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Gujarati Science & Medicine Podcast

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Fewer periods, The link between erectile dysfunction and the heart
Inside Health BBC
access_time2 hours ago
It’s time to talk about periods and contraception. Different birth control options alter the menstrual cycle. Journalist Nicola Davis tells me about her decade without periods and our resident GP Margaret McCartney and sexual health doctor Julia Bailey discuss the evidence and what you need to know. We’ve also got vaccination expert Adam Finn to discuss the slowdown in young people getting the Covid-19 jab and cardiologist Rohin Francis explores the link between erectile dysfunction and the heart. PRESENTER: James Gallagher PRODUCER: Geraldine Fitzgerald & Beth Eastwood
Dare To Repair: Fixing the future
Discovery BBC
access_time1 day ago
Mark Miodownik, explores the environmental consequences of the throwaway society we have become and reveals that recycling electronic waste comes second to repairing broken electronics. He asks what we can learn from repair cultures around the world , he looks at manufacturers who are designing in repair-ability, and discovers the resources available to encourage and train the next generation of repairers. Image: Teen boy solders wires to build robot, Credit: SDI Productions/Getty Images Producer: Fiona Roberts
7 Biggest Mysteries of Subconcious Mind - अवचेतन मन के PSYCHOLOGICAL FACTS
Psychology In Hindi Saurabh Gandhi
access_time3 days ago
Subconscious mind is one of the biggest mysteries that science is trying to solve. Where the conscious mind is that which we are aware of, the subconscious mind is that part of our mind that operates below our awareness, hence we don't have direct access to. That's why in this podcast segment, we will talk about the most amazing and mysterious psychological facts about the subconscious mind and some tips on how to program it to use its power.
Your molecular machinery, now in 3D
The Science Hour BBC
access_time3 days ago
Back in November it was announced that an AI company called DeepMind had near enough cracked the problem of protein folding - that is they had managed to successfully predict the 3D structures of complex biochemical molecules by only knowing the 2D sequence of amino acids from which they are made. They are not the only team to use machine learning to approach the vast amounts of data involved. But only last week, they released the source code and methodology behind their so called AlphaFold 2 tool for free. And today they have published, via a paper in the journal Nature, a simply huge database of predicted structures including most of the human proteome, and 20 other model species such as yeast and mice. The possibilities for any biochemists are very exciting. As DeepMind CEO Demis Hassabis tells Roland Pease, they partnered with the European Molecular Biology Laboratory to make over 350,000 of these protein predictions available to researchers around the world free of charge and open-sourced. Dr Benjamin Perry of the Drugs for Neglected Diseases Initiative told us how it may help in the search for urgently needed drugs for difficult illnesses such as Chagas disease. Prof John McGeehan of the Centre for Enzyme Innovation at Portsmouth University in the UK is on the search for enzymes that might be used to digest otherwise pollutant plastics. He received results (that would have taken years using more traditional methods) back from the AlphaFold team in just a couple of days. Prof Julia Gog of Cambridge University is a biomathematician who has been modelling Covid epidemiology and behaviour. In a recent paper in Royal Society Open Science, she and colleagues wonder whether the vaccination strategy of jabbing the most vulnerable in a population first, rather than the most gregarious or mobile, is necessarily the optimal way to protect them. Should nations still at an early stage in vaccine rollout consider her model? And did you know that elephants can hear things up to a kilometre away through their feet? And that sometimes they communicate by bellowing and rumbling such that the ground shakes? Dr Beth Mortimer of Oxford University has been planting seismic detectors in savannah in Kenya to see if they can tap into the elephant messaging network, to possibly help conservationists track their movements. Also, One listener finds herself unconcerned about much of the world’s problems, it leaves her wondering: am I a psychopath? Inspired by a previous episode on empathy, this listener asked is it true that psychopaths don’t empathise and what are the character traits of psychopathy? Marnie Chesterton talks with a diagnosed pro-social psychopath to find out. She also pays a visit to the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience and gets into an MRI scanner to discover what is happening in her brain when she empathises. Studies suggest around 1 percent of the general population exhibit traits associated with psychopathy and that rises to 3-4 percent in the world of business. But is this really the case? Why is there so much stigma associated with psychopathy and do psychopaths even exist or is it just a convenient term to label those whose emotional range sits outside of the “norm”? Presented by Marnie Chesterton and produced by Caroline Steel for the BBC World Service. Guests: Julia Shaw Jim Fallon Valeria Gazzola Kalliopi Ioumpa Image: Protein folding Credit: Nicolas_/iStock/Getty Images
Your molecular machinery, now in 3D
Science in Action BBC
access_time5 days ago
Back in November it was announced that an AI company called DeepMind had essentially cracked the problem of protein folding – that is they had managed to successfully predict the 3D structures of complex biochemical molecules by only knowing the 2D sequence of amino acids from which they are made. They are not the only team to use machine learning to approach the vast amounts of data involved. But last week, they released the source code and methodology behind their so called AlphaFold2 tool. Today, they are publishing via a paper in the journal Nature, a simply huge database of predicted structures including most of the human proteome and 20 other model species such as yes, mice. The possibilities for any biochemists are very exciting. As DeepMind CEO Demis Hassabis tells Roland Pease, they partnered with the European Molecular Biology Laboratory to make over 350,000 protein predictions available to researchers around the world free of charge and open sourced. Dr Benjamin Perry of the Drugs for Neglected Diseases Initiative told us how it may help in the search for urgently needed drugs for difficult diseases such as Chagas disease. Prof John McGeehan of the Centre for Enzyme Innovation at Portsmouth University in the UK is on the search for enzymes that might be used to digest otherwise pollutant plastics. He received results (that would have taken years using more traditional methods) back from the AlphaFold team in just a couple of days. Prof Julia Gog of Cambridge University is a biomathematician who has been modelling Covid epidemiology and behaviour. In a recent paper in Royal Society Open Science, she and colleagues wonder whether the vaccination strategy of jabbing the most vulnerable in a population first, rather than the most gregarious or mobile, is necessarily the optimal way to protect them. Should nations still at an early stage in vaccine rollout consider her model? And did you know that elephants can hear things up to a kilometre away through their feet? And that sometimes they communicate by bellowing and rumbling such the ground shakes? Dr Beth Mortimer of Oxford University has been planting seismic detectors in savannah in Kenya to see if they can tap into the elephant messaging network, to possibly help conservationists track their movements. Image: Protein folding Credit: Nicolas_/iStock/Getty Images Presenter: Roland Pease Producers: Alex Mansfield and Samara Linton
Emotionless होना बेवकूफ़ी है (Especially for Men)
Psychology In Hindi Saurabh Gandhi
access_time6 days ago
Our emotions are autonomous reactions on external or internal stimuli that may urge us to take an action. But sometimes our emotions, instead of helping and guiding us, start distracting us. You may experience a heartbreak or lose your job, and your emotions will always make you feel the worst, so you decide that you don't want to feel anything and you want to become emotionless. But this is the most immature and stupid thing that you can do to yourself. Being emotionless is like rejecting your own self and everything that it consists i.e. your personality, thoughts, beliefs and your being. So, in this podcast segment, we will discuss if being emotionless is not the right move then what should we be doing.
