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Gujarati Science & Medicine Podcast

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Counting the heat health threat from climate change
Science in Action BBC
access_time17 hours ago
If the world does not curb its greenhouse gas emissions, by the end of this century, the number of people dying annually because of extreme heat will be greater than the current global death toll from infectious diseases - that’s all infectiousness diseases, from malaria to diarrhoeal diseases to HIV. This is the grim assessment of climate researchers and economists of the Climate Impact Lab in the largest global study to date of health and financial impacts of temperature-related deaths. Roland Pease talks to Solomon Tsiang of the University of California, Berkeley. UK ecologists have new insights about how diseases jump the species barrier from wildlife to humans. With a global survey of land use and biodiversity, they’ve discovered that when natural habitats are converted to farmland or urbanised, the animal species that survive the change in greatest number are those species which carry viruses and bacteria with the potential to spread to us. This is particularly the case, says Rory Gibb of the University College London, with disease-carrying rodent species, bats and birds. Do past infections by mild cold coronaviruses prepare the immune systems of some people for infection by SARS-CoV-2? Could immune memory T cells made in response to these cold viruses lessen the severity of Covid-19? Alessandro Sette and Daniela Weiskopf of the La Jolla Institute for Immunology lead the team which published the latest contributions to these questions. Anglerfish are perhaps the weirdest inhabitants of the deep sea. Their sex lives are particularly strange because finding partners in the dark expanse of the ocean abyss is hard. Females are much bigger than males. When a male finds a female, he latches on her body with his teeth and over a couple of weeks, their flesh fuses so he is permanently attached. Her blood supplies him with all the food and oxygen he needs and he becomes an ever present supply of sperm whenever she produces eggs. But this fusion should be impossible. The female’s immune system should be rejecting her partner like a mismatched organ transplant. German scientists have now discovered that these fish do this by giving up the production of antibodies and immune T cells – essential for fighting infections in all other animals including us. It was a shocking discovery for Prof Thomas Boehm at the Max Planck Institute in Freiburg. (Image: Relatives of heatstroke victims, their heads covered with wet towels, wait outside a hospital during a heatwave in Karachi. .Credit: Rizwan Tabassum/AFP via Getty Images) Presenter: Roland Pease Producer: Andrew Luck-Baker
How to control your anger
Psychology In Hindi Saurabh Gandhi
access_time1 day ago
Just like other emotional states, anger is neither good or bad. However, anger can become problematic if it leads to aggression, outbursts, or even physical altercations. Anger control is important for helping you avoid saying or doing something you may regret. So, in this podcast segment, you will learn what is the root cause of anger and what are the exercises that you can perform in order to manage and control your anger. 📽️ FIND US ON YOUTUBE: WWW.YOUTUBE.COM/PSYCHOLOGYINHINDI
Bedside Covid Test; Longterm Covid Recovery
Inside Health BBC
access_time3 days ago
Dr Mark Porter on a new bedside test that differentiates between Covid-19 and other infectious diseases including flu in under an hour. Mark meets Dr Tristan Clark who has already been using the test as part of a trial. And the world's largest study into 'Long Covid' recruiting 10.000 people from 50 different hospitals across the UK who've been hospitalised for Covid to assess their long term recovery. Lead author Professor Chris Brightling discusses the long term symptoms seen in many people recovering from the virus and how research can answer difficult questions such as how long will these continue and what's the best way to help people. And Mark hears from Roz, still recovering from Covid after being admitted to intensive care on May 26th and from physiotherapists Matt and Gemma about how early and long term rehab can help. Plus Professor Sally Singh on the new NHS online rehab service 'Your Covid Recovery'.
Human Genome Project's 20th Anniversary
Discovery BBC
access_time4 days ago
Adam Rutherford celebrates the 20th anniversary of one of the most ambitious and revolutionary scientific endeavours of all time - the Human Genome Project. Its scope and scale was breath-taking, set up to read every one of the 3 billion nucleotides, or letters of genetic information, contained within the DNA in every cell of the human body. It took seven years, hundreds of scientists, cost almost $3 billion and, amazingly, came in under budget and on time. Adam reflects back on that momentous time with Ewan Birney, Director of the European Bio-informatics Institute, part of the European Molecular Biology Laboratory. Twenty years ago, he was a PhD student working on the project, in the months leading up to the first draft. The Human Genome Project underpins many branches of science, from human evolution and synthetic biology to forensic genetics and ancestry testing. But a key motivation for the project was to alleviate human suffering. While the ‘cures’, hyped by the media back in 2000, were not realistic our understanding of disease has been revolutionised. Adam talks to Cancer Research UK Scientist, Dr Serena Nik-Zainal, from Cambridge University, who explains why the sequencing of the human genome has been so crucial to the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. The Human Genome Project is also playing a crucial role in the COVID-19 pandemic. Dr Kenneth Baillie has been treating critically ill patients at Edinburgh’s Royal Infirmary since the pandemic started. As the Lead on GenOMICC, a global collaboration on genetics and critical illness, he has joined forces with Genomics England and the NHS, to pinpoint genetic signals in these patients to help identify the best treatments. Producers: Beth Eastwood & Fiona Roberts Picture: DNA Genetic Code Colorful Genome, Credit: ktsimage/Getty Images
NASA rover heads for Mars ancient lake
The Science Hour BBC
access_time5 days ago
NASA launches its new robotic mission to Mars. The rover, Perseverance, will land in a 50 kilometre wide crater which looks like it was filled by a lake about 4 billion years ago - the time when life on Earth was getting started. Mission scientist Melissa Rice explains why this is one of the most promising places on Mars to continue the search for past life on the red planet. Japanese and US scientists have revived microbes that have been buried at the bottom of the Pacific Ocean for 100 million years. Sampled from compacted mud 70 metres below the seafloor and beneath 6 kilometre of water, Yuki Morono and Steve D'Hondt admit they struggle to understand how the bacteria have survived for so long. Science in Action celebrates the little unknown oceanographer Marie Tharp who in the late 1950s discovered the mid-Atlantic ridge which helped to launch the plate tectonics revolution in earth sciences. It would be Tharp's 100th birthday this week. New research this week suggests that coronaviruses capable of infecting humans have been in bats for 40 to 70 years, and that there may be numerous and as yet undetected viruses like the Covid-19 virus in bat populations with the potential to cause future pandemics. Their message is that we should be sampling and testing wild bat colonies much more extensively than currently. Their findings provide further evidence against the unfounded claim that the Covid-19 virus originated from the Wuhan Institute of Virology in China. Roland Pease talks to Dr Maciej Boni at Pennsylvania State University. Listener Avalon from Australia wants to know why people use conspiracy theories to explain shocking events. Are we more likely to believe conspiracy theories in times of adversity? What purpose do conspiracy theories serve in society? Marnie Chesterton speaks to the scientists to explain their popularity, even in the face of seemingly irrefutable evidence. (Image: NASA's Perseverance Mars rover. Credit: Illustration provided by Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. NASA/JPL-Caltech/Handout via REUTERS)
