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Science & Medicine - Raaga.com - A World of Music

Science & Medicine

Stars Colliding
The Science Hour BBC
access_time19 hours ago
Astrophysicists Samaya Nissanke of Radboud University and Sheila Rowan of the University of Glasgow discuss the astronomical discovery of the year, if not the last couple of decades: the collision of two neutron stars and the cosmic gold-forging aftermath. The discovery of this long-hypothesized event on 17th August came from the much awaited marriage of the capabilities of the gravitational wave detectors LIGO and Virgo with those of ground-based and space-based telescopes. Virgin has recently invested in a futuristic technology, Virgin Hyperloop One, which aims to create a speedy pod-based transport system. Alison van Diggelen talks to Richard Branson about his ambitious plans, including supersonic and space travel. It's Diwali this week - and the Hindu festival is celebrated with prayers, food and fireworks. But in India, firecrackers have become so popular that there's a spike in air pollution - serious for anyone with lung problems like asthma. The sale of firecrackers has been banned in Delhi - in the hope of preventing a toxic smog from blanketing the city, as reporter Chavvi Suchdev explains. The dense rain forests of Java - Indonesia's most crowded island - are rapidly falling silent. Tuneful songbirds that used to give the mountains a unique melody are being caught and sold. Bird-singing competitions are national events in the country, but this is threatening to drive the songbirds to extinction. BBC science reporter Victoria Gill has travelled to the country to investigate. The discovery of the brain's "waste disposal" system could transform our understanding of neurological conditions. Until now, there was no evidence of the lymphatic system in the human brain. Claudia Hammond spoke to Senior Investigator Danny Reich from the National Institutes of Health in the US, about how this knowledge may eventually add to our understanding of brain conditions like multiple sclerosis. A large brain, relative to our size, underpins sophisticated social structure in humans. Whales and dolphins also have exceptionally large and anatomically sophisticated brains. But until recently it has been unclear whether large brain size is linked to social structure in these marine mammals. Author of a new study Michael Muthukrishna tells Roland Pease more about tackling the question of brain size and intelligence in human evolution. In,'The Chinese Typewriter: A History',Tom Mullaney recalls the great engineering and linguistic challenges in the 19th and 20th centuries of getting the Chinese language onto a table top machine. One consequence was the development of predictive text in the Chinese IT world long before it appeared in the West. Gareth Mitchell talks to Tom Mullaney. The Science Hour was presented by Gareth Mitchell with comments from Victoria Gill BBC Science Reporter. Producer: Katy Takatsuki (Picture: Artist's concept of the explosive collision of two neutron stars. Credit: Illustration by Robin Dienel courtesy of the Carnegie Institution for Science)
Cosmic Queries - Climate Change
StarTalk Radio StarTalk Radio
access_time1 day ago
Bill Nye is back to lead the fight against climate change and answer questions about the future of climate science. He’s joined by Columbia University climate scientist Dr. Radley Horton, and comic co-host Chuck Nice. NOTE: StarTalk All-Access subscribers can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free: https://www.startalkradio.net/all-access/cosmic-queries-climate-change/
#ICYMI - Surf's Up - The Big Waves
StarTalk Radio StarTalk Radio
access_time2 days ago
Aloha, Dudes! It’s time to shoot the curl when Gary and Chuck dive into the serious science of surfing the big waves. Their guides: California surfer – and NASA oceanographer – Bill Patzert, and, from Maui, pro surfer and the first female Big Wave World Champion, Paige Alms. Don’t miss an episode of Playing with Science. Subscribe to our channels on: TuneIn: tunein.com/playingwithscience Apple Podcasts: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/playing-with-science/id1198280360 GooglePlay Music: https://play.google.com/music/listen?u=0#/ps/Iimke5bwpoh2nb25swchmw6kzjq SoundCloud: https://soundcloud.com/startalk_playing-with-science Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/startalk/playing-with-science NOTE: StarTalk All-Access subscribers can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free: https://www.startalkradio.net/all-access/surfs-up-the-big-waves/
Detecting a ‘Bling Nova’
Science in Action BBC
access_time2 days ago
In the short window of time between the VIRGO gravitational wave detector being switched on, in Piza in Italy, and the LIGO detector, in the US, being switched off for an upgrade, the teams detected the signal they had hoped for, but dared not expect. A space-altering gravity ripple, followed by a gamma ray burst signal and when the World’s telescopes turned to the Hydra constellation they also saw an optical flash. These signals were from two neutron stars, having danced a death spiral and crashed into one another 130 million years ago. It’s been nicknamed a ‘Bling Nova’, because this massively energetic reaction, is where lots of the gold, platinum and heavy metals in the Universe come from. Whale and Dolphin Brain-size A large brain, relative to our size, underpins sophisticated social structure in humans. Things like language, shared goals, teaching, consensus decision-making and empathy require great intelligence. Whales and dolphins also have exceptionally large and anatomically sophisticated brains. But until recently it has been unclear whether large brain size is linked to social structure in these marine mammals. A recent study suggests that large brains might similarly have arisen to provide the capacity to learn in response to the challenges of social living. Picture: Artist’s concept of the explosive collision of two neutron stars. Credit: Illustration by Robin Dienel courtesy of the Carnegie Institution for Science Presenter: Roland Pease Producer: Fiona Roberts
Dr Google; Sexual orientation and the NHS; Hypermobility; Surgery for COPD
Inside Health BBC
access_time4 days ago
GPs have been told to ask about their patients' sexual orientation as NHS England plans to record this data for everyone using the service over the age of 16. Dr Google - are doctors' noses really being put out of joint by patients searching their symptoms on the internet to come up with their own diagnoses? Hypermobility is being double jointed and flexible and is often perceived as an asset, but for around 1 in 30 of the population it can be a problem that is often missed - and mismanaged. Plus a counterintuitive approach to help people with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. You might think the last thing someone with breathing difficulties needs is smaller lungs, but lung reduction surgery is exactly what's being offered some people with COPD.
