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Science & Medicine Podcast

The China Syndrome
Discovery BBC
access_time11 hours ago
Plastic waste and pollution have become a global problem but is there any sign of a global solution? And how did we allow this to happen in the first place? Materials scientist and broadcaster, Professor Mark Miodownik, explores how we fell in love with plastic, why we've ended up with oceans of waste blighting the environment and what science and society can do about it. Programme Three: Roland Pease hears from Kenya where one of the most stringent bans on plastic bags has been in force for nearly two years, from the US where the reuseable cup has taken off and from Sweden where reverse vending machines give you money back when you return your plastic bottles. And he looks at places where plastic is the best material for the job. Picture: Bike loaded with empty plastic bottles. Shanghai China, Credit: typhoonski/Getty Images
Climate Change Missing Target
The Science Hour BBC
access_time2 days ago
The latest climate talks have heard that emissions this year and last have increased - they fell in the 3 years previously. Development of electric vehicles and energy generation with renewable technologies have helped reduce emissions, but it’s not enough according to the latest analysis. The growth of conventional energy generation using fossil fuels has dwarfed reduction from using cleaner technologies. Ammonia pollution is a serious issue for health globally. New satellite observations are able to pinpoint sources from factories to chicken farms worldwide. Changes in laws in the Amazon designed to make the conservation of forests in private hands easier could have the opposite effect. In a strange statistical quirk, if a state is successful in its conservation efforts more private forestry could be made available for development. And the maths of Democracy, can analytical systems developed to help understand stem cell growth or the behaviour of social insects be used to help understand the function and dysfunction of political systems? Researchers suggest such analysis could even be used to predict a change in political direction, in the run up to elections for example. From cradle to grave, CrowdScience examines the complex web of factors that are involved in how men and women age differently. It seems that, right from the word go, male embryos are already in the firing line because of their genetics. Marnie hears how women’s genetics are configured so that they have a backup copy of some of their genes, whereas men only have one copy. Not only does this makes less male embryos less resilient (and therefore more likely to miscarry), men are also at risk of a set of genetic diseases later in life like haemophilia. In Russia, the gap is nearly 13 years (the highest in the world) and it’s thought that a culture of heavy drinking and smoking is why women outlive men by more than a decade. which got Marnie thinking - could men change their destiny and outlive women?
Climate Change Missing Target
Science in Action BBC
access_time4 days ago
The latest climate talks have heard that emissions this year and last have increased - they fell in the 3 years previously. Development of electric vehicles and energy generation with renewable technologies have helped reduce emissions, but it’s not enough according to the latest analysis. The growth of conventional energy generation using fossil fuels has dwarfed reduction from using cleaner technologies. Ammonia pollution is a serious issue for health globally. New satellite observations are able to pinpoint sources from factories to chicken farms worldwide. Changes in laws in the Amazon designed to make the conservation of forests in private hands easier could have the opposite effect. In a strange statistical quirk, if a state is successful in its conservation efforts more private forestry could be made available for development. And the maths of Democracy, can analytical systems developed to help understand stem cell growth or the behaviour of social insects be used to help understand the function and dysfunction of political systems? Researchers suggest such analysis could even be used to predict a change in political direction, in the run up to elections for example. (Picture: Wind turbine, Credit: Getty images) Presenter: Roland Pease Producer: Julian Siddle
How Much Plastic Can We Recycle?