When to take your child to A&E, ear wax and happiness
Inside Health BBC
access_time7 days ago
Time for a sprinkling of happiness with a new exhibition at the Wellcome Collection. Last time we heard how children's A&E is under huge pressure as infections, that disappeared during Covid, make a comeback. But doctors also warn that many of those children shouldn’t actually be there. Damian Roland a paediatrician in emergency medicine at University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust busts the myths about fever and gives tips on when to take your child to A&E. And the wonders of ear wax, until it builds up, that is, as it does for me. But it's not just ear wax that nurse Andrew Hill has found in people's ears - cocaine and spiders too. You get it all here on Inside Health. PRESENTER: James Gallagher PRODUCERS: Beth Eastwood & Geraldine Fitzgerald
Dare to repair: The fight for the right to repair
Discovery BBC
access_time8 days ago
Many electronics manufacturers are making it harder for us, to fix our broken kit. There are claims that programmed obsolescence is alive and well, with mobile phone batteries designed to wear out after just 400 charges. They claim it's for safety or security reasons, but it pushes constant replacement and upgrades. But people are starting to fight back. Mark Miodownik talks to the fixers and repairers who are heading up the Right to Repair movement which is forcing governments to act, and making sustainability and value for money part of the consumer equation. Producer: Fiona Roberts (Photo: A pile of discarded computer circuit board. Credit: Tara Moore/Getty Images)
Science when the funding dries up
The Science Hour BBC
access_time10 days ago
This week the UK parliament voted to accept the Government’s continued cap on Official Development Aid. This disappointed many researchers around the world, funded directly and indirectly through various scientific funding structures enabling international collaboration on some of the global challenges facing all of us. These funding mechanisms make for a small fraction of the overall amount, but they have been hit hard, with many projects closing altogether. There had been hope amongst the scientific community that the cap – from 0.7% down to 0.5% of the UK’s Gross Domestic Income – might have been in place just for a year. But it seems like the criteria set to judge when the level of aid might rise again imply that it is unlikely to happen for several years at the earliest. What, asks Science in Action, does that mean to the world of scientific collaboration on such topics as climate change, contagious disease, and emergency planning? Researchers Chris Trisos and Jenni Barclay, with journalist Robin Bisson of Research Professional News, update us on the story. Also, In Zambia, where covid testing remains scarce, a project run by Boston University’s Christopher Gill has been estimating the prevalence of covid in the capital Lusaka by taking nasal swab samples from the noses of around one in five of those recently deceased, in the morgue of a major hospital. Tantalisingly, his team have seen over the last few months a sharp rise in cases to the extent that in June, nearly 90 percent of the cadavers tested positive for covid. But as Chris describes, unrelated to the UK cuts, their funding has now run out, so where the graph leads from here we may not learn for a long time. Anyone who has ever taken the Christmas lights out of the cupboard, only to discover they’re hopelessly tangled, will sympathise with this week’s listener Eric. He has a 45m garden hose that always seems to snarl up and snag when he waters his garden, and he wonders what he’s doing wrong? Marnie starts by discovering the important difference between tangles and knots, as she scales a cliff with an experienced climber who explains the way you tie rope is a matter of life and death. Physicists are also fascinated in how string becomes jumbled up and one man has even won an IgNobel award for his work in this field. Doug E Smith discovered that if you put a piece of string in a box then spin it around, its length, thickness and how long you shake the box for, all determine whether it will tie itself up. Not only that, the more the string becomes twisted, the more likely it is to cross over itself and become impossible to untangle. While tangles might be annoying in hair or cables, they’re also a fundamental part of human life. Our DNA is constantly folding itself to fit inside tiny spaces – there are two metres of the stuff inside every cell, where it’s packed down tightly, before it must untangle and duplicate for those cells to divide. It does this with the help of specific enzymes, and when the process goes wrong it leads to cell death. But scientists are also studying molecular tangles that might benefit us humans, and creating nano-sized knots that can be turned into nets or meshes with incredible properties. (Image: Getty Images)
Science when the funding dries up
Science in Action BBC
access_time12 days ago
This week the UK parliament voted to accept the Government’s continued cap on Official Development Aid. This disappointed many researchers around the world, funded directly and indirectly through various scientific funding structures enabling international collaboration on some of the global challenges facing all of us. These funding mechanisms make for a small fraction of the overall amount, but they have been hit hard, with many projects closing altogether. There had been hope amongst the scientific community that the cap – from 0.7% down to 0.5% of the UK’s Gross Domestic Income – might have been in place just for a year. But it seems like the criteria set to judge when the level of aid might rise again imply that it is unlikely to happen for several years at the earliest. What, asks science in action, does that mean to the world of scientific collaboration on such topics as climate change, contagious disease, and emergency planning? Researchers Chris Trysos, and Jenni Barclay, with journalist Robin Bisson of Research Professional News, update us on the story. In Zambia, where covid testing remains scarce, a project run by Boston University’s Christopher Gill has been estimating the prevalence of covid in the capital Lusaka by taking swabs from the noses of around 1 in 5 people in the morgue of a major hospital. Tantalisingly, they have been seeing a sharp rise in cases to the extent that in June, nearly 1 in 5 of the cadavers tested positive. But as Chris describes, unrelated to the UK cuts, their funding has now run out, so where the graph leads from here we may not learn for a long time. Presented by Roland Pease Produced by Alex Mansfield. (Image: Getty Images) Presenter: Roland Pease Producer: Alex Mansfield
If You Miss Someone - WATCH THIS
Psychology In Hindi Saurabh Gandhi
access_time12 days ago
Not every relationship is permanent. Sometimes you have to leave your friends behind because they aren't letting you success, you may have to break up with your partner whom you deeply love or you may lose a relative or a parent. This coming and going of people in our lives is natural. But what is unnatural is the way we obsess over the absence of our old lovers or anyone else. The more we miss our ex, parent or friend, the more we suffer. That's why in this podcast segment, we will understand why we miss someone, what is love, how to overcome our attachments to others, and how do we get to such a position where we no longer suffer because of our past.