SOS Snail
Discovery BBC
access_time5 days ago
This is a big story about a little snail. Biologist Helen Scales relates an epic tale that spans the globe and involves calamity, tragedy, extinction and we hope, salvation. It stars the tiny tree-dwelling mollusc from French Polynesia, Partula, a snail that has captivated scientists for centuries. Like Charles Darwin studied finches on the Galapagos, Partula became an icon of evolution because, in the living laboratories of the Pacific islands, it had evolved into multiple species. But a calamity drove Partula to extinction, when a botched biological control, the predatory Rosy Wolf Snail, was introduced. It was supposed to eat another problem mollusc, but in a cruel twist, devoured tiny Partula instead. An international rescue mission was scrambled to save a species and from just one or two rescued individuals, populations of this snail species have been built up over thirty years in captive breeding programmes in zoos around the world. And now, in the nailbiting sequel, we track Partula’s journey home. Picture: Reintroduced Partula dispersing on Moorea in French Polynesia, Credit: ZSL Presenter: Helen Scales Producer: Fiona Hill
Childhood Obesity
The Science Hour BBC
access_time8 days ago
Childhood and teenage obesity is spreading across the world at an alarming rate – and this week the first evidence of the extent of the crisis has been published. Experts at the World Health Organization (WHO) and Imperial College, London analysed data from more than 2000 studies, involving 128 million children and adolescents worldwide. Claudia Hammond speaks to Dr Juana Willumsen from the WHO. By measuring how carbon moves through Earth's ecosystems we can get a grip on how human activities are altering the carbon cycle. NASA’s Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) has been watching the Earth breathe from space since 2014 and the results show the impact of El Nino events, volcanic activity and forest fires and even the pollution from individual highways, as Deputy Project Scientist AnnMarie Eldering explains. Incidental recordings of bird and insect calls before, during and after, the 2015 wildfires in Southeast Asia, reveals a clever way of assessing the damage caused by the haze from these fires to the biodiversity in Singapore. Caroline Steel reports. The massive eruption in 1883 of the volcano Krakatau (Krakatoa) in Indonesia unleashed huge tsunamis. The explosion is thought to be the loudest sound ever heard in modern history, with reports of it being heard up to 3,000 miles (4,800 km) from its point of origin. So it may be surprising to hear that there are very few remnants of the pumice rock, spewed out in huge numbers at the time. One rare sample survived and is being analysed, along with samples of dust from the deck of the boat that was nearest the volcano at the time, in order to calculate just how explosive the eruption was. A team at the Georgia Institute of Technology has built a record-breaking mechanical pump. The machine pumped molten tin at 1200 degrees Celsius continuously for 72 hours, and it has worked at even higher white hot temperatures. The pump is fabricated entirely from a heat-resistant ceramic material. Georgia Tech's Asegun Henry is developing the technology to transform the contribution that solar and wind energy generation can make in storing energy and supplying the electricity grid. A new species of ichthyosaur - predatory marine reptiles that swam the world's oceans whilst dinosaurs walked the land - has been discovered. BBC Science reporter Bobbie Lakhera explains, and we hear from palaeontologist Dean Lomax who made the discovery. If you saw someone with a sign on the street saying “free listening here”, would you pull up and chair, sit down and tell them all of your problems? In Oakland, California, passers-by are doing just that – thanks to the “active listening” of Sidewalk Talks volunteers. Those involved say it’s life-changing, as Alison van Diggelen reports. The Science Hour was presented by Roland Pease with comments from BBC Science reporter Bobbie Lakhera. Producer: Katy Takatsuki (Picture: Child at swimming pool. Credit: Getty Images)
StarTalk Live! from Future Con: Engineering the Future (Part 2)
StarTalk Radio StarTalk Radio
access_time8 days ago
Join us as we continue our journey into the future with former astronaut and ISS Commander Chris Hadfield, co-host Scott Adsit, biorobotics engineer Katherine Pratt, mechanical engineer Suveen Mathaudu, Maeve Higgins, and, via holographic projection, Stephen Hawking. NOTE: StarTalk All-Access subscribers can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free: https://www.startalkradio.net/all-access/startalk-live-from-future-con-engineering-the-future-part-2/
Golf Science, with Geoff Ogilvy and Neil deGrasse Tyson
StarTalk Radio StarTalk Radio
access_time9 days ago
Aerodynamics, Doppler radar, laser tracking, and big data! Gary and Chuck find out how science has guided the evolution of golf, from why balls have dimples to how clubs are designed, with astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson and, from the PGA Tour, 3x world golf champion Geoff Ogilvy. Don’t miss an episode of Playing with Science. Subscribe to our channels on: TuneIn: tunein.com/playingwithscience Apple Podcasts: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/playing-with-science/id1198280360 GooglePlay Music: https://play.google.com/music/listen?u=0#/ps/Iimke5bwpoh2nb25swchmw6kzjq SoundCloud: https://soundcloud.com/startalk_playing-with-science Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/startalk/playing-with-science NOTE: StarTalk All-Access subscribers can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free: https://www.startalkradio.net/all-access/golf-science-with-geoff-ogilvy-and-neil-degrasse-tyson/
Watching the Earth ‘Breathe’
Science in Action BBC
access_time9 days ago