Discovery BBC
access_time7 days ago
Plastics are fantastically versatile materials that have changed our lives. It is what we do with them, when we no longer want them, that has resulted in the global plastic crisis. Mark Miodownik explores our love hate relationship with plastics. Programme Two: Things begin to go stale Plastic waste has been a global crisis waiting to happen. To date it's estimated that around 8.3 billion tonnes of waste plastic exists. That's 25 Empire State Buildings or 1 billion elephants. Incredibly around half of this has been generated in just the last 14 years, despite mass production having begun in the 1950s. Events such as China's recent refusal to take any more "foreign rubbish" from the west and Sir David Attenborough's graphic portrayal of the devastation that plastic waste is causing in our oceans, has prompted political and media discussion like never before. We are at a critical moment where, if we're to turn the tide on plastic pollution, it will require science and society to come together to create real change. But it won't be easy. One major area that needs an overhaul is recycling. In the UK only 14% of plastic collected is recycled. Europe tends to burn our waste for energy, and plastic has a calorific value similar to that of coal. But proponents of the circular economy say we should never consider plastic as waste at all and we should think of it as 'Buried Sunshine' - a resource that needs conserving - by reusing and recycling again and again. Picture: Production line for the processing of plastic waste in the factory, Credit: Getty Images
Gene Editing Controversy
The Science Hour BBC
access_time9 days ago
A researcher in China claims to have modified the genes of two baby girls. His announcement at a genetics conference in Hong Kong caused outrage. Experts in the field were quick to point out the dangers of the technique he had used and questioned the ethics of doing such an experiment. Scientists in Cambridge have successfully grown human placental tissue. This is not for transplant into humans, but to provide a model to help understand problems in early pregnancy which can affect both mother and baby. Mercury in the Arctic is a toxic problem for people and wildlife. It’s not produced there, but comes from industrial processes around the world. Scientists have discovered about half the mercury transported to the Arctic each year comes from Russian rivers after it is released from melting permafrost. Removing carbon dioxide from our atmosphere - and stopping it getting up there in the first place - is becoming increasingly urgent if we want to prevent catastrophic climate change. There are some seriously high tech machines being developed to try and tackle this problem, but could an equally powerful solution be found in the dirt under our feet? Prompted by New Zealand farmer and CrowdScience listener Kem, we dig deep to see how effectively plants and soils soak up CO2 from the air; and what that means for how we should farm the land around the world. And we visit a Scottish forest to find out how the ancient art of making charcoal is staging a comeback in the fight against climate change. (Image: He Jiankui. Credit: Getty images)
Gene Editing Controversy
Science in Action BBC
access_time11 days ago
A researcher in China claims to have modified the genes of two baby girls. His announcement at a genetics conference in Hong Kong caused outrage. Experts in the field were quick to point out the dangers of the technique he had used and questioned the ethics of doing such an experiment. Scientists in Cambridge have successfully grown human placental tissue. This is not for transplant into humans, but to provide a model to help understand problems in early pregnancy which can affect both mother and baby. Mercury in the Arctic is a toxic problem for people and wildlife. It’s not produced there, but comes from industrial processes around the world. Scientists have discovered about half the mercury transported to the Arctic each year comes from Russian rivers after it is released from melting permafrost (Picture: He Jiankui. Credit: Getty images) Presenter: Roland Pease Producer: Julian Siddle
Why We Fell In Love with Plastic
Discovery BBC
access_time14 days ago
Plastic waste and pollution have become a global problem but is there any sign of a global solution? And how did we allow this to happen in the first place? Materials scientist and broadcaster, Professor Mark Miodownik, explores how we fell in love with plastic, why we've ended up with oceans of waste blighting the environment and what science and society can do about it. Programme One: First Flush of Love We may not be on speaking terms right now. But we do have a love affair with plastic, in fact it can be all consuming. Adaptable, lightweight, cheap and hygienic - fantastic plastics started to win our affection back in the late 19th century. Bakelite was an early plastic invented to replace expensive wood. Celluloid was one of the earliest plastics, failing to replace ivory in billiard balls, but revolutionising the world as movie film. Plastic really did change our world. Plastic radar insulation played a role in helping the Allied forces win the Second World War and after the conflict, factories start to churn out cheap, mass-produced goods in the new synthetic polymers. But some of the key virtues of plastic may now have paradoxically poisoned the relationship. Being virtually indestructible, has led to a build-up of toxic micro-plastic in the oceans and environment. We've grown to regard many plastics as cheap and disposable, we take it for granted, rely on it too much, value it too little and are too ready to cast it aside after one single use. Producer: Fiona Roberts Picture: The Bakelite Museum, Credit: Getty Images
Goodbye Jet Engine?
The Science Hour BBC
access_time16 days ago
The 1960s concept of ‘Ionic Wind’ has been successfully put to the test in a new kind of electric airplane. The plane has no motors and uses the exchange of ions in the air to propel itself. Larger versions could carry goods and passengers and would produce far less pollution than conventional aircraft. The death of the kilogram. The ancient lumps of metal that provided the standard measures. have been replaced with a mathematical formula that should not deteriorate over time. Whale music, how Humpbacks learn new tunes. How ancient teeth helped track the development of dairy farming. From the Vikings to the Mongols, the plaque on Bronze Age teeth reveals a milk based diet. Crowdscience investigates why perfume makes listener Annabel so queasy, Anand Jagatia gets a whiff of the world’s stinkiest flower - and finds some people enjoy it – then asks what’s happening in the brain when we love or hate a scent. But could our different perceptions about this under-appreciated sense actually come down to a lack of words to describe it? He hears about one culture which has developed its own language for smell. (Image: The futuristic electric aircraft with no motors powered by ‘Ionic Wind’. Credit: Steven Barrett - MIT)
Goodbye Jet Engine?