How to master self-control and discipline | Psychology in Hindi
Psychology In Hindi Saurabh Gandhi
access_time5 days ago
To have self-control and discipline in your life means that you are not fazed by any temptation or distraction, you have mastered your psychology by the virtue of control. This is the only way you can learn to delay gratification for a greater good. So, in this podcast segment, I go over the research of American Psychologist, Dr. Jonathan Bricker that will help you understand the only path of achieving self-control and discipline. 📽️ FIND US ON YOUTUBE: WWW.YOUTUBE.COM/PSYCHOLOGYINHINDI
S01 Transition Episode - Team It's Kritika! - Sid Bishnu, Jonathan Lust, Kritika Singh, Joshua Thakur
It's Kritikal! kritika singh
access_time5 days ago
Follow us across all podcast channels and social media via this link: https://linktr.ee/ItsKritikal We are now all prepped up to bring some interesting topics for you to listen to. From a small idea to becoming a strong and vibrant team of 4, we've now embarked upon an exciting journey hosting our 28 amazing guests as we move forward. And as an introduction, here are the Instagram handles of #ItsKritikal's team members : 1. The Sound Wizard ?‍♂️ : @thakurjoshua 2. The Enchanter ?‍♀️ : @jon_lust_ 3. The Creative Megamind ?‍? : @siddailydoodles 4. The Hypercurious Host ?️‍♀️ : @indianvegandiary Our Patreon link: https://bit.ly/37AQlZj We are super excited to make our podcast and #vlog better. Keep listening to us and sending in your queries and questions. ? Happy listening! ?
S01 Transition Episode: Team It's Kritikal! - Sid Bishnu, Jonathan Lusteau, Joshua Thakur & Kritika Singh
It's Kritikal! kritika singh
access_time6 days ago
Follow us across all podcast channels and social media via this link: https://linktr.ee/ItsKritikal We are now all prepped up to bring some interesting topics for you to listen to.  From a small idea to becoming a strong and vibrant team of 4, we've now embarked upon an exciting journey hosting our 28 amazing guests as we move forward. And as an introduction, here are the Instagram handles of #ItsKritikal's team members : 1. The Sound Wizard 🧙‍♂️ : @thakurjoshua 2. The Enchanter 🧙‍♀️ : @jon_lust_ 3. The Creative Megamind 👨‍💻 : @siddailydoodles 4. The Hypercurious Host 🕵️‍♀️ : @indianvegandiary Our Patreon link: https://bit.ly/37AQlZj We are super excited to make our podcast and #vlog better. Keep listening to us and sending in your queries and questions. 🙏 Happy listening! 🤗
25: Assam and Bihar floods I In conversation with Amitangshu Acharya I How dams and embankments lead to floods |
Monsoon is here and so are devastating floods in Assam and Bihar. In this episode, host Bibek Bhattacharya speaks to water researcher Amitangshu Acharya on how our obsession with controlling rivers is leading to more floods.
NASA rover heads for Mars ancient lake
Science in Action BBC
access_time8 days ago
NASA launches its new robotic mission to Mars. The rover, Perseverance, will land in a 50 kilometre wide crater which looks like it was filled by a lake about 4 billion years ago – the time when life on Earth was getting started. Mission scientist Melissa Rice explains why this is one of the most promising places on Mars to continue the search for past life on the red planet. Japanese and US scientists have revived microbes that have been buried at the bottom of the Pacific Ocean for 100 million years. Sampled from compacted mud 70 metres below the seafloor and beneath 6 kilometre of water, Yuki Morono and Steve D’Hondt admit they struggle to understand how the bacteria have survived for so long. Science in Action celebrates the little unknown oceanographer Marie Tharp who in the late 1950s discovered the mid-Atlantic ridge which helped to launch the plate tectonics revolution in earth sciences. It would be Tharp’s 100th birthday this week. New research this week suggests that coronaviruses capable of infecting humans have been in bats for 40 to 70 years, and that there may be numerous and as yet undetected viruses like the Covid-19 virus in bat populations with the potential to cause future pandemics. Their message is that we should be sampling and testing wild bat colonies much more extensively than currently. Their findings provide further evidence against the unfounded claim that the Covid-19 virus originated from the Wuhan Institute of Virology in China. Roland Pease talks to Dr Maciej Boni at Pennsylvania State University. (Image: NASA's Perseverance Mars rover. Credit: Illustration provided by Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. NASA/JPL-Caltech/Handout via REUTERS) Producer: Andrew Luck-Baker
Signs you're more attractive than you think | Psychology in Hindi
Psychology In Hindi Saurabh Gandhi
access_time8 days ago
It is common to wonder what other people think of you when it comes to looks, personality and overall attractiveness. Sometimes insecurities get in the way leading to self-consciousness of things that don't matter to someone else. You may not realize you are attractive, but there are personal attributes others may find unique, admirable, and even sexy. Just because someone hasn't mentioned, it doesn't mean you aren't desirable for anyone or many people. So, in this podcast segment, we are going to discuss 7 signs that you are more attractive than you think. 📽️ FIND US ON YOUTUBE: WWW.YOUTUBE.COM/PSYCHOLOGYINHINDI
Prescribing Cycling; Temperature Checks; False Positives; Choirs and Covid-19
Inside Health BBC
access_time10 days ago
As the Government announces GPs should start to prescribe cycling Margaret McCartney examines the evidence for exercise referrals with Harry Rutter, Professor of Global Health at the University of Bath. Temperature checks are popping up in bars, restaurants and receptions but do they work or are they giving false reassurance? Plus while the pandemic progresses Professor Carl Heneghan explains another type of false result, that the chance of false positive tests go up. Navjoyt Ladher, Head of Education at the BMJ, talks us through two highly topical terms - specificity and sensitivity. Amateur choirs have been closed due to Covid-19. Margaret talks to Professor Jackie Cassell who is currently researching what aspect of choirs congregating is particularly dangerous and whether the singing is actually a red herring. Producer: Erika Wright Studio Manager: John Boland
Brian Greene
Discovery BBC
access_time11 days ago
Brian Greene studies the universe at the largest and smallest scales imaginable. When he was just twelve years old, Brian wandered round Columbia University in New York looking for someone to teach him mathematics, with a letter of recommendation from his school teacher. While his mother wanted him to make money, his father encouraged Brian to pursue his passion, which was trying to understand the nature of the universe. He studied physics at Harvard University and won a Rhodes Scholarship to Oxford University. While at Oxford he learnt about a bold new Theory of Everything which predicts that the universe is made not of particles but rather tiny strings which vibrate in multiple dimensions. Now a Professor at Columbia University, he has worked on string theory ever since. He talks to Jim Al-Khalili about the rise and fall of string and superstring theory and why when he first started to think about what would happen to the universe at the end of time, he experienced a feeling of ‘hollow dread’.