By measuring how carbon moves through Earth's ecosystems we can get a grip on how human activities are altering the carbon cycle. NASA’s Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) has been watching the Earth breathe from space since 2014 and the results show the impact of El Nino events, volcanic activity and forest fires and even the pollution from individual highways. Acoustic Biodiversity Incidental recordings of bird and insect calls before, during and after, the 2015 wildfires in Southeast Asia, reveals a clever way of assessing the damage caused by the haze from these fires to the biodiversity in Singapore. Measuring the Power of Krakatau The massive eruption in 1883 of the volcano Krakatau (Krakatoa) in Indonesia unleashed huge tsunamis (killing more than 36,000 people). The explosion is thought to be the loudest sound ever heard in modern history, with reports of it being heard up to 3,000 miles (4,800 km) from its point of origin. So it may be surprising to hear that there are very few remnants of the pumice rock, spewed out in huge numbers at the time. One rare sample survived and is being analysed, along with samples of dust from the deck of the boat that was nearest the volcano at the time, in order to calculate just how explosive the eruption was. Sinking of the Anthenia Just seven hours after Lord Chamberlain announced that Britain had joined the war against Germany in September 1939, the cruise ship The Athenia was sunk by a German U Boat off the coast of Ireland. Now, clever forensic examination of sea bed sonar scans, log books and weather charts has revealed the possible resting place of one of the first maritime casualties of World War Two. Picture credit: NASA-JPL/Caltech Presenter: Roland Pease Producer: Fiona Roberts
Vaginal mesh; alcohol and the heart
Inside Health BBC
access_time11 days ago
Vaginal mesh, used for the treatment of prolapse and incontinence, has hit the news recently as women pursue litigation after suffering serious complications. But there have been concerns ever since the first type of vaginal mesh was launched in the mid-nineties, only to be withdrawn a few years later. Carl Heneghan, Professor of Evidence Based Medicine at the University of Oxford, explains the 'shambolic' regulation of medical devices, Consultant gynaecologist Swati Jha, who has been collecting data on mesh for over a decade, believes media coverage has been muddled. Women speak of living with surgery, while Inside Health's Dr Margaret McCartney calls for a registry to collect effective data. Plus, new guidance in Scotland challenges the so called 'J-shaped curve' - evidence that moderate drinking is good for the heart. Naveed Sattar, Professor of Metabolic Medicine at the University of Glasgow and part of the committee that produced the updated guidance, talks to Mark Porter about the changes.
Indian Science – The Colonial Legacy
Discovery BBC
access_time12 days ago
This month London’s Science Museum launched a new exhibition on Indian science. For more than 200 years Britain ruled India, bringing many aspects of British culture to India - including European science developed during the enlightenment. However centuries earlier India had already pioneered work in astronomy, mathematics and engineering. How was India’s scientific progress affected by colonialism? Did British rule hold the country back, or did it drive it forward? Presented by Angela Saini. Picture: The Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) communication satellite GSAT-19, carried onboard the Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle (GSLV-mark III ), launches at Sriharikota on June 5, 2017, Credit: ARUN SANKAR/AFP/Getty Images
Body Clock Geneticists Win Nobel Prize
The Science Hour BBC
access_time15 days ago
The Nobel Prize for Medicine has been awarded to three American scientists who discovered the existence of circadian rhythms – the body clock in all living cells. Their research involved fruit flies – but the findings are relevant to humans. The BBC’s Tom Feilden spoke to one of the winners, Michael Rosbash, and Claudia Hammond gets some expert tips for a good night’s sleep from sleep scientist Professor Matthew Walker. Gareth Mitchell talks to Professor Gillian Foulger of Durham University about HiQuake, the world's largest database of human-induced earthquakes. Professor Foulger and her team have so far compiled close to 750 seismic events. Among the surprises is the fact that the US state of Oklahoma is more seismically active than California because of quakes and tremors set off by the local oil and gas industry. An AI retreat at the location in Norway used for the film Ex-Machina has been the focus of expert discussion on the future of AI. Bill Thompson joined the retreat arranged by Clearleft’s Andy Budd. The 2017 Nobel prize in physics has been awarded to three US scientists for the detection of gravitational waves. The ripples were predicted by Albert Einstein and are a fundamental consequence of his General Theory of Relativity. The winners, Rainer Weiss, Kip Thorne and Barry Barish, are members of the Ligo/Virgo observatories, which were responsible for the breakthrough. Professor Weiss talks to Ritula Shah. The theory of plate tectonics is 50 years old. It's as fundamental to understanding the Earth as evolution by natural selection is to understanding life. Roland Pease meets geologists Dan McKenzie, John Dewey and Xavier Le Pichon who played key roles in proving the hypothesis in the late 1960s. Ideas on improving cancer care in low and middle-income countries have been shared at a conference at the Royal Society of Medicine in London this week. Claudia Hammond speaks to Dr Harrison Chuwa, from Aga Khan Hospital in Dar es Salaam, and Shailesh Shrikhande, from the Tata Memorial Hospital in Mumbai, about some of the solutions. The United States has removed some of its diplomats from its embassy in Havana, Cuba, after they complained of ailments like hearing loss, dizziness, headaches and nausea. It’s led to speculation that some kind of sonic or acoustic weapon might be responsible. Trevor Cox, professor of acoustic engineering at the University of Salford, discusses the likelihood with Gareth Mitchell. (Picture caption: Man and his dog comfortably sleeping in © Getty Images) The Science Hour was presented by Claudia Hammond with comments from science journalist and editor at the Economist Jason Palmer Producer: Katy Takatsuki
