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California and Minnesota are to restrict police officers from using chokeholds following the death of George Floyd
Global News Podcast
access_time5 hours ago
There's growing anger at the levels of violence meted out in the policing of the demonstrations sparked by George Floyd's death. Also: a French minister claims the leader of Al- Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb has been killed in Mali, and the Vienna Philharmonic orchestra has given its first live performance since the coronavirus lockdown.
05/06/2020
The World Tonight
access_time6 hours ago
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective
I Like It Here
A Point of View
access_time9 hours ago
"I put myself under lock and key a week before everyone else after a clammy jogger in a pink velveteen suit panted in my face in Hyde Park". Howard Jacobson takes a wry view of life under lockdown. Producer: Adele Armstrong
As India unlocks, how will it protect its workers’ rights?
WorklifeIndia
access_time13 hours ago
India is gradually unlocking its economy after more than two months of shutdown to contain the coronavirus outbreak, but many businesses and factories are facing a shortage of labour. That’s because when the factories closed down, millions of migrant workers, left to fend for themselves, returned to their native places. They have little to do there. On top of that, several states have diluted labour protection laws, saying it would attract investment and create more jobs. But critics say this would make India’s workers - among the lowest wage earners in the world - more vulnerable to exploitation. So, in this edition of WorklifeIndia, we discuss how can India protect its workers. Will diluting labour laws revamp the economy or create a labour crisis? Presenter: Devina Gupta Contributors: Nishtha Satyam, deputy country representative, UN Women India; K Vaidya Nathan, finance professor, Indian School of Business; Ranu Bhogal, director of policy, research and campaigns, Oxfam India
Australia:  Court bans Black Lives Matter march due to coronavirus
Global News Podcast
access_time14 hours ago
Court bans protest that was planned for Sydney, saying it poses Covid-19 health risk. But organisers say they're determined to go ahead with march. Also, scientists say 2020 had hottest May ever recorded, and the Samoan ruby team that left home 104 days ago and still hasn't returned,
England vs West Indies Classics: Lord's 1984
Test Match Special
access_time20 hours ago
Jonathan Agnew presents a special podcast remembering the classic England vs West Indies Test played at Lord's in 1984. Look out for some iconic TMS commentary memories.
Rutger Bregman: Are humans essentially good?
Hardtalk
access_time1 day ago
In times of crisis we learn plenty about who we really are – and so it is that the global coronavirus pandemic is revealing truths about humankind – and how we balance self and collective interest. HARDtalk’s Stephen Sackur speaks to writer and historian Rutger Bregman whose book ‘Humankind: A Hopeful History’ is making waves around the world. Do we humans massively underestimate our capacity to change things for the better?
Memorial service for George Floyd
Global News Podcast
access_time1 day ago
Mourners heard that a 'pandemic of racism' had caused the African-American's death. Also: Iran's second coronavirus spike, and why the French are turning wine into sanitiser.
04/06/2020
The World Tonight
access_time1 day ago
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective
The medical complexity of Covid -19
Science in Action
access_time1 day ago
Autopsies show Covid 19 can affect the brain and other organs. Pathologist Mary Fowkes from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai found the signs of stroke - unusually in young people, as well as a disruption of the immune system throughout the body. And studies of heart stem cells show these can be killed by the virus. Cell Biologist Stefanie Dimmeler from the University of Frankfurt says this finding could prove useful in providing treatment and preventative medicine. A massive research project in China has identified over 700 different types of coronavirus carried by bats, some of these obscure virus sequences are thought to have already jumped from bats to human and animals such as pigs. In a similar way to SARS-CoV-2 they present a potential threat as a source of future pandemics says Peter Daszak from the EcoHeath Alliance which conducted the research in collaboration with Chinese scientists. And is there racism in the way people with Covid -19 infections are categorised? It’s an issue which concerns toxicologist Winston Morgan from the University of East London. He says as race is a social construct it’s an inappropriate measure to use when trying to work out who is vulnerable to the virus. (Image: Illustration showing the virus structure of SARS-CoV-2. Credit: CDC HO via AFP / Getty) Presenter: Roland Pease Producer: Julian Siddle
Hong Kong: Thousands defy ban to attend Tiananmen vigil
Global News Podcast
access_time2 days ago
Officers erected barricades around the city's Victoria Park, but protesters knocked them down and held candlelit gatherings.In Libya, the government regains full control of Tripoli from General Haftar. The US city of Minneapolis prepares to hold a memorial service for George Floyd.