Making a Covid-19 vaccine for two billion people
The Science Hour BBC
access_time12 days ago
There's been encouraging news about the Oxford Covid-19 vaccine this week from a trial involving about 1,000 people. But how great is the challenge in scaling up from making a few thousand doses of the vaccine to manufacturing two billion by the end of this year? Sandy Douglas of Oxford's Jenner Institute explains how they plan to mass-produce the vaccine safely given the speed and magnitude of the scale up. A new kind of treatment for Covid-19 may come from an unlikely source: llamas and alpacas, the South American relatives of the camel. Camelids produce unusually small and simple antibodies against viruses, including the coronavirus. This feature may make these molecules an effective Covid-19 therapy. Jane Chambers reports on research in Chile and the UK. Also in the programme: what has made just a few mosquito species evolve a preference for biting humans, and the theory that 800 million years ago the Moon and the Earth were bombarded by a shower of asteroids which plunged the Earth into a global ice age - an event which changed the course of the evolution of life. These days we're more acquainted with soap than ever before, as we lather up to help stop the spread of coronavirus. And for CrowdScience listener Sharon, this set off a steady stream of soapy questions: how does soap actually work? How was it discovered in the first place, long before anyone knew anything about germs? Are different things used for washing around the world, and are some soaps better than others? We set up a CrowdScience home laboratory to explore the soap making process with advice from science-based beauty blogger Dr Michelle Wong, and find out what it is about soap's chemistry that gives it its germ-fighting superpowers. Soap has been around for at least 4000 years; we compare ancient soap making to modern methods, and hear about some of the soap alternatives used around the world, like the soap berries of India. And as for the question of whether some soaps are better than others? We discover why antibacterial soaps aren't necessarily a good idea, and why putting a toy inside a bar of soap might be more important than tweaking its ingredients. (Image: A team of experts at the University of Oxford are working to develop a vaccine that could prevent people from getting Covid-19. Credit: Press Association)
BOOK SUMMARY: THE HAPPINESS HYPOTHESIS by Jonathan Haidt
Psychology In Hindi Saurabh Gandhi
access_time13 days ago
The Happiness Hypothesis: Finding Modern Truth in Ancient Wisdom is a 2006 psychology book by Jonathan Haidt written for a general audience. In it, Haidt poses several "Great Ideas" on happiness espoused by thinkers of the past – Plato, Buddha, Jesus and others – and examines them in the light of contemporary psychological research, extracting from them any lessons that still apply to our modern lives. Central to the book are the concepts of virtue, happiness, fulfillment, and meaning. 📽️FIND US ON YOUTUBE: WWW.YOUTUBE.COM/PSYCHOLOGYINHINDI
24: The challenges posed by a rapidly heating planet I In conversation with Dr Chirag Dhara I
In this episode, host Bibek Bhattacharya speaks with a climate scientist, Dr Chirag Dhara. Dr Dhara talks about the different ways in which climate change is affecting India and some of the impacts that he is concerned about.