StarTalk Live! from Future Con: Engineering the Future (Part 1)
StarTalk Radio StarTalk Radio
access_time16 days ago
How will we engineer our way off this planet and into the future? Commander Chris Hadfield and co-host Scott Adsit explore the options with biorobotics engineer Katherine Pratt, mechanical engineer Suveen Mathaudu, Maeve Higgins, and, via holographic projection, Stephen Hawking. NOTE: StarTalk All-Access subscribers can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free: https://www.startalkradio.net/all-access/startalk-live-from-future-con-engineering-the-future-part-1/
2017 Nobel Prizes for Science
Science in Action BBC
access_time16 days ago
Three relatively easy to understand, and very well-deserved, Nobel Science Prize winning categories this year. The Nobel Prize in Physics 2017 was awarded to Rainer Weiss, Barry C. Barish and Kip S. Thorne "for decisive contributions to the LIGO detector and the observation of gravitational waves". The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2017 was awarded to Jacques Dubochet, Joachim Frank and Richard Henderson "for developing cryo-electron microscopy for the high-resolution structure determination of biomolecules in solution". The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2017 was awarded to Jeffrey C. Hall, Michael Rosbash and Michael W. Young "for their discoveries of molecular mechanisms controlling the circadian rhythm". 50th Anniversary of the Theory of Plate Tectonics Scientists are celebrating 50 years of the theory of plate tectonics. This is geology’s equivalent of the ‘Theory of Evolution’ or the ‘Standard Model’ for physics. A fundamental, unifying principle that explains mountains, volcanoes, earthquakes and much, much more. Even down to why marsupials arrived in Australia. Roland gathers the key players to get the story. Sonic weapons in Cuba? US and Canadian diplomats in Cuba have been complaining of a whole host of symptoms, from hearing loss to feeling nauseated, over the past 10 months. This has led to speculation that some kind of new ‘sonic weapon’ is being used, where sound waves are being directed at these officials in order to do them harm. Professor of acoustics, at University of Salford, Trevor Cox explains how sound could be used as a weapon, but thinks these attacks are more likely to be explained by chemistry, psychology or politics. Photo caption: Black Holes Colliding producing Gravitational Waves © Advanced LIGO Presenter: Roland Pease Producer: Fiona Roberts
#ICMY - Gymnastics: Leap, Bounce & Balance
StarTalk Radio StarTalk Radio
access_time17 days ago
Chuck Nice and Garry O’Reilly vault into the world of competitive gymnastics with the help of two former Olympic gymnasts: Dr. Phil Cheetham, Senior Sport Technologist for the US Olympic Committee, and 2008 Silver Medalist Samantha Peszek. Don’t miss an episode of Playing with Science. Subscribe to our channels on: TuneIn: tunein.com/playingwithscience Apple Podcasts: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/playing-with-science/id1198280360 GooglePlay Music: https://play.google.com/music/listen?u=0#/ps/Iimke5bwpoh2nb25swchmw6kzjq SoundCloud: https://soundcloud.com/startalk_playing-with-science Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/startalk/playing-with-science NOTE: StarTalk All-Access subscribers can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free: https://www.startalkradio.net/all-access/gymnastics-leap-bounce-and-balance/
Big Baby Birth Trial, Uveitis, Telephone Triage, Burns
Inside Health BBC
access_time18 days ago
Mention arthritis and most people think of older people with osteoarthritic hips or knees. But children get arthritis too, although it's an inflammatory condition where the child's immune system attacks the lining of the joints causing pain, swelling and stiffness. But the joints aren't the only part of the body affected. Around one in six of the 12,000 children in the UK with juvenile idiopathic arthritis also develop worrying inflammation in their eyes, uveitis. This is a silent, symptomless condition which can result in significant visual impairment and even blindness. But a new drug treatment, tested in the UK, has proved to be so successful for this group of children that it has revolutionised treatment both in this country and around the world. The benefits were so large that the trial was stopped early and the new therapy adopted as frontline treatment. Dr Mark Porter visits the Bristol Eye Hospital and meets paediatric rheumatology consultant, Professor Athimalaipet Ramanan to find out more. Bigger babies can get stuck in the final stages of labour - a condition called shoulder dystocia. Most are delivered safely but there are both enormous risks to the baby through lack of oxygen and a traumatic experience for the mother. Professor of Obstetrics at Warwick Medical School, Siobhan Quenby, tells Mark that a nationwide trial of big baby births aims to find out whether delivering the child two weeks early, at 38 weeks, reduces shoulder dystocia and makes the birth safer for mother and child. A report by NHS England highlights cost savings of around £100,000 for GP practices that use telephone triage for patients. But the first independent evaluation of this system, where everyone speaks to a doctor on the phone before they get a face to face appointment suggests that policy makers should reconsider their unequivocal support. Inside Health contributor Dr Margaret McCartney, herself a GP, reviews the findings. Several thousand people a year, many of them children, are admitted to hospital every year with serious burns. One of the country's leading centres for burns victims is at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham. As well as serving 13 million people in the local area, the Healing Foundation UK Burns Research Centre treats injured service personnel, airlifted from conflict zones in Iraq and Afghanistan. Mark gets a tour of the unit from director Naiem Moieman and finds out about the newest research on burns treatment which uses some of the oldest remedies.