9 Psychological Facts About Human-Behavior
Psychology In Hindi Saurabh Gandhi
access_time12 days ago
Understanding of Psychology comes with its own perks. Once you understand how and why humans behave the way they do, you can navigate through awkward situations, get a raise, make more sales, help others, be more successful, make more money, influence people, improve your quality of life and more. By using these Psychological hacks you'll be able to not only communicate well and make better social connections but you'll also become happier, increase your productivity, improve your health and learn/study faster. We have discussed 9 simple but shocking psychological facts and tricks that will increase your knowledge of psychology and human behavior.
The missing 96 percent of the universe | Claire Malone
TEDTalks Science and Medicine TEDTalks
access_time13 days ago
We've misplaced the building blocks of the cosmos -- and particle physicists like Claire Malone are on a mission to find them. Despite scientists hitting a "major snag" in uncovering what exactly makes up dark matter and dark energy, she explains how questioning our fundamental understanding of nature itself invites a different, more meaningful perspective universally.
Increase in childhood viruses and can you be too fit?
Inside Health BBC
access_time14 days ago
Here at Team Inside Health we’ve noticed our children are constantly ill. So we find out why. Are all those bugs that were dormant for the pandemic suddenly having a resurgence? Or has a year and a half of being squeaky clean left a lingering impact on our immune system? Plus Medlife Crisis - Rohin Frances asks can you be too fit?
Dare to Repair: How we broke the future
Discovery BBC
access_time15 days ago
Materials engineer Professor Mark Miodownik looks back to the start of the electronics revolution to find out why our electronic gadgets and household goods are less durable and harder to repair now. As he attempts to fix his digital clock radio, he reveals that the drive for cheaper stuff and advances in design and manufacturing have left us with a culture of throwaway technology and mountains of electronic waste. Image: Apron housewife at kitchen dish washer, Credit: George Marks/Getty Images Producer: Fiona Roberts
10 Life Lessons From Swami Vivekananda
Psychology In Hindi Saurabh Gandhi
access_time15 days ago
Swami Vivekananda was a Hindu monk and a Spiritual teacher who popularized many of the Indian philosophies like Vedanta and Yoga. He had a deep understanding of both science and religion, which is why, both coexisted in his teachings. So, in this podcast segment, we will talk about 10 life lessons from one of the greatest Spiritual Gurus which will teach you how to enhance your growth potential, control your emotions, be mentally tough, spread love and be successful in all areas of your life.
How To Overcome Shame - शर्मिंदगी मेहसूस करने का DEEP कारण
Psychology In Hindi Saurabh Gandhi
access_time15 days ago
"Shame is a soul eating emotion" said Swiss Psychiatrist Carl Jung. When we're feeling shame, we aren't focusing on our dreams, we can't solve any problem, we don't have time to think about success as our mind is totally consumed by the urge to hide our flaws. This is the problem with shame i.e. it makes you secretive and self critical. So, in this podcast segment, we will talk about what shame is and how we can overcome it using psychology.