Making a Covid-19 vaccine for two billion people
Science in Action BBC
access_time15 days ago
There’s been encouraging news about the Oxford Covid-19 vaccine this week from a trial involving about 1,000 people. But how great is the challenge in scaling up from making a few thousand doses of the vaccine to manufacturing two billion by the end of this year? Sandy Douglas of Oxford’s Jenner Institute explains how they plan to mass-produce the vaccine safely given the speed and magnitude of the scale up. A new kind of treatment for Covid-19 may come from an unlikely source: llamas and alpacas, the South American relatives of the camel. Camelids produce unusually small and simple antibodies against viruses, including the coronavirus. This feature may make these molecules an effective Covid-19 therapy. Jane Chambers reports on research in Chile and the UK. Also in the programme: what has made just a few mosquito species evolve a preference for biting humans, and the theory that 800 million years ago the Moon and the Earth were bombarded by a shower of asteroids which plunged the Earth into a global ice age – an event which changed the course of the evolution of life. Presenter: Roland Pease Producer: Andrew Luck-Baker
Public Health in the time of Coronavirus
Inside Health BBC
access_time17 days ago
Public health doctors don't dash around hospitals wearing white coats brandishing stethoscopes. The work of this medical specialty is mainly outside of hospitals and it has a very long history. It has a local, national and global reach, an international skeleton charged with the care of populations. And in this pandemic, it is public health which is doing the heavy lifting. In this special edition of Inside Health Dr Margaret McCartney investigates the serious questions being raised about the UK's public health response to trying to stop the spread of the virus, and how tension, over the performance of the government's Test and Trace programme, has spilled out into the open. Margaret hears from Directors of Public Health who feel that their role and expertise in local communities working closely with local Public Health England teams has been overlooked. Instead a new national Test and Trace system has been set up using private companies outside the traditional public health infrastructure. The DPH for Wigan and lead director of public health for the Greater Manchester Combined Authority, Professor Kate Ardern, tells Margaret she believes government didn't understand the role and the experience of local public health teams and so instead of empowering them to oversee test, trace and isolate services, set up a new national system, from scratch, using private companies without public health experience. And the data needed locally to identify and deal with Covid cases, she tells Margaret, just hasn't come through. This is despite the fact that the law is clear; Covid is a notifiable disease and local directors of public health should receive the information. Margaret explores the history of public health with Professor Martin Gorsky from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and hears from Professor of Global Health at Queen Mary, University of London, David McCoy, who believes the very structure of public health institutions after the 2012 Health and Social Care fragmented the service, leaving the country vulnerable (as he and 400 other experts warned at the time) to a pandemic. Public Health England's Medical Director, Professor Yvonne Doyle, rejects suggestions that PHE is insufficiently independent from government and insists that both national and local public health teams have pulled together in these unprecedented times. Producer: Fiona Hill
Jane Goodall
Discovery BBC
access_time18 days ago
Jane Goodall, aged 86, reflects on the years she spent living with the wild chimpanzees in Gombe in eastern Tanzania and tells Jim Al Khalili why she believes the best way to bring about change is to ‘creep into people’s hearts’. Jane shot to fame when she appeared on the cover of National Geographic magazine in 1963 and appeared in a documentary film directed by Orson Welles. Her ground breaking observations introduced us to the social and emotional lives of wild chimpanzees and changed our view of what it is to be human. Images of her younger self play wrestling with baby chimps make Jane feel slightly apprehensive now but at the time she didn’t give it a second thought. However, she did take care to protect her young son. Seeing distressing footage of chimps who were living in captivity, she gave up fieldwork to become an activist, working to liberate chimpanzees that were being used for medical research or sold for meat or as pets, and setting up chimp sanctuaries for animals that were no longer able to live in the wild. For the last thirty years, she has campaigned gently but relentlessly to protect wild animals and wild places, touring the world and performing on stage in front of huge audiences. Her global youth programme, Roots and Shoots has inspired and empowered millions of people to understand and respect nature, leading some to call her ‘the mother Theresa of the environment’. A label she dislikes. Producer: Anna Buckley Photo credit: the Jane Goodall Institute / By Bill Wallauer
Psychology of story-telling | Why do we tell stories?
Psychology In Hindi Saurabh Gandhi
access_time19 days ago
Stories are recognizable patterns, and in those patterns we find meaning. We use stories to make sense of our world and to share that understanding with others. They are the signal within the noise. So powerful is our impulse to detect story patterns that we see them even when they're not there. Listen to the entire podcast segment to learn more about stories. 📽️FIND US ON YOUTUBE: WWW.YOUTUBE.COM/PSYCHOLOGYINHINDI
How long do Covid-19 antibodies last?
The Science Hour BBC
access_time20 days ago
Science in Action looks at some of the latest research on how response of our immune system to infection by the coronavirus. Researchers at Kings College London find that protective antibodies appear to fade away after about three months following infection whereas a team at the Karolinska Institute has discovered that although antibodies may decline, other important players called T cells in our defences do not. Dr’s Katie Doores and Marcus Buggert talk about the implications of these discoveries for the quest for a vaccine against the coronavirus. Roland Pease also talks to Dr Barney Graham of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases in the United States about the results from the Phase 1 trial of novel type of vaccine against the virus. NIAID have partnered with biotech company Moderna to produce the first mRNA vaccine in the Institute’s pandemic preparedness program. Biologist Dr Sonja Wild tells Roland about the remarkable fishing strategy devised by dolphins in Shark Bay, Australia. They chase fish into the empty shell of giant sea snails, then take the shells to the surface and tip the fish into their mouths. Dr Wild’s 7 years of research has revealed how the dolphins have learned to do this. Think of the oceans and an empty and peaceful expanse relatively untouched by humankind might come to mind. But is this peace an illusion? CrowdScience listener Dani wants to know if the noise of shipping and other human activity on the oceans is impacting on sea life. To find out, Marnie Chesterton takes a deep dive to learn how marine animals have evolved to use sound; from navigating their environments to finding a mate or hiding from prey. She then speaks to a scientist who is using acoustic observatories to track the many ways human activity - like sonar and shipping – can interfere. Marnie virtually visits a German lab which tests the ears of beached whales, dolphins and seals from around the world to try and ascertain whether they suffered hearing damage, and what might have caused it. What other smaller creatures are negatively impacted by underwater noise? Marnie learns that acoustic trauma is more widespread than first thought. As human life continues to expand along ocean waters, what is being done to reduce the impact of sound? Marnie meets some of the designers at the forefront of naval architecture to see how ship design, from propellers to air bubbles and even wind powered vessels can contribute to reducing the racket in the oceans. Main image: Abs COVID-19 antibody - Viral Infection concept. Credit: Getty Images
23: Looking for a clean energy economy I In conversation with Ulka Kelkar I World approaches a heat barrier
In this episode, host Bibek Bhattacharya speaks with climate policy expert Ulka Kelkar about what an Indian clean energy economy would look like.
How long do Covid-19 antibodies last?
