a persistent vegetative state. They have woken up following a coma but although their eyes are open and they have spontaneous movements, they have no cognitive function and are not capable of higher level thought. Dr Damian Cruse, of Birmingham University, tells Gaia about the results of these experiments. People with other medical conditions that lead to a loss of speech, such as motor neurone disease, can already communicate with technology. We hear from Sarah Ezekiel, who has had MND since 2000 and whose life has been transformed by being able to talk artificially with eyegaze software on a computer. Neurologist Dr Kai Miller at Stanford University explains how he is using electrodes already implanted in the brains of people with severe epilepsy to determine what they are seeing. And Gaia explores the ethical problems that follow from technology that captures thoughts with cognitive scientist and philosopher Dr Adina Roskies of Dartmouth College in the US and Professor Geraint Rees, the editor of a recent collection of essays called "I know what you're thinking: brain imaging and mental privacy". She looks at the controversial privacy issues raised by the technology, such as could someone put thoughts into another's mind? Image: Fortune teller gazing into a crystal ball, © Creatas
Telugu#3 Mystery Podcast
I recently heard about a medical condition that relates closely to a lot of spiritual teachings I dug in and found a correlation between a spiritual guru and a condition that he might have suffered during the early years of his life Find out more in the podcastRamana Maharshi Barua AThe silences of Ramana Maharshi Selfenquiry and liberation in Skhya Yoga and Advaita Vednta2015 Religions of South Asia 9 2 pp 186207 httpswwwscopuscominwardrecordurieid2s2084975073388amppartnerID40ampmd5ec6bd4bb7df4f20845f9ff5a975fe4afDOI 101558rosav9i226921DOCUMENT TYPE ArticleSOURCE ScopusLucas PCNontraditional modern advaita gurus in the west and their traditional modern advaita critics2014 Nova Religio 17 3 pp 637 httpswwwscopuscominwardrecordurieid2s2084894175588amppartnerID40ampmd5430ed78b2d1f8464be60acf485165015DOI 101525nr20141736DOCUMENT TYPE ArticleSOURCE ScopusLucas PCWhen a movement is not a movement Ramana Maharshi and NeoAdvaita in North America2011 Nova Religio 15 2 pp 93114 Cited 1 timehttpswwwscopuscominwardrecordurieid2s2084860367975amppartnerID40ampmd5bc2462a060296c2d7958404e055f4d74DOI 101525nr201115293DOCUMENT TYPE ReviewSOURCE ScopusStein RSnapshots from the Void Refections on Jungs Relationship to Indian Yoga2010 Jung Journal Culture and Psyche 4 2 pp 6284 httpswwwscopuscominwardrecordurieid2s2077951815782amppartnerID40ampmd50dc95ee26e1ab14ee2cbb506faaf2259DOI 101525jung20104262DOCUMENT TYPE ArticleSOURCE ScopusForsthoefel TAWeaving the inward thread to awakening The perennial appeal of Ramana Maharshi2002 Horizons 29 2 pp 240259 httpswwwscopuscominwardrecordurieid2s2070449945473amppartnerID40ampmd5bf68b55e1b6cba3ab25cf1c29c014c27Cotards DelusionMeaning httpsenwikipediaorgwikiCotarddelusionJules Cotard httpsenwikipediaorgwikiJulesCotardOne of the first documented case reports KAUBISH VK ON THE DELUSION OF NEGATION AND COTARDS SYNDROME O BREDE OTRITSANIIA I SINDROME KOTARA 1964 Zhurnal nevropatologii i psikhiatrii imeni SS Korsakova Moscow Russia 1952 64 pp 876882 Towards Understanding Cotards httpwwwfuturemedicinecomdoi102217npy1267Other ReferencesParks NE Rigby HB Gubitz GJ Shankar JJ Purdy RADysmetropsia and Cotards syndrome due to migrainous infarction Or not2014 Cephalalgia 34 9 pp 717720 httpswwwscopuscominwardrecordurieid2s2084904660252amppartnerID40ampmd58f80604f6699faae93e59508b5addc92DOI 1011770333102414520765DOCUMENT TYPE ArticleSOURCE ScopusDebruyne H Audenaert KTowards understanding Cotards syndrome An overview2012 Neuropsychiatry 2 6 pp 481486 httpswwwscopuscominwardrecordurieid2s2084871318551amppartnerID40ampmd5df65c62a07a840152fa27ee82f4efaecDOI 102217npy1267DOCUMENT TYPE ArticleSOURCE ScopusSingh SG Heramani N Lenin RK Bihari Th Khesoh N Debbarma SCotards syndrome A case