Science in Action BBC
access_time18 days ago
The 1960s concept of ‘Ionic Wind’ has been successfully put to the test in a new kind of electric airplane. The plane has no motors and uses the exchange of ions in the air to propel itself. Larger versions could carry goods and passengers and would produce far less pollution than conventional aircraft. The death of the kilogram. The ancient lumps of metal that provided the standard measures. have been replaced with a mathematical formula that should not deteriorate over time. Whale music, how Humpbacks learn new tunes. How ancient teeth helped track the development of dairy farming. From the Vikings to the Mongols, the plaque on Bronze Age teeth reveals a milk based diet. (Picture: The futuristic electric aircraft with no motors powered by ‘Ionic Wind’. Credit: Credit: Steven Barrett (MIT) Presenter: Roland Pease Producer: Julian Siddle
Finding the Coelacanths
Discovery BBC
access_time21 days ago
The first Coelacanth was discovered by a woman in South Africa in 1938. The find, by the young museum curator, was the fish equivalent of discovering a T- Rex on the Serengeti, it took the Zoological world by storm. Presenter Adam Hart tells the story of this discovery, and the steps taken by Coelacanth biologists in the decades since to find more fish, in other populations, and record them for science. Adam hears personal accounts from a deep diver who swam with Coelacanths, Eve Marshall, conservationist Dr Mark Erdman, and geneticist Professor Axel Meyer. Picture: 3 Coelacanths at 116 metres depth in Sodwana Bay, South Africa, Credit: Eve Marshall Producer: Rory Galloway
Science in Trump’s America
The Science Hour BBC
access_time23 days ago
In the US mid-term elections, the Democrats gained a majority in the lower house, this means they take control of key committees – including the House Science Committee. Over recent years this once bipartisan committee has been used by Republicans to push a climate change denying agenda. Now the democrats will regain control and the chair elect says she will be reinforcing that climate change is real and doing more to encourage participation in science at a grassroots level particularly with minorities who are currently under represented. We ask what this and other changes to science administration mean for the future of science under Donald Trump’s presidency. Environmental policies and his generally anti science attitude are likely to come under greater scrutiny. We’ll also look at the California fires, which seem to be increasing in frequency, is this due to climate change or other human intervention or changes in natural processes? Communicating quickly, accurately and, ideally, in a way that's well-received is no easy feat, wherever you live in the world. For this week's listener, who lives and works in several different countries as a member of the armed forces, good communication can be a matter of life or death. And this doesn’t just affect military life – anyone who flies on aeroplanes may be interested to hear how clear use of language is crucial for airline safety. But what do we mean by an efficient language – it is the fastest and most accurate speech, or most widely understood in multiple countries? Crowd Science attempts to apply science and evidence to the art of speech, in a quest to discover what language is the most efficient on Earth. (Picture: Donald Trump. Credit: Getty images)
Science in Trump’s America
Science in Action BBC
access_time25 days ago
In the US mid-term elections, the Democrats gained a majority in the lower house, this means they take control of key committees – including the House Science Committee. Over recent years this once bipartisan committee has been used by Republicans to push a climate change denying agenda. Now the democrats will regain control and the chair elect says she will be reinforcing that climate change is real and doing more to encourage participation in science at a grassroots level particularly with minorities who are currently under represented. We ask what this and other changes to science administration mean for the future of science under Donald Trump’s presidency. Environmental policies and his generally anti science attitude are likely to come under greater scrutiny. We’ll also look at the California fires, which seem to be increasing in frequency, is this due to climate change or other human intervention or changes in natural processes? And new research into hurricanes suggests human activity is making them more severe than they would otherwise be. In this case the built environment has become part of the problem, with the density of buildings in cities contributing to increases in wind speeds and a reduction in drainage for floodwaters. (Picture: Donald Trump. Credit: Getty images) Presenter: Roland Pease Producer: Julian Siddle
The Big Bang and Jet Streams
Discovery BBC
access_time28 days ago
Evidence for the big bang was initially thought to be a mistake in the recording. Jet streams in the upper atmosphere were revealed by the dust emitted by Krakatoa and a collection of interested citizen scientists. In the second three episodes about the genius of accidents in science, presenter Adam Hart explores two stories of unexpected observations. Sometimes accidental discoveries are bigger than you might expect. Picture: Moonlit Coast, Credit: shaunl/Getty Images
Geological Junk
The Science Hour BBC
access_time30 days ago