Human induced climate change heats up fast
The Science Hour BBC
access_time17 days ago
Scientists say the record-breaking Pacific North-West heatwave of recent weeks must have been caused by human induced climate change, but as Geert Jan van Oldenborgh explains to Roland Pease, despite a herculean effort to analyse the event in just a week, the precise mechanism to cause such an extreme and sudden event is so far bewildering climate modellers, exceeding even worst expectations. Looking to the skies, Rosita Kokotanekova of the European Southern Observatory and colleagues have been getting excited about the discovery of a comet maybe twice as large as any observed before. Being so big, it has been spotted much further out from the sun and – if the best telescopes can be convinced to join the fun – will provide astronomers a chance to observe the core of the comet before the solar heat induces a gaseous coma to form as it nears the point in its orbit closest to the sun. It will be around for the next decade before continuing its several million year journey around our mutual star. But it won’t get terribly close to earth, at least not as close as lumps of an asteroid that fell onto a driveway in the UK earlier this year. Dr Ashley King of the UK’s Natural History Museum is leading a consortium of scientists (benefitting from a rapid research grant by the UK’s STFC) who have now officially classified it and named it. The Winchcombe meteorite is a CM carbonaceous chondrite, meaning it represents the unspoilt early building blocks of the solar system. Falling like 4.5 billion year old leftover celestial lego, only a few are known around the world but perhaps none have been in scientists hands in such a short period of time, continuing its pristine survival. Dr Pablo Tsukayama has published a preprint paper announcing a new variant of interest in the ongoing evolution of the SARS-CoV2 virus. Now named by the WHO as the Lambda variant, it seems it has driven the pandemic for much of this year in Peru – as much as 80% of cases – and large fractions of the outbreak elsewhere in South America. But as Pablo suggests, the reason we don’t know as much about it as for example the Alpha or Delta variants is likely because it hasn’t thus far affected the countries best equipped to do the analysis. Maybe that could change. Standing takes less energy than walking, so why does it feel more tiring? At least, it does for CrowdScience listener Nina. She can march for hours without getting tired, but her legs and feet get achy after just a short time standing still. It’s one of three walking-themed questions CrowdScience is tackling this week. Taking inspiration from our active listeners, Marnie Chesterton walks up a hill with Caroline Williams, author of a new book about why humans are designed to move. We find out how our whole system – body and brain – works better when we’re walking, compared to standing still. We’re probably set up this way because of our evolutionary history: hunting and gathering needed us to be ‘cognitively engaged endurance athletes’. We stop for a break.. but is it true that we shouldn’t sit down to rest during a walk? Our listener Sarah is a keen hillwalker but likes to take the weight off her feet every now and again. Her hillwalking friends disapprove, saying she should rest on her feet. Is this a myth CrowdScience can bust? And finally a question from listener Matteo: is walking or running better for your health? Numerous studies show significant benefits to both forms of exercise, but in the end, the best kind of exercise is the one you’re motivated to do. Image: Wildfires in Lytton, British Columbia Credit: ProPics Canada Media Ltd/Getty Images
Human induced climate change heats up fast
Science in Action BBC
access_time19 days ago
Scientists say the record-breaking Pacific North-West heatwave of recent weeks must have been caused by human induced climate change, but as Geert Jan van Oldenborgh explains to Roland Pease, despite a herculean effort to analyse the event in just a week, the precise mechanism to cause such an extreme and sudden event is so far bewildering climate modellers, exceeding even worst expectations. Looking to the skies, Rosita Kokotanekova of the European Southern Observatory and colleagues have been getting excited about the discovery of a comet maybe twice as large as any observed before. Being so big, it has been spotted much further out from the sun and – if the best telescopes can be convinced to join the fun – will provide astronomers a chance to observe the core of the comet before the solar heat induces a gaseous coma to form as it nears the point in its orbit closest to the sun. It will be around for the next decade before continuing its several million year journey around our mutual star. But it won’t get terribly close to earth, at least not as close as lumps of an asteroid that fell onto a driveway in the UK earlier this year. Dr Ashley King of the UK’s Natural History Museum is leading a consortium of scientists (benefitting from a rapid research grant by the UK’s STFC) who have now officially classified it and named it. The Winchcombe meteorite is a CM carbonaceous chondrite, meaning it represents the unspoilt early building blocks of the solar system. Falling like 4.5 billion year old leftover celestial lego, only a few are known around the world but perhaps none have been in scientists hands in such a short period of time, continuing its pristine survival. Dr Pablo Tsukayama has published a preprint paper announcing a new variant of interest in the ongoing evolution of the SARS-CoV2 virus. Now named by the WHO as the Lambda variant, it seems it has driven the pandemic for much of this year in Peru – as much as 80% of cases – and large fractions of the outbreak elsewhere in South America. But as Pablo suggests, the reason we don’t know as much about it as for example the Alpha or Delta variants is likely because it hasn’t thus far affected the countries best equipped to do the analysis. Maybe that could change. Image: Wildfires in Lytton, British Columbia Credit: ProPics Canada Media Ltd/Getty Images Presenter: Roland Pease Producer: Alex Mansfield
10 Signs You're Doing Better Than You Think
Psychology In Hindi Saurabh Gandhi
access_time20 days ago
Whenever we see others, whether it be our friends or a stranger on social media doing better than us, we think that we are far behind everybody else and we are losing this game. When such a thought arrives in our head, we forget our own talents, achievements and how far we have come along in our own journey. This is in this podcast segment, we will discuss 10 signs that you are better than you think.
How to defeat needle phobia, and football and lateral flow tests
Inside Health BBC
access_time21 days ago
The Inside Health podcast is back with a bang! Find out how having a couple of mates round for the football trapped scientist Alex Crozier inside a Covid experiment. Laura talks us through her remarkable journey from a fear of needles to having her Covid jab and Oxford University’s Daniel Freeman has some tips for you too. We’ve unleashed our cardiologist, Rohin Francis, for the first of his “Roving Rohin” (trademark pending) reports on hospital staff who don’t get the vaccine. And GP Navjoyt Ladher shares her insight on where we’re at with the pandemic. Happy listening.
Tooth and claw: Tigers
Discovery BBC
access_time22 days ago
“As it charges towards you, you can actually feel the drumbeat of its feet falling to the ground”. Nothing quite says fear more than standing before a charging tiger. Yet so often it’s also the poster-predator for conservation. The tiger truly is the ‘prince of the jungle’.. The good news (to some) is that after a century of decline, wild tiger populations have increased recently. But with this comes the increase in human fatalities – there are almost daily attacks on the rural poor across India. A world without wild tigers is not a world we want, but how do we balance the needs of people and the needs of tigers? Adam finds out more about tigers and the people that live around them by speaking with Indian tiger expert Rajeev Matthews and conservation biologist Samantha Helle, who is based in the US and works with communities and tigers in Nepal. Producer: Rami Tzabar and Beth Eastwood Presenter: Professor Adam Hart (Photo: A crouching tiger, Credit: Yudik Pradnyana/Getty Images)
6
Psychology In Hindi Saurabh Gandhi
access_time22 days ago
Our habits can either make us or break us. It is said that we are creature of habits, just because any task that we repeat enough times get wired in our psyche and becomes our second nature. That's why we can train ourselves to achieve success, make money, be more confident, or become a better human being. Just like good habits can help us improve ourselves, bad habits are enough to ruin our life. That's why in this podcast segment, we will talk about 6 modern habits that are detrimental to your success and growth.