Science in Action BBC
access_time22 days ago
Science in Action looks at some of the latest research on how response of our immune system to infection by the coronavirus. Researchers at Kings College London find that protective antibodies appear to fade away after about three months following infection whereas a team at the Karolinska Institute has discovered that although antibodies may decline, other important players called T cells in our defences do not. Dr’s Katie Doores and Marcus Buggert talk about the implications of these discoveries for the quest for a vaccine against the coronavirus. Roland Pease also talks to Dr Barney Graham of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases in the United States about the results from the Phase 1 trial of novel type of vaccine against the virus. NIAID have partnered with biotech company Moderna to produce the first mRNA vaccine in the Institute’s pandemic preparedness program. Biologist Dr Sonja Wild tells Roland about the remarkable fishing strategy devised by dolphins in Shark Bay, Australia. They chase fish into the empty shell of giant sea snails, then take the shells to the surface and tip the fish into their mouths. Dr Wild’s 7 years of research has revealed how the dolphins have learned to do this. (Image: Getty Images) Presenter: Roland Pease Producer: Andrew Luck-Baker
Covid-19 and ethnicity in medicine; medical devices safety review
Inside Health BBC
access_time24 days ago
One of the most striking features of the coronavirus pandemic is the disproportionate toll it’s taken on some groups in society. Research by the Office for National Statistics shows black people are nearly twice as likely to have died from coronavirus than white people. And you see a similar pattern of elevated risk in other ethnicities too. Why is this? And to what extent is Covid 19 shedding light on approaches being taken in medicine more generally when assessing and treating people from Black, Asian and Minority ethnic groups? We hear from GP Dr Navjoyt Ladher who’s been navigating the language of race for the British Medical Journal; Dr Rohin Francis, cardiologist and host of the Medlife Crisis podcast, and Prof Kamlish Khunti who’s establishing a detailed Covid risk score to establish exactly who’s at most risk of infection. A major review has found women’s lives have been ruined and babies have been harmed in the womb and yet concerns were dismissed for years as simply “women’s problems”. Those are the findings of the Independent Medicines and Medical Devices Safety Review. It looked at the hormonal pregnancy test Primodos, the epilepsy drug sodium valproate and vaginal mesh implants which are used to treat prolapse and incontinence. Inside Health’s resident GP Margaret McCartney. discusses what needs to change. Presenter: James Gallagher Producer: Adrian Washbourne
7 Psychological problems caused by parenting behavior
Psychology In Hindi Saurabh Gandhi
access_time25 days ago
There’s no doubt that parents are critical figures in a child’s development. We know that family-related early experiences have profound and long-lasting effects on children – many of which are positive. Adverse childhood experiences, however, can cause harm or distress and may disrupt the child’s physical and/or psychological development to some extent. That's why in this podcast segment we discuss 7 such problems caused by early childhood trauma. 📽️FIND US ON YOUTUBE: WWW.YOUTUBE.COM/PSYCHOLOGYINHINDI
Bed
Discovery BBC
access_time25 days ago
After a long journey, there’s nothing nicer for Katy than climbing into her own bed. It’s often the first major purchase we make when we grow up and leave home. Its significance was not lost on our ancestors. The bed was often the place where societal attitudes to sleep, superstition, sex, and status were played out, sometimes in dramatic form. So where did the bed come from, and what can this everyday object tell us about ourselves? A sleeper in early modern times believed that sleep was akin to death, with the devil waiting to pounce after darkness. So bed-time rituals were performed at the bedside and wolves’ teeth were often hung around the sleeper’s neck. Iron daggers were dangled over the cradles of infants at night to prevent them from being changed into demon babies. While we may have outgrown a fear of the devil, sleep expert and neuroscientist Prof Russell Foster fears the modern-day obsession that’s disrupting our sleep – our mobile devices. His advice? Prepare your bed for a good night’s sleep and defend it with a passion. Also featuring resident public historian Greg Jenner, and Prof Sasha Handley, expert on Early Modern History and sleep during this time. Producer: Beth Eastwood. Picture: Bed, Credit: Igor Vershinsky/Getty Images
22: Environment Impact Assessment I In conversation with Neha Sinha I Environmental degradation and Climate Change
In this episode, host, Bibek Bhattacharya speaks with conservation biologist Neha Sinha on environmental degradation, the importance of the Environment Impact Assessments, and the link between climate change and the destruction of nature.
Rwanda’s game changing coronavirus test
The Science Hour BBC
access_time27 days ago
African scientists have developed a reliable, quick and cheap testing method which could be used by worldwide as the basis for mass testing programmes. The method, which produces highly accurate results, is built around mathematical algorithms developed at the African Institute for Mathematical Sciences in Kigali. We speak to Neil Turok who founded the institute, Leon Mutesa Professor of human genetics on the government coronavirus task force, and Wilfred Ndifon, the mathematical biologist who devised the algorithm. The virus is mutating as it spreads, but what does this mean? There is particular concern over changes to the spike protein, part of the virus needed to enter human cells. Jeremy Luban has been analysing this mechanism. So far he says ongoing genetic changes seem unlikely to impact on the effectiveness of treatments for Covid -19. And Heatwaves are increasing, particularly in tropical regions, that’s the finding of a new analysis by climate scientist Sarah Perkins – Kirkpatrick. Worms are not the cutest of creatures. They’re slimy, often associated with death and tend to bring on feelings of disgust in many of us. But listener Dinesh thinks they’re underrated and wants to know whether earthworms could be the key to our planet’s future agricultural success? He’s an organic farmer in India’s Tamil Nadu province who grows these annelids to add to the soil, and he wants Crowdscience to find out exactly what they’re doing. Anand Jagatia dons his gardening gloves and digs the dirt on these remarkable creatures, discovering how they can help improve soil quality, prevent fields from becoming waterlogged, and improve microbial numbers, all of which has the potential to increase crop yield. But he also investigates the so-called ‘earthworm dilemma’ and the idea that in some parts of the world, boreal forest worms are releasing carbon back into the atmosphere, which could have dangerous consequences for climate change. Main image: People stand in white circles drawn on the ground to adhere to social distancing in Kigali, Rwanda, on May 4, 2020, Photo by Simon Wohlfahrt / AFP via Getty Images
S01E03 Therapy: Reinventing The MInda, Body, and Soul
It's Kritikal! kritika singh
access_time27 days ago
In this episode, Kritika Singh is in conversation with Psychotherapist Farhat Gupta discussing various elements of mental health and how to normalise the conversation around them. Cover art: Sid Bishnu To connect with Farhat, visit: Farhat Gupta To support our podcast, become our Patreon here
Therapy: Reinventing The Mind, Body and Soul x Farhat Gupta
It's Kritikal! kritika singh
access_time27 days ago