What difference has #MeToo made?
6 Minute English
access_time2 days ago
Sam and Georgina talk about the movement and teach you related vocabulary.
#40from40: Sir Christopher Lee
Test Match Special
access_time2 days ago
Sir Christopher Lee, star of over 200 films and one of Britain's finest actors, takes a View from the Boundary with Brian Johnston at Lord's in 1987.
#40from40: Dame Penelope Keith
Test Match Special
access_time2 days ago
BAFTA-winning acting great Dame Penelope Keith joins Jonathan Agnew in 2000 to discuss her varied career, including a starring role as Margot in The Good Life.
George Floyd death: New charges for all four sacked officers
Global News Podcast
access_time2 days ago
The charge against Derek Chauvin has been elevated to second-degree murder, while three of his colleagues now face abetting charges. The family of Mr Floyd called the move a significant step on the road to justice. Also, scientists say identifying and stopping so-called 'superspreaders' will be key to tackling the coronavirus pandemic.
US Defence Secretary at odds with Trump over Floyd protests
The World Tonight
access_time2 days ago
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective
Hong Kong: China accuses UK of ‘gross interference’
Global News Podcast
access_time3 days ago
Beijing hits out after Britain criticises plans to impose new security law in Hong Kong. A Chinese foreign ministry spokesman says the UK should give up what he called ‘its colonial state of mind.’ Also, further protests held across US but violence falls, and Cyclone Nisarga makes landfall near Mumbai.
Mário Centeno: Can the Euro survive Covid?
Hardtalk
access_time3 days ago
Europe has been hit hard by the coronavirus pandemic – now that most countries have controlled the spread of infection and begun to ease their lockdown, does the EU have a coherent strategy for recovery? HARDtalk’s Stephen Sackur speaks to the Finance Minister of Portugal and Head of the Eurozone Group of Ministers, Mário Centeno. For all the talk of solidarity, has the virus exacerbated the EUs greatest weakness, economic divergence?
Thousands march through George Floyd's hometown
Global News Podcast
access_time3 days ago
His family members were among the tens of thousands of people protesting in Houston,Texas. The continued violence in the US has prompted international concern. Also, scientists say the blood of someone with coronavirus could provide clues as to how ill they are likely to become.
02/06/2020
The World Tonight
access_time3 days ago
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective
George Floyd violence continues after Trump's army threat
Global News Podcast
access_time4 days ago
President Trump has been criticised for threatening to use military force to end the unrest. TV, radio and music industries mark 'Blackout Tuesday'. Germany divided as states lift coronavirus lockdown.
Linking devices of contrast
6 Minute Grammar
access_time4 days ago
Learn about the words and phrases we can use to link contrasting ideas together.
Trump calls on state governors to be tough over protests
Global News Podcast
access_time4 days ago
President's call comes as protests across the United States continue, also: new ebola cases in the DRC and what to do about smombies?
01/06/2020
The World Tonight
access_time4 days ago
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective
Tuffers and Vaughan: Plunkett ‘I feel my ship has sailed’
Test Match Special
access_time4 days ago
England and Surrey's Liam Plunkett joins Eleanor Oldroyd, Phil Tufnell and Michael Vaughan to chat all things England after he wasn't named in the 55-man squad for this summer. They also discuss whether he might play for the United States in the future as his wife is a US citizen.