10 Life Lessons From Dr. Carl Jung
Psychology In Hindi Saurabh Gandhi
access_time23 days ago
Swiss Psychiatrist Dr. Carl Jung not only contributed a lot in the field of psychology but he also influenced areas like philosophy, theology, spirituality, astrology and even hard science. Having knowledge from so many different fields of study, he was able to find patterns that were common across them and based his theories on those findings. So, in this podcast segment, we will discuss Jung's 10 life lessons that will not only teach a lot about Jungian Psychology but you will also learn a lot about the right way of living life.
Insects in incredible detail
The Science Hour BBC
access_time23 days ago
The Natural History Museum in London holds a massive collection of insects. It asked researchers at the Diamond light source, a facility near Oxford, to develop a high throughput X-ray microscope to take 3D scans of them all. Roland Pease has been to see the new technology in action. Many people seeking compensation for the impacts of climate change are turning to the law courts. Successes so far have been few. Oxford University’s Friederike Otto, who specialises in connecting weather extremes to the greenhouse effect, has just published a paper looking at the challenge in bringing successful climate lawsuits. Spacecraft will be returning to Venus in the next decade with the recent approval of two NASA missions to the planet, and one from the European Space Agency, ESA. Philippa Mason of Imperial College is a planetary geologist on that mission, Envision. She plans to use radar to peer through that dense and interesting atmosphere to follow up evidence of volcanic activity and tectonics on the surface beneath. A few years ago synthetic biologist Jim Collins of Harvard found a way to spill the contents of biological cells onto … basically … blotting paper, in a way that meant by just adding water, all the biochemical circuitry could be brought back to life. With a bit of genetic engineering, it could be turned into a sensor to detect Ebola and Nipah viruses. His team have kept developing the idea, and this week they report success in a smart face mask that can detect SARS-CoV-2 in your breath. Also, Food. For all of us it is a basic necessity and for those lucky enough, it is something we spend a lot of time planning and enjoying. CrowdScience listeners certainly have a lot of food related questions; in this buffet of an episode Marnie Chesterton opens the fridge door to pick the tastiest. Starting with the seemingly simple question of what makes us feel hungry, and ending in outer-space, Marnie investigates flavour, nutrition and digestion. After a year when watching TV has become a core activity for many people stuck in their homes, one listener wants us to find out if eating food whilst watching the TV affects our perception of taste. We then journey to the skies and ask if it is true that food tastes blander on aeroplanes, what does that mean for astronauts’ mealtimes? Back on earth, Marnie explores whether humans are the only animals that season their food. Tuck in your napkins and prepare to feast on a smorgasbord of scientific snacks. (Image: Hairy Fungus Beetle - Prepared by Malte Storm. Credit: Diamond light Source Ltd)
How To Overcome Fear
Psychology In Hindi Saurabh Gandhi
access_time24 days ago
Fear is one of our most primitive emotions and it is a biochemical reaction to a threatening stimulus that has the potential to harm us. This emotion was evolved to protect our life, but in the modern world, we fear the most harmless things because our brain doesn't know the different between a deadly predator and pending homework as both scenarios can be labelled as dangerous or something worth paying attention to. That's why in this podcast segment, we will understand the most effective to overcome fear and we will talk deeply about what fear actually is.
Insects in incredible detail
Science in Action BBC
access_time26 days ago
The Natural History Museum in London holds a massive collection of insects. It asked researchers at the Diamond light source, a facility near Oxford, to develop a high throughput X-ray microscope to take 3D scans of them all. Roland Pease has been to see the new technology in action. Many people seeking compensation for the impacts of climate change are turning to the law courts. Successes so far have been few. Oxford University’s Friederike Otto, who specialises in connecting weather extremes to the greenhouse effect, has just published a paper looking at the challenge in bringing successful climate lawsuits. Spacecraft will be returning to Venus in the next decade with the recent approval of two NASA missions to the planet, and one from the European Space Agency, ESA. Philippa Mason of Imperial College is a planetary geologist on that mission, Envision. She plans to use radar to peer through that dense and interesting atmosphere to follow up evidence of volcanic activity and tectonics on the surface beneath. A few years ago synthetic biologist Jim Collins of Harvard found a way to spill the contents of biological cells onto … basically … blotting paper, in a way that meant by just adding water, all the biochemical circuitry could be brought back to life. With a bit of genetic engineering, it could be turned into a sensor to detect Ebola and Nipah viruses. His team have kept developing the idea, and this week they report success in a smart face mask that can detect SARS-CoV-2 in your breath. (Image: Hairy Fungus Beetle - Prepared by Malte Storm. Credit: Diamond light Source Ltd) Presenter: Roland Pease Producer: Alex Mansfield
Psychology of Sacrifice
Psychology In Hindi Saurabh Gandhi
access_time27 days ago
The act of Sacrificing something of value is a really old idea and it says that if you give up something up of value in the name of the highest possible good that you can imagine, then your future will turn out better than the scenario where you didn't make that sacrifice. But why? Why is sacrificing your time, energy, love, money, etc for pursuing a greater good such a popular and deeply ingrained idea? In this podcast segment we will answer this question by discussing the psychology behind sacrifice, what is the best way to do it and how you can attract more success, peace and happiness in your own life through this knowledge.