In this episode, Kritika Singh is in conversation with Psychotherapist Farhat Gupta discussing various elements of mental health and how to normalise the conversation around them. Cover art: Sid Bishnu To connect with Farhat, visit: Farhat Gupta To support our podcast, become our Patreon here
Covid 19: recovery
Discovery BBC
access_time27 days ago
Claudia Hammond and a panel of international experts look at the latest research into Covid-19, the disease caused by the new coronavirus which is sweeping through the world. Our panel of experts discuss how many people make full recoveries but others are finding that life hasn’t yet returned to normal months after infection. In India and Sweden, clinics are being set up to follow survivors of the virus and doctors are discovering that people are having difficulties assimilating what happened to them. And we hear about how three generations of one Spanish family all survived and how they are all recovering differently, including the 96 year old grandmother. On the panel are Seema Shah, Professor of Medical Ethics at North Western University, Professor David Heymann, an infectious disease epidemiologist at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Professor Soo Aleman from the Karolinska University Hospital in Sweden, Dr David Collier, Clinical director of the William Harvey Clinical Research Centre, Queen Mary University of London and Dr Netravathi M, Professor of Neurology at the National Institute for Mental Health and Neuroscience in Bangalore in India. The Evidence is produced in association with Wellcome Collection. Producers: Geraldine Fitzgerald and Caroline Steel Editor: Deborah Cohen
Rwanda’s game changing coronavirus test
Science in Action BBC
access_time29 days ago
African scientists have developed a reliable, quick and cheap testing method which could be used by worldwide as the basis for mass testing programmes. The method, which produces highly accurate results, is built around mathematical algorithms developed at the African Institute for Mathematical Sciences in Kigali. We speak to Neil Turok who founded the institute, Leon Mutesa Professor of human genetics on the government coronavirus task force, and Wilfred Ndifon, the mathematical biologist who devised the algorithm. The virus is mutating as it spreads, but what does this mean? There is particular concern over changes to the spike protein, part of the virus needed to enter human cells. Jeremy Luban has been analysing this mechanism. So far he says ongoing genetic changes seem unlikely to impact on the effectiveness of treatments for Covid -19. And Heatwaves are increasing, particularly in tropical regions, that’s the finding of a new analysis by climate scientist Sarah Perkins – Kirkpatrick. Presenter: Roland Pease Producer: Julian Siddle Main image: People stand in white circles drawn on the ground to adhere to social distancing in Kigali, Rwanda, on May 4, 2020, Photo by Simon Wohlfahrt / AFP via Getty Images
Why do women like Bad-Boys | THE BAD-BOY ARCHETYPE
Psychology In Hindi Saurabh Gandhi
access_time1 month ago
Every woman has dated a guy who was clearly bad news, but she just couldn't resist. And yet, despite all the warnings and red flags, the pull of dating a "bad boy" was just too strong. So, even with all of the signs that heartbreak is on the horizon, why do girls still find bad boys so appealing? Listen to the entire podcast segment to find out. 📽️FIND US ON YOUTUBE: WWW.YOUTUBE.COM/PSYCHOLOGYINHINDI
Covid-19 and the Impact on UK Cancer Services
Inside Health BBC
access_time1 month ago
Coronavirus has turned the NHS upside down and inside out and by re-organising to treat people with the virus, other potentially fatal diseases like cancer have taken a backseat. At University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, which Inside Health visited weekly as the pandemic unfolded, cancer diagnoses fell by half in March and April and of the 50% who were asked to come in for follow up, only 25% actually did. The virus was more frightening than a potential cancer diagnosis. Divisional Director for Medicine at Southampton, Dr Trevor Smith, tells James Gallagher, the BBC's health and science correspondent. that patients are coming back, but it will take a long time to tackle the backlog. For those with cancer caught up in the pandemic, they have experienced disruption, cancellations, altered treatments and they have had to cope with consultations and even surgery by themselves, without loved ones to support them. Charly from Wiltshire was diagnosed with breast cancer in February and her treatment was changed as lockdown happened. Instead of chemotherapy then surgery, she had surgery first. And a mastectomy instead of a lumpectomy. But despite the disruption to her care, she still considers herself one of the lucky ones because she did get treatment. Others weren't so lucky and across the country, lives have been lost. The focus now is on Covid-proofing cancer care and tackling the backlog in screening, diagnosis and treatment. And it's an enormous backlog. Professor Charlie Swanton, chief clinician of Cancer Research UK tells James Gallagher, the BBC's health and science correspondent, that 2.7 million people have missed out on cervical, breast and colorectal screening and 300,000 fewer people than normal have been referred under the urgent 2 week cancer pathway. The creation of Covid-free cancer hubs, he says, safe zones for cancer treatment, are vital, but it will still take a long time to recover and of course there's the spectre of a second wave of coronavirus which would disrupt services all over again. Confidence building includes rapid Covid-19 testing for staff and Dr Trevor Smith from Southampton tells James about the saliva test pilot for key workers in the city. The new test just involves putting saliva in a sample pot, much easier than the normal "have you got it" swab test which involves wiping the back of the throat and deep inside the nose. Dr Navjoyt Ladher, GP and Head of Education at the British Medical Journal gives a simple guide to the "have you got it" tests: PCR, antigen and perhaps if the trial is a success, the new saliva test as well as the "have you had it tests"; the antibody tests. And finally in the week that in England at least, guidance for those who are "clinically vulnerable" and shielding on the advice of the government changes, Inside Health's Dr Margaret McCartney reviews the new advice for those in all four nations of the UK. Producer: Fiona Hill
Toilet
Discovery BBC
access_time1 month ago
You may call it the toilet, the loo, the privy, the potty, the can or even the bathroom, but whatever you call it, this everyday object has its roots in Bronze Age Pakistan. It even had a seat! But how did the toilet come to be? Given one third of the world’s population still live without one, how much is our embarrassment around toilet habits to blame? And what scientific developments are underway to help make them truly universal? Water and Sanitation Expert, Alison Parker, from Cranfield University believes part of the solution lies in a waterless toilet which creates ash, water from the waste it receives, and the energy it needs to operate, from the waste it receives. Even in the UK, we don’t always have access to a toilet when we need one. Over the past decade, the number of public conveniences has dropped by a half, leaving older people and the disabled, who may need easy access, unable to leave their homes. Raymond Martin, Managing Director of the British Toilet Association, hopes to stop our public conveniences going down the pan. Also featuring resident public historian Greg Jenner. Producer: Beth Eastwood Picture: Bathroom/Getty Images
Covid-19 and children
The Science Hour BBC
access_time1 month ago