India's Ancient Science
Discovery BBC
access_time19 days ago
We go behind the scenes of a new exhibition on India at London’s Science Museum. What can historical objects tell us about India’s rich, and often hidden scientific past? We look at the influential mathematics, metallurgy and civil engineering of ancient India. The exhibition also contain artefacts from India’s time under the British Empire. We ask how the many years of colonial rule shaped the more recent scientific development of India. Science journalist Angela Saini presents. Image: Bakhshali manuscript, Credit: Bodleian Library
Antibiotic Resistance
The Science Hour BBC
access_time22 days ago
The World Health organisation has warned there are too few new antibiotics in the development pipelines to replace those becoming obsolete. Gareth Mitchell talks to Willem van Schaik, a professor of microbiology at the University of Birmingham, and UBS analyst Jack Scannell, about the threat of antibiotic resistance. ‘Chemical surgery’ has been performed on human embryos to remove disease for the first time, Chinese researchers have told the BBC. Leading scientists give their first reaction on this ‘base editing’. Also, studio guest Dr Claire Ainsworth, expert in developmental genetics, explains what it could mean. A menstrual cup is an alternative to sanitary towels or tampons that is transforming the lives of some teenage girls in Kenya. Many cannot afford sanitary protection. Others had ‘boyfriends’ who would buy them pads – in return for sex. Maeve Frances reports from outside Kisumu in the west of the country. The gravitational waves produced by two massive black holes colliding two billion years ago have been detected by three gravitational wave detectors for the first time. Professor Sheila Rowan of the University of Glasgow explains the importance of this new three way observation. Marine ecologist Tracey Rogers talks to Jim Al-Khalili about her research on one of Antarctica's top predators, the leopard seal. Tracey's research has encompassed the animal's prolific and eerie underwater singing to radical changes in its diet that appear to be linked to climate change. Scientists in Zurich have been carrying out new research with drones and lightweight cameras that will enable UAVs to conduct reconnaissance in poor light. Professor Davide Scaramuzza discusses the latest research with Gareth Mitchell. Most of us are not getting enough sleep and it is affecting our health and life expectancy according to Professor Matthew Walker, whose book, Why We Sleep, is published this week. He has a family history of cardiovascular disease – and does everything he can to protect his sleep. He talks to Claudia Hammond. (Image caption: Biofilm of antibiotic resistant bacteria © Getty Images) The Science Hour was presented by Gareth Mitchell with comments from freelance science journalist, Dr Claire Ainsworth Producer: Katy Takatsuki
Cosmic Queries - Office Hours
StarTalk Radio StarTalk Radio
access_time22 days ago
The astrophysicist is in! Join Neil deGrasse Tyson and comic co-host Chuck Nice as they answer fan-submitted Cosmic Queries on the possibility of life in the universe, space dust, relativity, inter-galactic space war, reliable news sources and more! NOTE: StarTalk All-Access subscribers can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free: https://www.startalkradio.net/all-access/cosmic-queries-office-hours/
Understanding the Natural World
Science in Action BBC
access_time23 days ago
BBC World Service’s Science in Action kicks off the first day of New Scientist Live 2017. In this special panel discussion in front of a live audience, Roland Pease is joined by leading ecologists and experts in different environments: Rob Ewers focuses on forests and their biodiversity, Jane Hill on the impacts of climate change, and Alan Jamieson on extreme marine environments. From dense Amazonian forests to the abyss under the sea surface, why is it important to understand the living planet? There’s no denying the impact that our human activity is having on the environment. So much so, we’re entering a geological epoch named specially for us – the Anthropocene. Recent surveys even revealed that we know more of unicorns and mermaids than of world’s most unique and irreplaceable real-life species. But what does it mean for us to understand nature, and what’s the impact of our understanding on the plants and animals we share Earth with? How can we decide which endangered species we can and should conserve? Picture: Roland Pease, Dr Alan Jamieson, Professor Jane Hill, Professor Rob Ewers, Credit: Silvia Lazzaris Presenter: Roland Pease Producers: Fiona Roberts and Samanta Oon
#ICYMI - Baseball: Brain Training
StarTalk Radio StarTalk Radio
access_time23 days ago
What happens inside the brain of a great baseball hitter, and can it be taught? Gary O’Reilly and Chuck Nice explore the subject with baseball vision trainer Dr. Bill Harrison, neuroscientist Prof. Aaron Seitz, and baseball analyst and former LA Dodgers GM Ned Colleti. Don’t miss an episode of Playing with Science. Subscribe to our channels on: TuneIn: tunein.com/playingwithscience Apple Podcasts: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/playing-with-science/id1198280360 GooglePlay Music: https://play.google.com/music/listen?u=0#/ps/Iimke5bwpoh2nb25swchmw6kzjq SoundCloud: https://soundcloud.com/startalk_playing-with-science Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/startalk/playing-with-science NOTE: StarTalk All-Access subscribers can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free: https://www.startalkradio.net/all-access/baseball-brain-training/
Scoliosis, Depression, Pets in Hospital, Eustachian Tubes
Inside Health BBC
access_time25 days ago
After Simon Cowell paid for a Britain's Got talent contestant to have surgery in the US for her curved spine we examine the state of therapy for scoliosis here in the UK. Recent headlines claimed that 1 in 4 teenage girls are depressed but were they accurate? And pets in hospital: the Royal College of Nursing has called for patients to have better access to animals, including their own. Plus Eustachian tubes: tips for what to do if you have blocked ears after your summer holiday.