The junk and geology of the Anthropocene, how mankind’s influence of the planet is now producing more erosion than natural forces, and how the materials we’ve used for mining and building in the past provides a snapshot of our geological influence of the planet. Finland’s Water shortage: Even in places where water is seemingly plentiful there can be issues, particularly caused by growing populations. In Finland to try balance the needs of rural and urban communities, authorities have introduced an online publicly accessible system of monitoring underwater aquifers, so everyone can see in real time how much water is being used and by whom. What do rats forget? And how will that help with conditions such as post-traumatic stress disorder? Researchers have discovered striking similarities between the way rats and human forget things. From IVF to premature babies we’re exploring what science we’d need to make a baby outside the body in a pursuit to answer a question from Nigerian listener, Aminu asking: Can we make an artificial womb? CrowdScience gets very close to a uterus transplant operation, peers at the earliest cells of a placenta, and sees a disembodied womb being kept alive in a box full of artificial blood. Finding the road blocks in the way of the she asks how close current reproductive medicine brings us to gestating babies in a lab. (Picture: Human impact on the environment now causes more erosion than natural processes. Credit: Getty images)
Our Geological Junk
Science in Action BBC
access_time1 month ago
The junk and geology of the Anthropocene, how mankind’s influence of the planet is now producing more erosion than natural forces, and how the materials we’ve used for mining and building in the past provides a snapshot of our geological influence of the planet. Finland’s Water shortage: Even in places where water is seemingly plentiful there can be issues, particularly caused by growing populations. In Finland to try balance the needs of rural and urban communities, authorities have introduced an online publicly accessible system of monitoring underwater aquifers, so everyone can see in real time how much water is being used and by whom. What do rats forget? And how will that help with conditions such as post-traumatic stress disorder? Researchers have discovered striking similarities between the way rats and human forget things. Space fountains and black holes: A fountain of material, largely gasses coming from a black hole has been detected. It is as large as our own galaxy and thought to represent a way in which planets and stars could be formed. The forces involve produce stability, which slows the pace at which the material moves allowing it to cool and condense into solid masses. (Picture: Human impact on the environment now causes more erosion than natural processes. Credit: Getty images) Presenter: Roland Pease Producer: Julian Siddle
The Genius of Accidents: Viagra and CRISPR
Discovery BBC
access_time1 month ago
Viagra’s effects on men were first discovered as an unexpected side-effect during trials for a medication meant to help patients with a heart condition. CRISPR cas– 9 is now a tool that can be used to modify and replace genes – but it was first noted as a random collection of genes. In the first of three episodes about the genius of accidents in science, Professor Adam Hart explores how, sometimes, the results you’re looking for are not as important as those that appear unexpectedly. Picture: Test Tubes, Credit: Grafner/Getty Images Producer: Rory Galloway
A Milky Way Merger
The Science Hour BBC
access_time1 month ago
An impact with galaxy Enceladus, around 10 billion years ago filled, our home galaxy, the Milky Way’s inner surrounding halo with stars and made the galactic disk much thicker, and starrier than it ought to be. Carbon tetrachloride is one of several man-made gases that contribute to the depletion of the ozone layer high in the atmosphere. Because of this, restrictions were introduced on the use of this gas under the Montreal Protocol. Concentrations of the gas in the atmosphere should be going down at a rapid rate. But it’s not, and a team of atmospheric scientists have been sniffing around to work out where the new sources of carbon tetrachloride are coming from and it’s China. Every year, the influenza viruses spreading around the world are monitored to work out which strains are most prevalent and potent and it’s these that flu vaccines are created to combat. But what if there was a universal flu vaccine that worked against all influenza strains? Well, this is what’s being worked on right now and it involves llama antibodies. How should we tackle the biggest clean-up job in history? Listener Michelle from Ireland sends CrowdScience to investigate what to do with years’ worth of spent nuclear fuel. Most of the highly toxic waste is a by-product from nuclear power production and the stockpiles across the World continue to grow. “Could we blast it into the sun? Dilute it across the continent? Or should we burry it?” Michelle asks. We travel deep into the Finnish bedrock to visit what could be its final resting place and speak to the scientists who are securing the facility many ice-ages into the future. The nastiest stuff in the waste soup needs to stay put for thousands of years before it becomes safe. No man-made structure has ever before lasted so long. The Finnish solution is not easy to replicate in other countries as communities oppose nuclear waste being permanently buried in their backyard. Picture: Nasa Hubble Space Telescope image of the Antennae galaxies, Credit: Stocktrek Images/Getty
A Milky Way Merger
Science in Action BBC
access_time1 month ago
A Milky Way Merger An impact with galaxy Enceladus, around 10 billion years ago filled, our home galaxy, the Milky Way’s inner surrounding halo with stars and made the galactic disk much thicker, and starrier than it ought to be. Sniffing the Atmosphere for Ozone-Depleting Gases Carbon tetrachloride is one of several man-made gases that contribute to the depletion of the ozone layer high in the atmosphere. Because of this, restrictions were introduced on the use of this gas under the Montreal Protocol. Concentrations of the gas in the atmosphere should be going down at a rapid rate. But it’s not, and a team of atmospheric scientists have been sniffing around to work out where the new sources of carbon tetrachloride are coming from and it’s China. AutoNauts in Antarctica Reporter Hannah Fisher goes to see an unmanned automated vessel, called the AutoNaut being tested in icy conditions. The remotely-operated vessel will be used to explore uncharted waters around Antarctic ice sheets to collect data on ice-melt and sea-level rise. But first it needs to have a coating that won’t ice up. Picture, Illustration shows a stage in the predicted merger between our Milky Way galaxy Credit: Nasa Presenter: Roland Pease Producer: Fiona Roberts