Helium
Discovery
access_time4 days ago
Andrea Sella, Professor of Inorganic Chemistry at University College London, celebrates the art and science of the chemical elements. Today he looks at helium. Helium is a finite resource here on Earth and many branches of science need it. Doctors need it to run MRI machines to diagnose tumours and engineers test rockets for leaks with it. The story of helium starts with a solar eclipse in 1868. The event had many astronomers' eyes fixed on the sun. Two astronomers, nearly simultaneous and independently, made the same observation; a strange light with an unusual wavelength coming from the sun. It turned out to be the first sighting of extra-terrestrial helium. It would take decades for helium to be discovered on Earth and longer still for its worth to be recognised. As its ability to make things float and inability to burn became apparent, the US military started hoarding it for their floating blimps. But they soon realised that it is very hard to store an element that is so light that it can escape the Earth's gravitational pull. As we empty our last reserves of the periodic table's most notorious escape artist – is the future of helium balloons, often used to mark special events, up in the air?
US George Floyd death: Violence continues on sixth day of protests
Global News Podcast
access_time5 days ago
Unrest over the death in police custody of an unarmed black man has now spread to 75 cities across the United States. Police in Hong Kong ban a vigil for victims of the 1989 Tiananmen massacre. A glimmer of hope for the world's rarest primate.
National General Secretary of India's BJP, Ram Madhav
Hardtalk
access_time5 days ago
In some countries the coronavirus pandemic appears to have enhanced national unity and solidarity, in others it’s exposed deep fault lines. In India the crisis has hit the poorest migrant workers disproportionately hard; it’s also deepened tensions between the Hindu majority and Muslim minority. Is that the fault of the Hindu nationalist BJP government? HARDtalk’s Stephen Sackur speaks to the National General Secretary of the BJP Ram Madhav. Is Prime Minister Modi stoking communal tensions even in a national emergency?
Protests erupt in the US for a sixth day over the death of a black man in police custody
Global News Podcast
access_time5 days ago
Almost a week after George Floyd died as a police officer knelt on his neck, there’ve been fresh demonstrations in dozens of American cities. One sacked officer is due in court today charged with third degree murder. Also: Brazil records the world's fourth highest coronavirus death toll; and a privately built rocket delivers two American astronauts to the International Space Station.
Brazil’s Covid chaos
The Science Hour
access_time6 days ago
The number of cases of Covid -19 infections in Brazil and deaths related to the pandemic may be much higher than official figures show. Testing of the living is not widespread and there are few resources for analysing the potential role of the virus as a cause of death. Virologist Fernando Spiliki gives us his bleak assessment. A remarkable study from South Africa shows just how easily the virus can spread around a hospital, with a single infected person infecting many. However the route of infection is not necessarily direct person to person transmission says investigator Richard Lessells from the University of KwaZulu Natal. And from London a study in a hospital with many Covid patients at the height of the pandemic supports the South African findings; Researchers found viral particles on surfaces and in the air says Professor Wendy Barclay from Imperial College. An early warning system for outbreaks of the virus or second waves may come from analysis of sewage, Jordan Peccia from Yale University analysed waste from his local sewage treatment works and found peaks in concentrations of the virus in the sludge occurred a few days before increases in hospital admissions. (Image: Supporters of Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro wear face masks as they demonstrate against quarantine and social distancing measures imposed by governors and mayors to combat the new coronavirus outbreak and demand military intervention. Also this week, The kids take over. Our younger listeners are as curious as their parents, it seems, so presenter Marnie Chesterton seeks out the finest minds and attempts to answer a raft of their science questions, including why can’t you tickle yourself? Why don’t our eyebrows grow as long as the hair on our heads? Not content with humankind, these whizz kids have been pondering deeply about other animals. Ava, 9, from the UK wants to know if any other animals kill for fun, like some humans do. Not limited by planet Earth, these little thinkers have been contemplating even weightier questions. Joshua, 13, from Kenya wonders if our Solar System rotates around anything. And Seattle-based Michael, 10, puzzles over what would happen if a black hole collided with a wormhole. These and other mysteries are uncovered by Marnie and her experts. Credit: SERGIO LIMA/AFP via Getty Images)
Churches in Lockdown
All Things Considered
access_time6 days ago
Since emergence of Coronavirus, churches have had to rapidly acquire new technological skills, and to ramp up their mission to serve the wider community. Roy Jenkins looks at a few of the ways in which churches in Wales have had to respond to the emergency, at a time when church buildings are closed. In Newport the Warehouse Church has continued to stream services online, and further developed its foodbank. In Newtown, churches and members of other organisations are helping to serve hot roast dinners to people in the area, whilst in Wrexham one church community have even tackled the issue of supplying PPE to care homes and the NHS - by using 3D printers! Despite the crisis, churches are reporting greater interest in their work than ever before. As the Rector of Newtown says in the programme, 'My mission has never been so fruitful'.