Studies in children who have been severely affected by Covid-19 in Italy, Britain and the US are showing the same thing – a range of symptoms linked to an overactive immune system. Elizabeth Whittaker from London’s Imperial College discusses the similarities in these cases and possible reasons for this syndrome with Shanna Kowalsky from Mount Sinai hospital in New York. How much should drugs for Covid-19 cost? Remdesivir, which has shown promise against the virus, has been priced at over $2000 for a course of treatment, but drug price analyst Andrew Hill says the cost of production is actually below $10. And how about some really alternative energy? Marion Cromb at Glasgow University has run an experiment to simulate a spinning black hole. In theory, a rocket sent to an equivalent real black hole could use its rotation as a power source. Shoes are a surprisingly recent human invention. But running isn’t. That means for most of our time on the planet, we’ve run barefoot. Today, in most countries, it’s rare to see people out in public without shoes, let alone running. But might our aversion to the free foot be causing us pain? CrowdScience mega-fan Hnin is an experienced runner - she enjoys ultra-marathons back home in Australia. But about six months ago she developed extreme foot pain, the condition Plantar Fasciitis, and this meant she had to stop doing what she loves. She reached out to CrowdScience presenter Chhavi Sachdev, to find out if barefoot running could reduce her pain and improve her performance. Simply put, is barefoot running better? In an attempt to find Hnin some answers, Chhavi hits the ground… running. Literally throwing off her own shoes on the streets of her home city of Mumbai, India, to see how feeling the ground can change her whole gait. And with Prof. Dan Lieberman, Chhavi learns what sets the human runner apart from other species, while uncovering the strange form our feet have. She speaks with Dr Peter Francis, a researcher whose life’s work has focused on curing the pain in his own feet and learning how to help others. But performance is also important for runners. Biomechanics and shoe expert Dr Sharon Dixon explains how modifications to the sports-shoe are helping marathon runners set records, and blade-running athlete Kiran Kanojia shows Chhavi how the technology behind her two prosthetic legs let her emulate either natural walking or natural running. (Image: Getty Images)
PSYCHOLOGY OF SOCIAL-MEDIA | What your emptiness and loneliness says about you | Psychology in Hindi
Psychology In Hindi Saurabh Gandhi
access_time1 month ago
The rise of social media has meant that we as a global population are more connected than we have ever been in the history of time. However, our reliance on social media can have a detrimental effect on our mental health. But is social-media bad for everyone? Listen to this episode and find out. 📽️FIND US ON YOUTUBE: WWW.YOUTUBE.COM/PSYCHOLOGYINHINDI
21:  Climate Change and water I An interview with Aditi Mukherji I Sustainable agriculture
In this episode, host Bibek Bhattacharya talks about the uneven monsoon rainfall and speaks with water expert Aditi Mukherji on India's groundwater, sustainable agriculture practices, and much more.
Covid -19 and Children
Science in Action BBC
access_time1 month ago
Studies in Children who have been severely affected by Covid 19 in Italy, Britain and the US are showing the same thing – a range of symptoms linked to an overactive immune system. Elizabeth Whittaker from London’s Imperial College discusses the similarities in these cases and possible reasons for this syndrome with Shanna Kowalsky from Mount Sinai hospital in New York. How much should drugs for Covid !9 cost? Remdesivir which has shown promise against the virus has been priced at over $2000 for a course of treatment, but Drug price analyst Andrew Hill says the cost of production is actually below $10. And how about some really alternative energy? Marion Cromb at Glasgow University has run an experiment to simulate a spinning black hole. In theory a rocket sent to an equivalent real black hole could use its rotation as a power source (Image: Getty Images) Presenter: Roland Pease Producer: Julian Siddle
Wine Glass
Discovery BBC
access_time1 month ago
Have you got one of those wine glasses that can hold an entire bottle of wine? Katy Brand does and she’s even used it for wine - albeit because of a sprained ankle, which would have stopped her from hobbling back and forth to the kitchen for refills. But if we skip back a few hundred years, the wine glass was tiny. Footmen brought their masters what was essentially a shot glass. They quaffed back their wine in one. So how did we go from those dinky little things to the gargantuan goblets we have today? Is it because letting the wine breathe in a bigger glass makes it smell and taste better? Or is it a reflection of our drinking habits? Join Katy and the show's resident public historian, Greg Jenner, is glass expert Russell Hand from Sheffield University and Barry Smith, Director for the Study of the Senses at London University. Producer: Graihagh Jackson Picture: Wine glass, Credit: Albina Kosenko/Getty Images
How to develop wisdom | Psychology in Hindi
Psychology In Hindi Saurabh Gandhi
access_time1 month ago
Wisdom is a virtue that isn't innate, but can only be acquired through experience. Anyone who is interested in trying new things and reflecting on the process has the ability to gain wisdom. Listen to the entire podcast segment to learn more all the steps necessary to become a wise person. 📽️FIND US ON YOUTUBE: WWW.YOUTUBE.COM/PSYCHOLOGYINHINDI
Record high temperatures – in the Arctic
The Science Hour BBC
access_time1 month ago
A record summer temperature in Siberia is an indication of major changes in the Arctic climate. Changing weather patterns there have a knock on effect for other parts of the planet says Climatologist Steve Vavrus Chile appeared to get Covid-19 under control, but in reality the virus was spreading uncontrollably through poor areas, As we hear from our correspondent in Santiago Jane Chambers, the lockdown has tightened but cases continue to rise. And could mass testing using new saliva tests help control or even end the epidemic? Epidemiologist Julian Peto tells us about his plan which is designed to contain the virus within individual households and stop community spread. Experiments to investigate dark matter have produced some tantalising results, Physicist Laura Manenti says it’s not confirmation of detection, but potentially close. If you put one person’s blood into another person , sometimes it’s fine and sometimes it’s a death sentence. French physician Jean-Baptiste Denis discovered this when he performed the first blood transfusion back in 1667. He put the blood of a lamb into a 15-year boy. The teenager survived but Denis’s third attempt killed the patient and led to a murder charge. In 1900, Austrian doctor Karl Landsteiner discovered the reason for this lottery – blood types. The red blood cells in our bodies are decorated with different marker molecules called antigens. These define us as A, B, AB or O blood type. And this is just one of 38 different systems for classifying our blood. CrowdScience listeners have discovered that we aren’t the only animal with blood types and want to know more. Dogs have 12 different blood groups, so how do they cope when they need a transfusion? CrowdScience meets some very good dogs who donate a pint to the pet blood bank in return for a toy and a treat. Each pint saving up to 4 other dogs’ lives. We also hear how examining our blood types can tell us more about our links to our ape-like cousins and how the human species spread around the world. And what about the future of blood types – can we use science, and animal blood to get around the problems of transfusions? (Image: Rural Scene in Verkhoyansk. Credit: Dean Conger/Corbis via Getty Images)
S01E00 Understanding Why It's Kritikal!