Free Radicals
In Our Time: Science BBC
access_time1 month ago
Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the properties of atoms or molecules with a single unpaired electron, which tend to be more reactive, keen to seize an electron to make it a pair. In the atmosphere, they are linked to reactions such as rusting. Free radicals came to prominence in the 1950s with the discovery that radiation poisoning operates through free radicals, as it splits water molecules and produces a very reactive hydroxyl radical which damages DNA and other molecules in the cell. There is also an argument that free radicals are a byproduct of normal respiration and over time they cause an accumulation of damage that is effectively the process of ageing. For all their negative associations, free radicals play an important role in signalling and are also linked with driving cell division, both cancer and normal cell division, even if they tend to become damaging when there are too many of them. With Nick Lane Professor of Evolutionary Biochemistry at University College London Anna Croft Associate Professor at the Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering at the University of Nottingham And Mike Murphy Professor of Mitochondrial Redox Biology at Cambridge University Producer: Simon Tillotson
The secrets of spider venom | Michel Dugon
TEDTalks Science and Medicine TEDTalks
access_time2 months ago
Spider venom can stop your heart within minutes, cause unimaginable pain -- and potentially save your life, says zoologist Michel Dugon. As a tarantula crawls up and down his arm, Dugon explains the medical properties of this potent toxin and how it might be used to produce the next generation of antibiotics.
How I became part sea urchin | Catherine Mohr
TEDTalks Science and Medicine TEDTalks
access_time3 months ago
As a young scientist, Catherine Mohr was on her dream scuba trip -- when she put her hand right down on a spiny sea urchin. While a school of sharks circled above. What happened next? More than you can possibly imagine. Settle in for this fabulous story with a dash of science.
Why we choke under pressure -- and how to avoid it | Sian Leah Beilock
TEDTalks Science and Medicine TEDTalks
access_time3 months ago
When the pressure is on, why do we sometimes fail to live up to our potential? Cognitive scientist and Barnard College president Sian Leah Beilock reveals what happens in your brain and body when you choke in stressful situations, sharing psychological tools that can help you perform at your best when it matters most.
How data is helping us unravel the mysteries of the brain | Steve McCarroll
TEDTalks Science and Medicine TEDTalks
access_time3 months ago
Geneticist Steve McCarroll wants to make an atlas of all the cells in the human body so that we can understand in precise detail how specific genes work, especially in the brain. In this fascinating talk, he shares his team's progress -- including their invention of "Drop-seq," a technology that allows scientists to analyze individual cells at a scale that was never before possible -- and describes how this research could lead to new ways of treating mental illnesses like schizophrenia.
How China is (and isn't) fighting pollution and climate change | Angel Hsu
TEDTalks Science and Medicine TEDTalks
access_time3 months ago
China is the world's biggest polluter -- and now one of its largest producers of clean energy. Which way will China go in the future, and how will it affect the global environment? Data scientist Angel Hsu describes how the most populous country on earth is creating a future based on alternative energy -- and facing up to the environmental catastrophe it created as it rapidly industrialized.
A rare galaxy that's challenging our understanding of the universe | Burçin Mutlu-Pakdil
TEDTalks Science and Medicine TEDTalks
access_time3 months ago
What's it like to discover a galaxy -- and have it named after you? Astrophysicist and TED Fellow Burçin Mutlu-Pakdil lets us know in this quick talk about her team's surprising discovery of a mysterious new galaxy type.
#ICYMI - Swimming Science and USRPT
StarTalk Radio StarTalk Radio
access_time5 months ago
In case you missed this episode on the Playing with Science channel… Hosts Gary O’Reilly and Chuck Nice dive into the deep end as we explore swimming science and Ultra Short Race Pace Training alongside some of the sport’s insiders – Dr. John Mullen, Dr. Brent Rushall, and coach Peter Andrew. NOTE: StarTalk All-Access subscribers can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free here: https://www.startalkradio.net/all-access/swimming-science-and-usrpt/ Photo Credit: Ben Ratner.
Where are all the aliens? | Stephen Webb
TEDTalks Science and Medicine TEDTalks
access_time5 months ago
The universe is incredibly old, astoundingly vast and populated by trillions of planets -- so where are all the aliens? Astronomer Stephen Webb has an explanation: we're alone in the universe. In a mind-expanding talk, he spells out the remarkable barriers a planet would need to clear in order to host an extraterrestrial civilization -- and makes a case for the beauty of our potential cosmic loneliness. "The silence of the universe is shouting, 'We're the creatures who got lucky,'" Webb says.
StarTalk SoundBite: Scigasm!