report2008 JMS Journal of Medical Society 22 3 pp 153154 httpswwwscopuscominwardrecordurieid2s2053849149376amppartnerID40ampmd58f5cc6c7320f340e08ce9132a4a5f1a0DOCUMENT TYPE ArticleSOURCE ScopusShiraishi H Ito M Hayashi H Otani KSulpiride treatment of Cotards syndrome in schizophrenia2004 Progress in NeuroPsychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry 28 3 pp 607609 Cited 15 timeshttpswwwscopuscominwardrecordurieid2s201842839790amppartnerID40ampmd5d455001cba26ab82c15db8f5d5e9d581DOI 101016jpnpbp200401011DOCUMENT TYPE ArticleSOURCE ScopusHagen S Voss SHCotards syndrome in depression and continuation electroconvulsive therapy ECT Cotards syndrom ved depression og vedligeholdelsesbehandling med elektrokonvulsiv terapi2002 Ugeskrift for Laeger 164 26 pp 34523453 Cited 6 timeshttpswwwscopuscominwardrecordurieid2s200037166502amppartnerID40ampmd56ab35665a9a1a736af126a4f05cee165DOCUMENT TYPE ArticleSOURCE ScopusMalone KRemarkable resolution of an uncommon psychosyndrome Epilepsyinduced remission of Cotards syndrome1992 Irish Journal of Psychological Medicine 9 1 pp 5354 Cited 2 timeshttpswwwscopuscominwardrecordurieid2s200026703893amppartnerID40ampmd5003b6df0346f0db1c857276446aea84bDOI 101017S0790966700013963DOCUMENT TYPE ArticleSOURCE ScopusMatsukura S Yoshimi H Sueoka S Chihara K Fujita T Tanimoto KENDORPHIN IN COTARDS SYNDROME1981 The Lancet 317 8212 pp 162163 Cited 4 timeshttpswwwscopuscominwardrecordurieid2s200019883112amppartnerID40ampmd5c8ee927c972c945f06f536b092485772DOI 101016S0140673681907583DOCUMENT TYPE LetterSOURCE ScopusKAUBISH VKON THE DELUSION OF NEGATION AND COTARDS SYNDROME O BREDE OTRITSANIIA I SINDROME KOTARA1964 Zhurnal nevropatologii i psikhiatrii imeni SS Korsakova Moscow Russia 1952 64 pp 876882 httpswwwscopuscominwardrecordurieid2s2076549162680amppartnerID40ampmd572448e80e5dcd36740354617f1833acd
Predator Bacteria Therapy
The Science Hour BBC
access_time2 months ago
Bdellovibrio is a small bacterium which preys and kills other bacteria. A team of researchers from the University of Nottingham in the UK has shown in animal experiments that injections of the predator microbe can successfully treat infections. So how close does this take us to Bdellovibrio therapy for human patients and what part might it play in tackling the growing crisis of antibiotic resistance? Adam Rutherford hears from Professor Elizabeth Sockett. Libraries - Good for Your Health as Well as for Books? In Philadelphia libraries are not just being used to study and borrow books. Public health researchers are training library staff to help point vulnerable people in the direction of resources to help them – like drug and alcohol services and homeless shelters. Librarian Renee Pokorny says Philadelphians feel safe there and turn to staff when they have a crisis. 500 Women Scientists In the wake of the election of Donald Trump to be the next President of the United States, five hundred women scientists have written an open letters demanding that women and minorities have equality in science. Dr Franciska De Vries of Manchester University explains why she is a signatory. Silicon-Carbon Life Life on Earth is carbon-based, that means the major chemical building block is carbon. Why is it not silicon? They are very similar and sit together on the periodic table. Yet silicon-based molecules in nature are unheard of. Now researchers at Caltech, in the US, have directed the evolution of proteins that can now act as enzymes or catalysts to make compounds of carbon and silicon bond together in nature. It could spell a whole new field of synthetic biology with a different kind of chemistry. Custom of Cutting More than 200 million women and girls alive today have undergone female genital mutilation, or cutting. It is where parts or all of a girl's genitals are damaged or removed. There are no medical benefits to FGM, and women who undergo the practice can face problems in later pregnancies, infections and even death due to blood loss. FGM is recognised internationally as a violation of the human rights of girls