Tooth And Claw: Bears
Discovery BBC
access_time29 days ago
Teddy bears might be popular with children but real bears are anything but cuddly. Brown, Black and Grizzly bears are the most well-known and have a well-deserved fearsome reputation. But for most part, bear attacks are not nearly as common as you might think. They’re solitary, curious and you’re unlikely to see one unless you’re really lucky – or unlucky depending on your point of view. So what should you do if you find yourself facing one in a forest? To learn more about these fascinating creatures, which can spend the winter months in a deep state of biological hibernation, Professor Adam Hart speaks to Dr Clayton Lamb from the University of British Columbia in Canada and Dr Giulia Bombieri from the Science Museum in Trento Italy about their work and experiences of these amazing beasts whose numbers are increasing in some parts of the world, leading to an increase of defensive attacks on people. Produced by Rami Tzabar and Beth Eastwood Presented by Professor Adam Hart. Picture: Brown bear, Credit: Szabo Ervin-Edward/EyeEm/Getty Images
13
Psychology In Hindi Saurabh Gandhi
access_time1 month ago
Understanding of Psychology comes with its own perks. Once you understand how and why humans behave the way they do, you can navigate through awkward situations, get a raise, make more sales, help others, be more successful, make more money, influence people, improve your quality of life and more. By using these Psychological hacks you'll be able to not only communicate well and make better social connections but you'll also become happier, increase your productivity, improve your health and learn/study faster. We have discussed 13 simple but rare psychological facts and tricks that will increase your knowledge of psychology and human behavior.
How the Modern World Is Making Us Mentally Ill - किस तरह Modern दुनिया हमे ज़्यादा दुखी बना रही है
Psychology In Hindi Saurabh Gandhi
access_time1 month ago
Modern world has its own perks, we have comfort, food, clean water and protection from wild animals. But what we don't have is psychological health. Compared to our ancestors, we are at a much better place physically, as our lives mostly don't require running for our life from a predator, but we are mentally weaker and more prone to psychological issues. Growing network of social media, our dependence on the internet to make money online, and our need to connect with people even virtually, all of these things tie together to give us a distorted version of what is really good for us. Every real joy has been replaced with a temporary and cheap pleasure and we're sacrificing our sanity and happiness for this. So, in this podcast segment, we will dive deeper into this modern problem and what is happening not only in the Indian society but all over the world.
Tales of unexpected DNA data
The Science Hour BBC
access_time1 month ago
This week Jesse Bloom of Seattle’s Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research has published an account of some DNA sequence data he located in an internet archive, despite it having been removed from the US NIH’s Sequence Read Archive. He tells Roland Pease of its significance to our understanding of the beginning of the Covid pandemic, but also, of more general interest, to what it might tell scientists about the full availability of relevant virological evidence. Elsewhere, Elena Zavala of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig has been using new techniques for sequencing tiny fragments of mitochondrial DNA found in layers of mud to trace a long narrative of different evolutionary species of human and animal and their changing fortunes. As she describes in a paper published in Nature, sediments from different depths of the floor of the famous Denisova cave tell a long story of different humans (Denisovan and Neanderthal), bears, hyenas and other animals living there over different periods in the last 250 thousand years. Over in the journal Science, several papers describe a new type of early hominin found in Nesher Rambla, Israel, that may be yet another instance of a human species that didn’t quite make it. As Marta Lahr, professor in human evolutionary biology at Cambridge University tells Roland the new findings all point to the bigger question – given the similar ages, technologies and even neighbourhoods that all these types of hominin shared, just what was it about our own direct ancestor species that enabled us to take over the world? Since almost the beginning of the Covid pandemic, in some parts of the world, the drug Ivermectin has been repurposed as a therapy against the disease, with some even believing it to convey protection against infection – a situation not without tragic consequences. The evidence for any meaningful effect has been less than obvious to most scientists and health authorities. Not the first controversial drug in the story of Covid-19, the discourse has led to abuse directed at scientists and officials, and scathing arguments across social media. As Oxford University’s PRINCIPLE trial this week begins to include Ivermectin in its investigations, BBC Reality Check’s Jack Goodman reports on the Ivermectin’s tortuous path. It took a while before it was officially recognised as a major symptom of Covid-19, but loss of smell has affected up to 60 percent of people who have had the virus. And for a significant portion, smell continues to be an issue for weeks or months after their recovery. So what’s going on and how can you get your sense of smell back? We tend to think of our sense of smell as something universal – if it smells bad to me, it probably does to you but that is not the case for CrowdScience listener Annabel, who wonders why things other people love to sniff, she finds disgusting. Anand Jagatia investigates the science of smell, gets up close to the world’s smelliest plant and finds out if smell training can help those with long-term issues after Covid. (Image: Getty Images)
The Evidence: How Covid damages the human body
Discovery BBC
access_time1 month ago
A year and a half in, and in many ways Covid-19 is still an enigma. All over the world, doctors and scientists are still struggling to understand exactly how this new virus undermines our defences and then damages, even destroys, our bodies, in so many different ways. And why are some people completely unaffected? In this edition of The Evidence, Claudia Hammond and her panel of experts chart the remarkable journey to understand this chameleon-like virus, including the long tail of the pandemic, Long Covid. Millions the world over are suffering under the dark shadow of post-Covid, with a multitude of symptoms months after the infection. Some of them, listeners to the programme, share their experiences. And, the background story of the world famous RECOVERY trial, set up at record speed in the UK (but now international) to test which treatments could save the lives of the sickest Covid patients. So far 10 treatments for Covid have been randomised and tested on thousands of patients and the results have shown that six, including the widely used and promoted hydroxychloroquine, make no difference to chances of surviving a hospital stay. While evidence that the cheap, widely-available steroid, dexamethasone, does work, and has so far saved more than a million lives world-wide. Joint chief investigator of RECOVERY, Sir Martin Landray, Professor of Medicine and Epidemiology at the University of Oxford, admits to Claudia that he’s been asked to include bee pollen and snake venom in the trial, but so far he’s resisted. Claudia’s expert panel also includes Professor K. Srinath Reddy, cardiologist and epidemiologist and President of the Public Health Institute of India; Dr Sherry Chou, intensivist and neurologist from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine who heads the Global Consortium Study on Neurological Dysfunction in Covid-19 (GCS-NeuroCOVID) and Dr Melissa Heightman, respiratory consultant and Clinical Lead for post-COVID services at University College London Hospitals. Produced by: Fiona Hill, Hannah Fisher and Maria Simons Studio Engineers: Donald MacDonald and Matilda Macari