StarTalk Radio StarTalk Radio
access_time5 months ago
Have you ever had a “scigasm?” Find out from Neil deGrasse Tyson, Chuck Nice and Chuck Liu in this StarTalk SoundBite. And for the rest of this episode, visit: https://soundcloud.com/startalk/the-geekiverse-with-kevin-smith
The Geekiverse, with Kevin Smith
StarTalk Radio StarTalk Radio
access_time5 months ago
“In fact, it is the geek that shall inherit the Earth.” Explore the geekiverse with Neil deGrasse Tyson, filmmaker and superfan Kevin Smith, comic co-host Chuck Nice, astrophysicist Charles Liu, and physicist James Kakalios, author of The Physics of Superheroes. NOTE: StarTalk All-Access subscribers can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free here: https://www.startalkradio.net/all-access/the-geekiverse-with-kevin-smith/ Photo Credit: Brandon Royal.
#ICYMI - Rugby – Physics and Grit, with Todd Clever
StarTalk Radio StarTalk Radio
access_time5 months ago
In case you missed this episode on the Playing with Science channel… Scrums, lineouts, and spin passes – Hosts Gary O’Reilly and Chuck Nice take to the turf as we explore the science and grit of rugby alongside Todd Clever, former USA Rugby captain, and Trevor Lipscombe, author of “The Physics of Rugby.” NOTE: StarTalk All-Access subscribers can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free here: https://www.startalkradio.net/all-access/rugby-physics-and-grit-with-todd-clever/ Photo Credit: Hamish McConnochie via Wikimedia Commons.
A new way to monitor vital signs (that can see through walls) | Dina Katabi
TEDTalks Science and Medicine TEDTalks
access_time5 months ago
At MIT, Dina Katabi and her team are working on a bold new way to monitor patients' vital signs in a hospital (or even at home), without wearables or bulky, beeping devices. Bonus: it can see through walls. In a mind-blowing talk and demo, Katabi previews a system that captures the reflections of signals like Wi-Fi as they bounce off people, creating a reliable record of vitals for healthcare workers and patients. And in a brief Q&A with TED curator Helen Walters, Katabi discusses safeguards being put in place to prevent people from using this tech to monitor somebody without their consent.
How to build synthetic DNA and send it across the internet | Dan Gibson
TEDTalks Science and Medicine TEDTalks
access_time5 months ago
Biologist Dan Gibson edits and programs DNA, just like coders program a computer. But his "code" creates life, giving scientists the power to convert digital information into biological material like proteins and vaccines. Now he's on to a new project: "biological transportation," which holds the promise of beaming new medicines across the globe over the internet. Learn more about how this technology could change the way we respond to disease outbreaks and enable us to download personalized prescriptions in our homes.
How we study the microbes living in your gut | Dan Knights
TEDTalks Science and Medicine TEDTalks
access_time5 months ago
There are about a hundred trillion microbes living inside your gut -- protecting you from infection, aiding digestion and regulating your immune system. As our bodies have adapted to life in modern society, we've started to lose some of our normal microbes; at the same time, diseases linked to a loss of diversity in microbiome are skyrocketing in developed nations. Computational microbiologist Dan Knights shares some intriguing discoveries about the differences in the microbiomes of people in developing countries compared to the US, and how they might affect our health. Learn more about the world of microbes living inside you -- and the work being done to create tools to restore and replenish them.
Extended Classic – Cosmic Queries: Primatology
StarTalk Radio StarTalk Radio
access_time5 months ago
Gorillas, bonobos, monkeys, and more – Neil deGrasse Tyson, comic co-host Chuck Nice, and primatologist Natalia Reagan answer fan-submitted questions about primatology. Now extended with Cosmic Queries about cloning featuring Natalia, Chuck, and biological anthropologist Ryan Raaum. NOTE: StarTalk All-Access subscribers can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free here: https://www.startalkradio.net/all-access/extended-classic-cosmic-queries-primatology/ Photo Credit: Natalia Reagan
#ICYMI - MLB Greatness and Trout 5 Design, with Mike Trout
StarTalk Radio StarTalk Radio
access_time5 months ago
Hosts Gary O’Reilly and Chuck Nice find out more about the new Trout 5 baseball cleats, data-driven baseball, and how to be baseball’s best player from MLB superstar Mike Trout and Mike Ekstrom, former MLB player and Nike Product Line Manager for Cleated Footwear. Don’t miss an episode of Playing with Science. Please subscribe to our channels on: Apple Podcasts: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/playing-with-science/id1198280360 TuneIn: tunein.com/playingwithscience GooglePlay Music: https://play.google.com/music/listen?u=0#/ps/Iimke5bwpoh2nb25swchmw6kzjq SoundCloud: https://soundcloud.com/startalk_playing-with-science Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/startalk/playing-with-science NOTE: StarTalk All-Access subscribers can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free here: https://www.startalkradio.net/all-access/mlb-greatness-and-trout-5-design-with-mike-trout/ Photo Credit: D. Benjamin Miller [Public domain or CC0], from Wikimedia Commons.