Minnesota governor says protests ‘no longer’ about Floyd death
Global News Podcast
access_time6 days ago
Minnesota fully mobilises the National Guard as it and other US cities prepare for more unrest. Also: private SpaceX rocket takes astronauts to space station, and 12-year-old Keedron Bryant’s song about Floyd death goes viral.
The Evidence: Covid 19: Sub-Saharan Africa and Testing
Discovery
access_time7 days ago
Claudia Hammond and a panel of international experts look at the latest research into Covid-19, the disease caused by the new coronavirus which is sweeping through the world. As the disease spreads how is sub-Saharan Africa handling the pandemic? We also look at tests – how accurate are they? Should we be testing ourselves at home? On the panel are Folasade Ogunsola, Professor of Clinical Microbiology at the University of Lagos in Nigeria, Ravi Gupta, Professor of Microbiology at the University of Cambridge’s Department of Medicine, Matthew Fox, Professor of Epidemiology and Public Health at Boston University and Dr Margaret Harris, a Spokesperson at the World Health Organisation. The Evidence is produced in association with Wellcome Collection. Producers: Geraldine Fitzgerald and Caroline Steel Editor: Deborah Cohen
A police officer is charged with murder in Minneapolis
Global News Podcast
access_time7 days ago
Derek Chauvin was filmed kneeling on George Floyd's neck for several minutes before he died. Also: President Trump says he is ending Washington's relationship with the World Health Organisation, and the Self-Isolation choir prepares to perform Handel's Messiah despite the lockdown.
29/05/2020
The World Tonight
access_time7 days ago
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective
Waiting
A Point of View
access_time7 days ago
"However different our days are, we are all waiting," writes Rebecca Stott. Via Samuel Beckett, a walk in Norfolk and a discussion of the three stages of twilight, Rebecca reflects on the waiting of lockdown. Producer: Adele Armstrong
How will airlines survive the coronavirus pandemic?
WorklifeIndia
access_time8 days ago
Airlines, airports and ground-handling firms across the globe are in survival mode, trying to keep afloat. But the aviation industry, almost entirely grounded for months due to the coronavirus pandemic, is now taking tentative steps to start flying again. In India too, domestic flights have resumed amid easing lockdown restrictions. New rules are in place for flyers. Thermal body checks are being conducted and wearing of masks is now mandatory for all flyers. Restarting domestic flights has also had its share of confusion and chaos. Long queues have been seen at the airports, dozens of flights cancelled at the last minute and many passengers left high and dry. So, as planes take to the skies again, how will the pandemic impact the way people fly? And how will the airlines survive? In this edition of WorklifeIndia, we discuss how the aviation industry is gearing up for its future flight plan. Presenter: Devina Gupta Contributors: Jitender Bhargava, author, civil aviation expert, former executive director of Air India; Vinod Kannan, chief commercial officer, Vistara; Captain Aparna Singh, pilot, SpiceJet
US: Protestors set fire to police station in Minneapolis
Global News Podcast
access_time8 days ago
Station attacked on third night of protests over death of black man in police custody. President Trump described demonstrators as 'thugs' and called on National Guard to restore order. Also, Philippines reports rise in online child abuse during lockdown, and how two men in Australia broke into wrong house during 'fantasy role play'.
Raghuram Rajan: Should economies pile up debt to cope with Covid-19?