Tales of unexpected DNA data
Science in Action BBC
access_time1 month ago
This week Jesse Bloom of Seattle’s Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research has published an account of some DNA sequence data he located in an internet archive, despite it having been removed from the US NIH’s Sequence Read Archive. He tells Roland Pease of its significance to our understanding of the beginning of the Covid pandemic, but also, of more general interest, to what it might tell scientists about the full availability of relevant virological evidence. Elsewhere, Elena Zavala of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig has been using new techniques for sequencing tiny fragments of mitochondrial DNA found in layers of mud to trace a long narrative of different evolutionary species of human and animal and their changing fortunes. As she describes in a paper published in Nature, sediments from different depths of the floor of the famous Denisova cave tell a long story of different humans (Denisovan and Neanderthal), bears, hyenas and other animals living there over different periods in the last 250 thousand years. Over in the journal Science, several papers describe a new type of early hominin found in Nesher Rambla, Israel, that may be yet another instance of a human species that didn’t quite make it. As Marta Lahr, professor in human evolutionary biology at Cambridge University tells Roland the new findings all point to the bigger question – given the similar ages, technologies, and even neighbourhoods that all these types of hominin shared, just what was it about our own direct ancestor species that enabled us to take over the world? Since almost the beginning of the Covid pandemic, in some parts of the world, the drug Ivermectin has been repurposed as a therapy against the disease, with some even believing it to convey protection against infection – a situation not without tragic consequences. The evidence for any meaningful effect has been less than obvious to most scientists and health authorities. Not the first controversial drug in the story of Covid-19, the discourse has led to abuse directed at scientists and officials, and scathing arguments across social media. As Oxford University’s PRINCIPLE trial this week begins to include Ivermectin in its investigations, BBC Reality Check’s Jack Goodman reports on the Ivermectin’s tortuous path. (Image: Getty Images) Presenter: Roland Pease Producer: Alex Mansfield
5 Signs You Are Wise
Psychology In Hindi Saurabh Gandhi
access_time1 month ago
Where intelligence is only a tool for survival, wisdom goes beyond this basic requirement and concerns itself with the satisfaction of life. This is why you see many successful people who are smart and seem to have it all, but they are not happy, rather they're always stressed and anxious. This is why being wise is really important and in this podcast segment, we will discuss 5 signs of a wise person so that you can discern whether you have to many any changes in your way of living or not.
8 Life Lessons From Buddhism
Psychology In Hindi Saurabh Gandhi
access_time1 month ago
Siddhartha Gautama a.k.a The Buddha was the founder of the world religion of Buddhism. He was born into a really rich family and had every facility that money could provide at that time. But he was still not happy. This made him curious about the problem of suffering and this curiosity became even stronger when he left his palace and witnessed what real suffering really is. Since that day, everything he did was to decrease the suffering of people. He got enlightened and passed his teachings on to his disciples that gave birth to Buddhism. In this podcast segment, we will discuss 8 life lessons that Buddha gave on success, wealth, peace, joy, habits, anger, karma, and acquiring wisdom.
Psychology In Hindi Saurabh Gandhi
access_time1 month ago
Beauty matters and we cannot deny this fact. Whenever we see a beautiful face, our brain releases dopamine which makes us happier and we want to keep looking at that face. But what about those people who aren't blessed with good genetics? Don't they deserve to be noticed and appreciated as well? Is outer beauty everything? What to do when you don't feeling beautiful enough and all you feel is ugly? In this podcast segment, we will answer all these questions and discuss how we can manage these negative feelings related to our appearance.
Is Being Single Better?
Psychology In Hindi Saurabh Gandhi
access_time1 month ago
The divorce rates in the west are at all time high and just because we are copying their culture, in India we're seeing a similar problem arising. People are running away from relationships and marriage. They are delaying it as much as they can, but why? Is being single better? What is driving young people to be alone? In this podcast segment, we will explore these questions and answer why people are being urged into being alone.
How To Be Charming
Psychology In Hindi Saurabh Gandhi
access_time1 month ago
All of us have met that person who has just something about them that changes the energy of the entire room. They get all the attention, people laugh when they laugh, people listen carefully when they speak and everyone just falls in love with them without knowing the reason why. So, in this podcast segment, we will answer the quesion: how to be charming and impress anyone you want.
Tooth and Claw: Lions
Discovery BBC
access_time1 month ago
From Aslan to Simba, from the Wizard of Oz to heraldry, children in the West probably recognise this king of beasts before they can name the animals in their own back yards. But what about people who have lions roaming in their back yards literally? To find out more about the archetypal ‘man-eater; and how our increasingly complex relationship with them is playing out in Africa, Professor Adam Hart talks to two female researchers who have spent much of their lives working and living in lion country, helping to manage the wildlife conflicts that are becoming a threat to both humans and beasts. Dr Moreangels Mbizah is the Founding Director of Wildlife Conservation Action in Zimbabwe, and Dr Amy Dickman heads up the Ruaha Carnivore Project in Tanzania. Produced by Rami Tzabar and Beth Eastwood Presented by Professor Adam Hart. Picture: Lion, Credit: Nicholas Hodges/Getty Images
6 Signs You Can’t Trust Someone
Psychology In Hindi Saurabh Gandhi
access_time1 month ago
Every healthy relationship is built over the foundation of trust. Without trusting someone, you can never build a deep bond, because you know that one day they will betray you. But how do you know whether a person is trustworthy or not? In this podcast segment we will talk about 6 major signs that will make clear, how a person behaves when he/she is someone who shouldn't be trusted.