A new way to remove CO2 from the atmosphere | Jennifer Wilcox
TEDTalks Science and Medicine TEDTalks
access_time5 months ago
Our planet has a carbon problem -- if we don't start removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, we'll grow hotter, faster. Chemical engineer Jennifer Wilcox previews some amazing technology to scrub carbon from the air, using chemical reactions that capture and reuse CO2 in much the same way trees do but at a vast scale. This detailed talk reviews both the promise and the pitfalls.
How we're saving one of Earth's last wild places | Steve Boyes
TEDTalks Science and Medicine TEDTalks
access_time5 months ago
Navigating territorial hippos and active minefields, TED Fellow Steve Boyes and a team of scientists have been traveling through the Okavango Delta, Africa's largest remaining wetland wilderness, to explore and protect this near-pristine habitat against the rising threat of development. In this awe-inspiring talk packed with images, he shares his work doing detailed scientific surveys in the hopes of protecting this enormous, fragile wilderness.
The tiny creature that secretly powers the planet | Penny Chisholm
TEDTalks Science and Medicine TEDTalks
access_time5 months ago
Oceanographer Penny Chisholm introduces us to an amazing little being: Prochlorococcus, the most abundant photosynthetic species on the planet. A marine microbe that has existed for millions of years, Prochlorococcus wasn't discovered until the mid-1980s -- but its ancient genetic code may hold clues to how we can reduce our dependence on fossil fuels.
STR at BAM – Science Is Everywhere (Part 2)
StarTalk Radio StarTalk Radio
access_time5 months ago
In Part 2, rejoin host Heather Berlin, Neil deGrasse Tyson, Chuck Nice, and theoretical physicist Brain Greene to finish off our segment of StarTalk All-Stars. Then, we cap off our night at BAM with a presentation of Playing with Science featuring Olympic figure skater silver medalist Sasha Cohen. NOTE: StarTalk All-Access subscribers can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free here: https://www.startalkradio.net/all-access/startalk-at-bam-science-is-everywhere-part-2/ Photo Credit: Elliot Severn
#ICYMI - Cosmic Queries: FIFA World Cup Edition
StarTalk Radio StarTalk Radio
access_time6 months ago
Have you caught the World Cup fever? We’ve got it bad! Hosts Gary O’Reilly and Chuck Nice sit down with physics professor John Eric Goff and answer your fan-submitted Cosmic Queries on the 2018 FIFA World Cup and the football world. Don’t miss an episode of Playing with Science. Please subscribe to our channels on: Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/startalk/playing-with-science Apple Podcasts: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/playing-with-science/id1198280360 TuneIn: tunein.com/playingwithscience GooglePlay Music: https://play.google.com/music/listen?u=0#/ps/Iimke5bwpoh2nb25swchmw6kzjq SoundCloud: https://soundcloud.com/startalk_playing-with-science NOTE: StarTalk All-Access subscribers can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free here: https://www.startalkradio.net/all-access/cosmic-queries-fifa-world-cup-edition/ Photo Credit: Adidas.
StarTalk at BAM – Science is Everywhere (Part 1)
StarTalk Radio StarTalk Radio
access_time6 months ago
Science really is everywhere. From the Big Bang to quantum mechanics to free will, we explore it all featuring Neil deGrasse Tyson, comic co-host Chuck Nice, physicist Brian Greene, neuroscientist Heather Berlin, and rapper Baba Brinkman. Recorded live at the Brooklyn Academy of Music. NOTE: StarTalk All-Access subscribers can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free here: https://www.startalkradio.net/all-access/startalk-at-bam-science-is-everywhere-part-1/ Photo Credit: Elliot Severn.
#ICYMI - Hole-istic Golf, with Craig Davies and Sean Foley
StarTalk Radio StarTalk Radio
access_time6 months ago
In case you missed this episode on the Playing with Science channel… The U.S. Open may be over but we’re still on course. Hosts Gary O’Reilly and Chuck Nice chat with Dr. Craig Davies and golf coach Sean Foley about taking the hole-istic approach to golf and the secrets that make the best players great. NOTE: StarTalk All-Access subscribers can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free here: https://www.startalkradio.net/all-access/hole-istic-golf-with-craig-davies-and-sean-foley/ Photo Credit: Keith Allison from Hanover, MD, USA [CC BY-SA 2.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons
StarTalk Presents: A First Look at a New Podcast, “Akimbo” hosted by Seth Godin
StarTalk Radio StarTalk Radio
access_time6 months ago
Hey StarTalk Fans. Today we have an opportunity to introduce you to a new podcast that we’re very excited about. No, it’s not another StarTalk spinoff – although we may have some interesting news for you on that front in a couple of months, so stay tuned. No, this is a new podcast called Akimbo, and it’s hosted by our favorite evidence-based-marketing thought leader, Seth Godin. Seth is one of the most successful and influential business writers of all time, and some of us here at StarTalk are big fans. Akimbo is a podcast about our culture and about how we can change it. About seeing what's happening and choosing to do something. You can subscribe to Akimbo in Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, or at Akimbo.me, and right now, you can listen to the first two episodes exclusively on StarTalk. So, without further ado, we happily present, Akimbo.