Africa’s Great Green Wall
Discovery BBC
access_time26 days ago
Can Africa’s Great Green Wall beat back the Sahara desert and reverse the degrading landscape? The ambitious 9 miles wide and 5000 miles long line of vegetation will stretch all the way from Dakar in the west to Djibouti in the east. Thomas Fessy is in Senegal where the wall has already begun to evolve into a series of forests and garden communities. He meets the planners, planters, ecologists and local villagers to hear how its early progress is reversing years of poor land use, turning nomads back to farmers, empowering women and creating healthy ecosystems for rain fed agriculture. But can it meet its ambition to stabilize an unstable region, reverse the growing trend of migration, fight the effects of climate change and ensure this big African dream doesn’t die in the sand? Picture: The Great Green Wall, credit: BBC Producer Adrian Washbourne
Mexican Earthquakes
The Science Hour BBC
access_time29 days ago
Mexico suffered its second earthquake in less than 14 days. Why has there been two events in such a short space of time? Scientists have found a gene that could be critical in deciding if a newly fertilised egg gets established. This could have implications for IVF treatment. People seeking tattoos might know to check for clean needles, but what about the ink? The German government has set up a group to study how the inks could impact on our health. It’s been suggested that the acoustics of a cave correlates with the location paintings on the walls. Scientists are testing this theory by listening. Children in Italy must have all of their vaccinations before they can start school. The steps were taken after an estimated 4,000 cases of measles last year and three deaths. Congratulations to Cordelia Fine, who won the Royal Society Book Prize. Claudia Hammond was of the judges and discusses why Testosterone Rex won. Is it fair to kill invasive species which humans have introduced? We travel to New Zealand to see if poisoning rats could save the kiwi bird. Two years ago, a new species of hominin was discovered. We hear from one of the archaeologists who took extraordinary measures to excavate the bones. (Photo caption: Rescuers, firefighters, policemen, soldiers and volunteers search for survivors in a flattened building in Mexico City © Yuri Cortez/AFP/Getty Images) The Science Hour was presented by Claudia Hammond with comments from BBC Science Correspondent Helen Briggs Producer Graihagh Jackson and Katy Takatsuki
Let’s Make America Smart Again: The Future of NASA
StarTalk Radio StarTalk Radio
access_time29 days ago
Continuing with our Let’s Make America Smart again series, we answer fan-submitted Cosmic Queries on the past, present, and future missions of NASA with Neil deGrasse Tyson, comic co-host Chuck Nice, and former NASA chief scientist Ellen Stofan. NOTE: StarTalk All-Access subscribers can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free here: https://www.startalkradio.net/all-access/lets-make-america-smart-again-the-future-of-nasa/
#ICMYI: Martial Arts – Fight Like a Physicist
StarTalk Radio StarTalk Radio
access_time1 month ago
Chuck Nice and Gary O’Reilly get schooled on the martial arts by two fighting physicists: Jason Thalken, who has a Black Belt in Hopkido, and Prof. John Eric Goff, who has a Black Belt in Karate. Don’t miss an episode of Playing with Science. Subscribe to our channels on: Apple Podcasts: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/playing-with-science/id1198280360?mt=2 GooglePlay Music: https://play.google.com/music/listen?u=0#/ps/Iimke5bwpoh2nb25swchmw6kzjq SoundCloud: https://soundcloud.com/startalk_playing-with-science Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/startalk/playing-with-science TuneIn: http://www.tunein.com/playingwithscience NOTE: StarTalk All-Access subscribers can watch/listen to this entire episode commercial-free: https://www.startalkradio.net/all-access/martial-arts-fight-like-a-physicist/
Mexican Earthquake
Science in Action BBC
access_time1 month ago
This week Mexico suffered its second major Earthquake in less than 14 days. The latest earthquake registered 7.1 magnitude and has caused widespread damage in the capital Mexico City, resulting in hundreds of causalities as buildings collapsed around the city. We speak to seismologist Dr Stephen Hicks from the University of Southampton about the geological reasons Mexico is susceptible to earthquakes; why have we seen two large earthquakes in such a short period of time; why the most recent earthquake was more destructive than the last, and did the first earthquake trigger the second. In the first few days after conception, the fertilised egg subdivides first into two cells, then four and so on. It eventually becomes a hollowed out ball made up of about 200 cells called a blastocyst. The gene for a protein called OCT4 appears to be critical in deciding how that embryonic foundation gets established. Did our ancestors have performance spaces in caves? Bruno Fazenda gives us an introduction to the fairly new field of archaeoacoustics, and what it can tell us about where prehistoric people chose to draw or make their artwork. Presenter: Roland Pease Producer: Jack Meegan Picture: Rescuers, fire-fighters, policemen, soldiers and volunteers stand near a flattened building in Mexico City, Credit: Yuri Cortez/AFP/Getty Images
Addiction services; Schizophrenia; Hearts and cancer
Inside Health BBC
access_time1 month ago
Inside Health reveals the poor state of addiction services in England with heroin and morphine related deaths the highest on record. Professor Colin Drummond raises concerns about a split in care between the NHS and Local Authorities since the 2012 Health and Social Care Act. And personal testimony is heard from Alison Bedford Russell whose son George died of a heroin overdose last year. The Care Quality Commission, who is responsible for inspections, has found that 2/3 residential drug and alcohol treatment services failed to meet the required standard. Dr Paul Lelliott, Deputy Chief Investigator of hospitals at the CQC, explains what was discovered. The correct use of medical language is a topic close to Inside Health so Margaret McCartney was naturally drawn to discuss news this week about the misuse of the term Schizophrenia. And as London hosts the first ever Cardio-Oncology Summit in Europe, specialists from both fields discuss how to treat and prevent heart problems in people undergoing therapy for cancer.