Hardtalk
access_time8 days ago
The Covid-19 pandemic has plunged the world economy into a deep recession. How long will it last and what kind of recovery can we expect? That in part depends on what governments do now. Should they be piling up future debt to cope with today’s crisis? Stephen Sackur speaks to the former Governor of India’s Reserve Bank and IMF chief economist Raghuram Rajan. Do the old rules of fiscal discipline no longer apply? (Photo: Raghuram Rajan, IMF chief economist)
Trump signs order targeting social media giants
Global News Podcast
access_time8 days ago
The US president's move follows a decision by Twitter to add a "fact-check" notice to his tweets. Also: Moscow more than doubles Covid-19 death tolls, and scientists in Peru discover a population of Chinchilla rats -- thought to have been extinct.
28/05/2020
The World Tonight
access_time8 days ago
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective
Brazil’s Covid chaos
Science in Action
access_time8 days ago
The number of cases of Covid -19 infections in Brazil and deaths related to the pandemic may be much higher than official figures show. Testing of the living is not widespread and there are few resources for analysing the potential role of the virus as a cause of death. Virologist Fernando Spiliki gives us his bleak assessment. A remarkable study from South Africa shows just how easily the virus can spread around a hospital, with a single infected person infecting many. However the route of infection is not necessarily direct person to person transmission says investigator Richard Lessells from the University of KwaZulu Natal. And from London a study in a hospital with many Covid patients at the height of the pandemic supports the South African findings; Researchers found viral particles on surfaces and in the air says Professor Wendy Barclay from Imperial College. An early warning system for outbreaks of the virus or second waves may come from analysis of sewage, Jordan Peccia from Yale University analysed waste from his local sewage treatment works and found peaks in concentrations of the virus in the sludge occurred a few days before increases in hospital admissions. (Image: Supporters of Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro wear face masks as they demonstrate against quarantine and social distancing measures imposed by governors and mayors to combat the new coronavirus outbreak and demand military intervention. Credit: SERGIO LIMA/AFP via Getty Images) Presenter: Roland Pease Producer: Julian Siddle
China passes controversial Hong Kong law
Global News Podcast
access_time9 days ago
The law allows China's intelligence agencies to be present in the territory. Also: Workers protest at plans to close Nissan factory in Spain, and the spike in coronavirus cases in South Korea.
Is the recycling system broken?
6 Minute English
access_time9 days ago
We talk about the over-reliance on recycling rather than reducing the use of plastics
#40from40: Helen Richardson-Walsh MBE
Test Match Special
access_time9 days ago
Olympic gold medal winner with Team GB's hockey stars in 2016, Helen Richardson-Walsh chats to Jonathan Agnew a year on in 2017.
#40from40: Sir Elton John
Test Match Special
access_time9 days ago
Music legend Sir Elton John speaks to Jonathan Agnew from his piano stool in 2006. Look out for a musical interlude featuring Freddie Flintoff!
US coronavirus deaths top 100,000
Global News Podcast
access_time9 days ago
The United States has seen more deaths and infections than any other country. Also: top Huawei executive suffers US extradition ruling, and the big day for Nasa and SpaceX hindered by the weather.
27/05/2020
The World Tonight
access_time9 days ago
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective
Rocco Forte: Can hotels recover?
Hardtalk
access_time10 days ago
No sector of the global economy has been harder hit by Covid-19 than the travel and hospitality industry. Millions of workers dependent on travel and tourism have been laid off around the world. Stephen Sackur speaks to Sir Rocco Forte, boss of a string of luxury hotels and a powerful voice in an industry chafing under strict lockdown rules. What future is there for an industry that depends on mobility and confidence?
Hong Kong: Police use force to disperse new wave of protests
Global News Podcast
access_time10 days ago
Police arrest hundreds of demonstrators angry over new laws planned by Beijing. These include a bill penalising any insult against the Chinese national anthem, and new security measures. Also, a warning that Coronavirus crisis may affect young people throughout their working lives, and a Pakistani pigeon is held by India on charges of spying.
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