and women. The head of the UNFPA recently described it as child abuse. The BBC's Global Health correspondent Tulip Mazumdar has travelled to East and West Africa to investigate efforts to end the practice and ask why this extremely harmful tradition is proving so difficult to stamp out. It’s All in the Poop Dung beetles that live on cow pats have been shown to help stop the lifecycle of parasitic worms that infects cows. Experiments using artificially-made cow pats, some with and some without dung beetles, have shown that the industrious insects clear up 30% of parasite infections, as Roland Pease has found out from the University of Bristol’s Bryony Sands. (Photo caption: Zebrafish (Danio rerio) aquarium fish © kazakovmaksim) The Science Hour was presented by Claudia Hammond with comments from BBC News science reporter Victoria Gill Editor: Deborah Cohen
Extended Classic: The Salt of the Earth (Part 1)
StarTalk Radio StarTalk Radio
access_time2 months ago
Neil Tyson and Eugene Mirman explore how salt has been a critical ingredient in history and the development of civilization. Now extended with 12 minutes of Neil and Bill Nye in the Cosmic Crib talking about evolution, Ivan the Gorilla and how bees fly. NOTE: StarTalk All-Access subscribers can listen to this entire episode commercial-free. Find out more at https://www.startalkradio.net/startalk-all-access/
A Skin Patch to Listen to a Broken Heart
Science in Action BBC
access_time2 months ago
A soft electronic skin plaster has been developed that can capture the detailed sound of valves opening and closing in the heart. It could help monitor heart murmurs in people with defective hearts. When the patch is placed on the throat however, it can help gamers give clear voice commands in a noisy room. When the PIG Lifted Off The Pine Island Glacier, or PIG, flows into the Amundsen Sea in West Antarctica. It a huge mass of ice pushing into the sea, that has been melting at an alarming rate. The PIG was once pinned to the seafloor by an underwater ridge. When it melted off this ‘anchor’, the warmer water was able to get under the ice and increase the melt rate. New work by the British Antarctic Survey has been looking at when this accelerated melting started. Turns out it was as recently as the mid 1940’s. It’s All in the Poop Dung beetles that live on cow pats have been shown to help stop the lifecycle of parasitic worms that infects cows. Experiments using artificially-made cow pats, some with and some without dung beetles has shown that the industrious insects clear up 30% of parasite infections. (Image: A cow-pat)
Women in Science, with Summer Ash and Emily Rice – StarTalk All-Stars
StarTalk Radio StarTalk Radio
access_time2 months ago
New StarTalk All-Stars hosts, astrophysicists Summer Ash and Emily Rice, share their take on “Women Crushing It Wednesday” - reclaiming a sexist hashtag by celebrating women in STEM and examining the challenges women scientists face. Chuck Nice co-hosts. NOTE: StarTalk All-Access subscribers can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free. Find out more at https://www.startalkradio.net/startalk-all-access/
Custom of Cutting
Discovery BBC
access_time2 months ago
More than 200 million women and girls alive today have undergone female genital mutilation, or cutting. It is where parts or all of a girl's genitals are damaged or removed. There are no medical benefits to FGM, and people who undergo the practice can face problems in later pregnancies, infections and even death due to blood loss. FGM is recognised internationally as a violation of the human rights of girls and women. The head of the UNFPA recently described it as child abuse. The BBC's Global Health correspondent Tulip Mazumdar has travelled to East and West Africa to investigate efforts to end the practice and ask why this extremely harmful tradition, is proving so difficult to stamp out. (Picture: Women in Narekuni © Krisztina Satori)
Telugu - Tatayya Kathalu#6 Devudi Varam
God Works in mysterious ways Find out how Tatayya explains the same