Internet of Things
Discovery BBC
access_time1 month ago
Can we Control the Dark Side of the Internet? The Internet is the world's most widely used communications tool. It’s a fast and efficient way of delivering information. However it is also quite dumb, neutral, treating equally all the data it passes around the world. From data that forms scientific research papers, the wealth of social media to keep us all connected with friends and relatives, entertainment or material we would rather not see- from political propaganda to horrific violence, the Internet makes no distinction. Is it time to change that? And can we? In this programme Aleks Krotoski looks at whether it’s possible to use technological fixes to regulate the internet or whether a more political approach is needed to governance of this vital but flawed communications medium. Picture: Human Hand Using Application on Mobile Phone, Credit: Onfokus
Farewell Cassini
The Science Hour BBC
access_time1 month ago
In this special edition of the programme, Roland Pease bids farewell to the Cassini-Huygens mission after 20 years in space. As we record The Science Hour, engineers are plunging the probe into the toxic clouds of Saturn, where it will burn up in the atmosphere. BBC Science Correspondent Jonathan Amos reports on its progress from JPL’s mission control in California and Professor Lucie Green discuss why the demise is bitter-sweet. We delve into the archives to see what Cassini-Huygens has discovered and ask whether its moons could harbour life. Plus, could Hurricanes Harvey and Irma be linked to global warming? Looking at data collected over the last decade, the number of hurricanes each season may not change, but it is possible that strong storms will get even stronger. And are you in danger of becoming addicted to television? Gareth Mitchell speaks to one of the makers of BBC iPlayer to ask whether making TV moreish is a good thing. Finally, Claudia Hammond examines two books shortlisted for the Royal Society Insight Investment Science Book Prize. (Image caption: An undated handout photo made available by Nasa shows an illustration of Nasa's Cassini spacecraft during its final plunge into Saturn’s atmosphere © EPA/Nasa/JPL-Caltech) The Science Hour was presented by Roland Pease with comments from Professor Lucie Green, UCL Producer: Graihagh Jackson
Science and the Search for the Truth, with Bill Nye
StarTalk Radio StarTalk Radio
access_time1 month ago
What’s the best way to stay scientifically literate in a world of “alternative facts”? Bill Nye, co-host Chuck Nice, and The Atlantic’s senior editor, Ross Andersen are here to help your science skills stay sharp and offer ways to seek out the truth. NOTE: StarTalk All-Access subscribers can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free. Find out more at https://www.startalkradio.net/startalk-all-access/
#ICYMI: The Immaculate Reception
StarTalk Radio StarTalk Radio
access_time1 month ago
Gary O’Reilly and Chuck Nice turn to physics to try and solve the mystery of the Immaculate Reception, the most famous – and controversial – play in NFL history. With Neil deGrasse Tyson, NFL QB Ryan Fitzpatrick, physicist John Eric Goff, and sports writer Jim Brennan. Don’t miss an episode of Playing with Science. Subscribe to our channels on: Apple Podcasts: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/playing-with-science/id1198280360?mt=2 GooglePlay Music: https://play.google.com/music/listen?u=0#/ps/Iimke5bwpoh2nb25swchmw6kzjq SoundCloud: https://soundcloud.com/startalk_playing-with-science Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/startalk/playing-with-science TuneIn: http://www.tunein.com/playingwithscience NOTE: StarTalk All-Access subscribers can watch/listen to this entire episode commercial-free. Find out more at https://www.startalkradio.net/startalk-all-access/
Hurricanes and Global Warming
Science in Action BBC
access_time1 month ago
In the last few weeks, Hurricanes Harvey and Irma have been breaking records as they caused devastating damage in the Atlantic. Is there a link between global warming and these mega hurricanes? Looking at data collected over the last decade, the number of hurricanes each season may not change, but it is possible that strong storms will get even stronger. Spurious Correlations Understanding whether events that appear to be connected are one thing caused by the other, or just simple correlation, or patterns of trends, can be a tricky business. But it’s the key to understanding cause and coincidence. Silvia Lazzaris looks at the weird and wonderfully, spuriously correlated world we live in. The Future of NASA Ellen Stofan, former NASA Chief Scientist, shares her opinion on the new nominee for NASA administrator, Jim Bridenstine. She talks about the role of NASA in leading scientific enquiry and its responsibility to exploring space and in building human resilience to extreme weather events like hurricanes. Picture: Hurricane Katia (l) Hurricane Irma (m) and Hurricane Jose (r) in the Atlantic Ocean on September 7, 2017, credit: NOAA
Dark Side of the World Wide Web
Discovery BBC
access_time1 month ago
With the coming of the World Wide Web in the 1990s internet access opened up to everybody, it was no longer the preserve of academics and computer hobbyists. Already prior to the Web, the burgeoning internet user groups and chat rooms had tested what was acceptable behaviour online, but access was still limited. Aleks Krotoski asks whether the Web through enabling much wider use of the internet is the villain of the piece in facilitating not just entertainment and commerce, but all aspects of the darker side, from malicious computer hacking attacks, worms and viruses, to new channels for criminality, online extortion and identity theft. (Photo: Internet sign. Credit: code6d)
North Korea Bomb Tests
The Science Hour BBC
access_time1 month ago
Last week, North Korea tested their sixth and largest nuclear warhead since 2006. State media claimed it was a hydrogen bomb. Scientists across the world are looking for signals to help determine how developed their nuclear programme is. Although stress doesn’t cause cancer, experiments suggest that stress hormones might be implicated in tumour progression. A team has been trying to understand this mechanism to boost the chances of chemotherapy working. And what role does graphic design play in your health? Claudia Hammond visits an exhibition that claims just changing the colour of a cigarette packet to sludge green has saved thousands of lives. As children go back to school, we ask how robots could aid learning. We learn why the cuckoo bird makes a strange cackling call after laying an egg in the red warbler’s nest. We also have the future of rooftop farming - aquaponics and how fish excrement should be used to fertilise your plants. Finally, we take a look at some of the books shortlisted for the Royal Society Insight Investment Science Book Prize and tackle the big questions, like how to live forever. (Photo caption: North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un looking at a metal casing with two bulges at an undisclosed location © STR/AFP/Getty Images) The Science Hour was presented by Claudia Hammond with comments from Marnie Chesterton, presenter of BBC World Service’s CrowdScience Producer: Graihagh Jackson