The surprising science of alpha males | Frans de Waal
TEDTalks Science and Medicine TEDTalks
access_time6 months ago
In this fascinating look at the "alpha male," primatologist Frans de Waal explores the privileges and costs of power while drawing surprising parallels between how humans and primates choose their leaders. His research reveals some of the unexpected capacities of alpha males -- generosity, empathy, even peacekeeping -- and sheds light on the power struggles of human politicians. "Someone who is big and strong and intimidates and insults everyone is not necessarily an alpha male," de Waal says.
#ICYMI - Extended Classic: Planet Soccer, with Neil deGrasse Tyson
StarTalk Radio StarTalk Radio
access_time6 months ago
In case you missed this episode on the Playing with Science channel… Re-visit Planet Soccer as we gear up for the 2018 FIFA World Cup with Chuck Nice, Gary O’Reilly, Neil deGrasse Tyson, and former NY Cosmos assistant coach and MLS All-Star Alecko Eskandarian. Now extended with physicist John Eric Goff telling us all about the new Telstar 18. NOTE: StarTalk All-Access subscribers can listen to this entire episode commercial-free here: https://www.startalkradio.net/all-access/extended-classic-planet-soccer-with-neil-degrasse-tyson Photo Credit: XiXinXing/iStock
Extended Classic – Cosmic Queries: A Powerful Potpourri
StarTalk Radio StarTalk Radio
access_time6 months ago
Neil deGrasse Tyson and Chuck Nice tackle an eclectic mix of your questions that take us from the boiling surface of the Sun to the dark side of the moon. Now extended with more questions on aliens, Isaac Newton as a dinner guest, Panspermia, and the James Webb Space Telescope. NOTE: StarTalk All-Access subscribers can listen to this entire episode commercial-free here: https://www.startalkradio.net/all-access/extended-classic-cosmic-queries-a-powerful-potpourri/ Image Credit & Copyright: Bob Franke.
Four billion years of evolution in six minutes | Prosanta Chakrabarty
TEDTalks Science and Medicine TEDTalks
access_time6 months ago
Did humans evolve from monkeys or from fish? In this enlightening talk, ichthyologist and TED Fellow Prosanta Chakrabarty dispels some hardwired myths about evolution, encouraging us to remember that we're a small part of a complex, four-billion-year process -- and not the end of the line. "We're not the goal of evolution," Chakrabarty says. "Think of us all as young leaves on this ancient and gigantic tree of life -- connected by invisible branches not just to each other, but to our extinct relatives and our evolutionary ancestors."
What we'll learn about the brain in the next century | Sam Rodriques
TEDTalks Science and Medicine TEDTalks
access_time6 months ago
In this imaginative talk, neuroengineer Sam Rodriques takes us on a thrilling tour of the next 100 years in brain science. He envisions strange (and sometimes frightening) innovations that may be the key to understanding and treating brain disease -- like lasers that drill tiny holes in our skulls and allow probes to study the electrical activity of our neurons.
The journey through loss and grief | Jason B. Rosenthal
TEDTalks Science and Medicine TEDTalks
access_time6 months ago
In her brutally honest, ironically funny and widely read meditation on death, "You May Want to Marry My Husband," the late author and filmmaker Amy Krouse Rosenthal gave her husband Jason very public permission to move on and find happiness. A year after her death, Jason offers candid insights on the often excruciating process of moving through and with loss -- as well as some quiet wisdom for anyone else experiencing life-changing grief.
Remembering Anthony: “A Seat at the Table with Anthony Bourdain Parts 1 & 2”
StarTalk Radio StarTalk Radio
access_time6 months ago
To celebrate the life of Anthony Bourdain, Neil deGrasse Tyson is revisiting his two-part interview with him from 2013, as a single, commercial-free episode with new thoughts and recollections by Neil. Featuring comic co-host Eugene Mirman and NYU Professor of Nutrition Marion Nestle. NOTE: StarTalk All-Access subscribers can listen to this entire episode commercial-free here: https://www.startalkradio.net/all-access/remembering-anthony-a-seat-at-the-table-with-anthony-bourdain-parts-1-2/ Photo Credit: Brandon Royal.