It's Kritikal! kritika singh
access_time1 month ago
Welcome to It's Kritikal! instagram - @ItsKritikalPodcast Twitter - @itskritikalpod Website - www.itskritikal.com
S01 Infinity Episode [Hindi] National Animal Rights Day!
It's Kritikal! kritika singh
access_time1 month ago
On National Animal Rights Day, here is a short video on my perspective of why this matters to me.
S01E01 Coping Up: Mental Health & Physical Wellbeing x Ayan Jeloka & Nishkarsha B.
It's Kritikal! kritika singh
access_time1 month ago
*Thank you for listening to this episode. We understand the audio quality isn't great and we are working on solving the issues. We hope that the content keeps you glued. :) Our host Kritika Singh is in conversation with Ayan Jeloka, a young IT professional and Nishkarsha Bangarigadu, a teacher and psychologist discussing the importance of mental health and physical wellbeing.  To learn more: https://bit.ly/S01E01IK  To follow Ayan Jeloka's Podcast: https://bit.ly/overperformingunderdogsA Illustration by: https://bit.ly/SidBishnu Follow us: https://linktr.ee/ItsKritikal
S01E02 Domestic Violence: The Silent Pandemic (1/2) x Anika Verma & Lakshmi Ayyagari
It's Kritikal! kritika singh
access_time1 month ago
Part 1 of 2 Kritika Singh in conversation with Anika Verma, a Women Rights Activist and Lakshmi Ayyagari, a Counselling Psychologist on how domestic violence has become a silent pandemic during the COVID-19 lockdown globally. To find out the zonal helpline numbers for India, visit: https://bit.ly/InBreakthrough Visit our social media pages here: https://linktr.ee/ItsKritikal To become a Patreon, visit: https://bit.ly/37AQlZj
S01E02 Domestic Violence: The Silent Pandemic (2/2) x Anika Verma& Lakshmi Ayyagari
It's Kritikal! kritika singh
access_time1 month ago
Part 2 of 2 Kritika Singh in conversation with Anika Verma, a Women Rights Activist and Lakshmi Ayyagari, a Counselling Psychologist on how domestic violence has become a silent pandemic during the COVID-19 lockdown globally. To find out the zonal helpline numbers for India, visit: https://bit.ly/InBreakthrough Visit our social media pages here: https://linktr.ee/ItsKritikal To become a Patreon, visit: https://bit.ly/37AQlZj
The Evidence: Covid 19: vaccines and after lockdown
Discovery BBC
access_time1 month ago
Claudia Hammond and a panel of international experts look at the latest research into Covid-19, the disease caused by the new coronavirus which is sweeping through the world. We look at vaccines to stop the spread of the coronavirus. And as travel opens up in many countries and visiting family and friends is allowed, how do we navigate this new world while avoiding catching the virus. On the panel are Dr George Hu, clinical psychologist & Section Chief of Mental Health at Shanghai United Family Pudong Hospital in China, Vaccine expert - Professor Gagandeep Kang Executive Director of the Translational Health Science Technology Institute in Faridabad India, Dr Jenny Rohn is an expert in microbiology and viruses at University College London and Dr Margaret Harris, a Spokesperson at the World Health Organisation. The Evidence is produced in association with Wellcome Collection. Producers: Geraldine Fitzgerald and Caroline Steel Editor: Deborah Cohen
20: India's climate change risks I In conversation with Arunabha Ghosh I India's energy future
In this episode, host Bibek Bhattacharya speaks with Dr. Arunabha Ghosh of CEEW on India's energy future, mapping risks, international cooperation and much more.
Record high temperatures – in the Arctic
Science in Action BBC
access_time1 month ago
A record summer temperature in Siberia is an indication of major changes in the Arctic climate. Changing weather patterns there have a knock on effect for other parts of the planet says Climatologist Steve Vavrus Chile appeared to get Covid-19 under control, but in reality the virus was spreading uncontrollably through poor areas, As we hear from our correspondent in Santiago Jane Chambers, the lockdown has tightened but cases continue to rise. And could mass testing using new saliva tests help control or even end the epidemic? Epidemiologist Julian Peto tells us about his plan which is designed to contain the virus within individual households and stop community spread. Experiments to investigate dark matter have produced some tantalising results, Physicist Laura Manenti says it’s not confirmation of detection, but potentially close. (Image: Rural Scene in Verkhoyansk. Credit: Dean Conger/Corbis via Getty Images) Presenter: Roland Pease Producer: Julian Siddle