Your Habits = Your Future
Psychology In Hindi Saurabh Gandhi
access_time1 month ago
This is a universal law that every effect has a cause. Just like your present in built upon your past, you future is built upon your present. That's why every habit that you perform now, will determine the type of person you'll become years down the road. That's why having good habits are important and in this podcast segment, we will dive deeper into the realm of habits & understand what is the best way to develop new good habits & stop the bad ones.
10 Lessons From Stoicism
Psychology In Hindi Saurabh Gandhi
access_time1 month ago
Stoicism is a philosophy that helps people live their best lives through gratitude, positive mindset, virtues, discipline and the development of a strong character. One who is Stoic, can endure anything and handle everything life throws at him. Instead of fearing pain, you welcome pain and instead of disregarding nature for its chaotic aspect, you live in accordance with nature. This is a mindset that has kept millions of people focused on their goal while they achieve success or get what they always wanted. So, in this podcast segment, we will discuss 10 of the most important lessons from the stoic school of thought.
5 Psychological Tricks to Win any Argument
Psychology In Hindi Saurabh Gandhi
access_time1 month ago
Every now and then we get into an argument, because in order to get to the truth, disagreements and a clash of different view points are necessary. If nobody ever disagrees or argues with you, that means your discussions are shallow and not meaningful. Whenever something of value is discussed with a variety of people, disagreements are obvious. So, in such a situation, how do you win an argument? In this podcast segment, we will try to answer this question using 5 psychological tricks.
Why Smart People Have LESS Friends - क्यूँ Intelligent लोग अकेले रहते हैं
Psychology In Hindi Saurabh Gandhi
access_time1 month ago
Whether it be Nikola Tesla, Isaac Newton or Albert Einstein, it is well known that highly intelligent people have fewer friends. In a recent study, it was found that smart people are happier and more satisfied when they're alone rather than being around friends. But why? In this podcast segment, we will try to answer this questions with various reasons why smart people have less friends.
The Positive Side Of Anger - How to Use Anger To Fuel Yourself
Psychology In Hindi Saurabh Gandhi
access_time1 month ago
Anger is a really powerful emotion that has taken and saved many lives. Every individual uses their anger in a different way. Some torture themselves and their peers. Others control their anger and don't let it affect their work. But there are also some people who use their anger in a creative and productive way to achieve more success and more personal growth. That's why in this podcast segment, we will talk about how you can harness the positive side of anger, so that instead of harming yourself, you use your emotions to improve the quality of your life.
7 Reasons Why People FAIL
Psychology In Hindi Saurabh Gandhi
access_time1 month ago
Many of our listeners and viewers are fighting different battles in their lives, and in any area of life, whether it be career, relationships or one's own mental peace, it is so easy to end up failing and stay in that state. So, in this podcast segment, we will give 7 reasons why people fail and how you can use this information to turn your failures into success.
Doubling Earth’s Energy Imbalance
Science in Action BBC
access_time1 month ago
On Science in Action this week Nasa scientists have observed that the Earth’s Energy Imbalance has doubled in just 15 years. As greenhouse gas atmospheric concentrations have risen, so too has the difference between the total amount of energy being absorbed from the sun, and the total amount being re-radiated back into space. Meanwhile, as we all heat up, scientists at the LIGO Gravitational Wave Observatory have managed to do something very cool with their mirrors. Such is the precision with which the detectors have been engineered, they have managed to effectively reduce the temperature of one of the big 10kg reflectors to such an extent that it betrays its quantum state as if it were simply one big subatomic particle. So what? Roland Pease finds out. Presented by Roland Pease Produced by Alex Mansfield (Image: Getty Images) Presenter: Roland Pease Producer: Alex Mansfield
5 WARNING Signs You Are Becoming Toxic
Psychology In Hindi Saurabh Gandhi
access_time1 month ago
Whenever we interact with someone, it is easier for us to understand if they're toxic and hanging out with them might be bad for us. There are signs in one's personality, body language, way of communication and even the way they treat others. But what about you yourself? What if you are the one who is being toxic? It is so easy to ignore our own biases and lies that we cannot naturally identify when we are transforming into a bad person and hurting others in the process. That's why in this podcast segment, we will talk about 5 signs that will help you understand, whether you have toxic tendencies or not, and when you have to take action to unlearn such behaviors.
Tooth and Claw: Crocodiles
Discovery BBC
access_time1 month ago
We have a morbid fascination with predators. And we've had it since the very first people carved figures or painted on cave walls thousands of years ago. Predators are still revered as gods in many cultures. Our cultural fascination is equalled only by our biological fear, hardwired into our primate brains, because if you are not a predator, you ARE the prey. In this series, Professor Adam Hart and explores our complex, challenging and ambiguous relationship with Earth’s greatest predators by talking to the women and men who know them best, researchers who have spent their lives tracking them, protecting them and, sometimes, narrowly escaping them. Today it’s the crocodile, part of the group known as crocodilians which also includes alligators and gharials, which first appeared 95 million years ago during the Late Cretaceous period. Much like Tigers, they don’t stalk their prey but lie in wait – often just below the surface of the water, ready to leap out and snap those ferocious jaws on just about anything – including other predators. But as we’ll discover, there is a very different side to these much maligned creatures, who can be nurturing and cooperative. Adam speaks to Dr Marisa Tellez, Co-Founder of the Crocodile Research Coalition in Belize, Central America and Dr Alan Britton is a Zoologist and crocodile specialist in Darwin, Australia, who has a 5-metre croc named Smaug living in his back garden pond. Produced by Rami Tzabar and Beth Eastwood Picture: Caiman Crocodile's eye, close up, Credit: Jonathan Knowles/Getty Images