Cosmic Jazz, with Wayne Shorter and Herbie Hancock
StarTalk Radio StarTalk Radio
access_time1 month ago
Neil deGrasse Tyson gets his improv on with legendary jazz musicians Wayne Shorter and Herbie Hancock. Featuring Chuck Nice, Sean Ono Lennon, Stephen Tyson, Mona Chalabi, Charles Limb, and the Columbia University Jazz House. NOTE: StarTalk All-Access subscribers can listen to this entire episode commercial-free. Find out more at https://www.startalkradio.net/startalk-all-access/
North Korean Nuclear Bombs
Science in Action BBC
access_time1 month ago
What we know and don’t know about North Korea’s nuclear programme. Last week North Korea tested their sixth nuclear warhead since 2006. The bomb they detonated in an underground cave was the biggest one yet. North Korean state media claimed they have developed a hydrogen bomb. Scientists from all over the world are looking for signs and signals to help determine exactly what’s going on in the secretive state and to see how developed their nuclear weapons programme actually is. The trouble is, they don’t have much to go on. Seismic shaking and possible radioactive elements released into the atmosphere coupled with pictures put out by Korean media are adding up to a worrying picture of a possible 100 kiloton thermonuclear weapon. Aquaponics Roland Pease visits Benz Kotzen at the EU Aquaponics Hub to learn how a contained system of growing fish and plants can provide a sustainable way of feeding people in developing nations. Recycling Waste disposal is a growing concern as nations run out of space and ecosystems are increasingly polluted. How do we safely get rid of non-biodegradable plastics? Microorganisms may hold the key for turning household waste into biodegradable plastic and perhaps one day even into food. Picture: North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un looking at a metal casing with two bulges at an undisclosed location, Credit: STR/AFP/Getty Images
#ICYMI: Cosmic Queries: Tennis Special Edition
StarTalk Radio StarTalk Radio
access_time1 month ago
Are you ready for a deep dive into hardcore tennis physics? This week, Gary O’Reilly and Chuck Nice welcome back sports physicist John Eric Goff to answer fan-submitted questions about tennis, from the silly to the serious. Don’t miss an episode of Playing with Science. Subscribe to our channels on: Apple Podcasts: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/playing-with-science/id1198280360?mt=2 GooglePlay Music: https://play.google.com/music/listen?u=0#/ps/Iimke5bwpoh2nb25swchmw6kzjq SoundCloud: https://soundcloud.com/startalk_playing-with-science Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/startalk/playing-with-science TuneIn: http://www.tunein.com/playingwithscience NOTE: StarTalk All-Access subscribers can watch/listen to this entire episode commercial-free. Find out more at https://www.startalkradio.net/startalk-all-access/
The Origin of the Internet
Discovery BBC
access_time2 months ago
Just how did the Internet become the most powerful communications medium on the planet, and why does it seem to be an uncontrollable medium for good and bad? With no cross border regulation the internet can act as an incredible force for connecting people and supporting human rights and yet at the same time convey the most offensive material imaginable. It has become the most useful research tool on earth but also the most effective way of delivering threats to the security of governments, the health service and on a personal level our own identities. In this series Aleks Krotoski unravels the complexity of the internet, meeting the people who really invented it, looking behind the myths and cultural constructs to explain what it actually is and how it came to exist outside of conventional regulation. We’ll ask whether the nature of the net itself really is cause for concern - and if so what can be done to reign in the negatives of the internet without restricting the positives? In this first episode we go back to the days before the internet to look at the cultural and technological landscape from which it grew, and unravel some of the key moments - now lost in time and obscured by technology folklore, which mark when the internet lost its innocence. Picture: Mechanical computer keyboard blurred, credit: OSchaumann/Getty
Hurricane Harvey
The Science Hour BBC
access_time2 months ago
As the flood waters recede, we see how the careful forecasting of Hurricane Harvey gave authorities and first responders hours to prepare for its arrival. Last week, a chemical ‘haze’ saw 150 Brits needing hospital treatment. Symptoms included streaming eyes, sore throats and nausea. But its origins remain unclear and an investigation is underway. Acid attacks are on the rise in London, and so what should you do if this happens? We also look to countries like India and Bangladesh who have managed to curb this type of violence. Women in the world’s newest country, South Sudan, have a one in seven chance of dying in childbirth. But the next generation of trainee midwives is hoping to make it safer. For some, childbirth can be an incredibly uncomfortable experience. Is there a way we could manage pain better? Children in karate classes are taught how to manage the inevitable discomfort that comes with a punch. Can we change our perception of pain? From the animal kingdom, we find out why flies can outsmart us and meet the real life Dr Doolittle, who serenades seals to learn about animal communication. (Picture caption: Rescuers from Odessa, Texas make their way along Eldridge Parkway in the Energy Corridor of west Houston © Erich Schlegel/Getty Images) The Science Hour was presented by Roland Pease with comments from Jonathan Amos, BBC Science Correspondent Producer: Graihagh Jackson
Extended Classic: Cosmic Queries – Dark Mysteries of the Universe
StarTalk Radio StarTalk Radio
access_time2 months ago
Black holes, neutron stars, the multiverse, and much more. Neil deGrasse Tyson and comic co-host Leighann Lord delve into the dark mysteries of the universe – now extended with a cosmic conversation between Neil and Matt O’Dowd, host of PBS Space Time. NOTE: StarTalk All-Access subscribers can listen to this entire episode commercial-free. Find out more at https://www.startalkradio.net/startalk-all-access/
Forecasting Hurricane Harvey
Science in Action BBC
access_time2 months ago
Hurricane Harvey has killed at least 31 people so far. Global collaborations enabled scientists to accurately predict Harvey four days before it hit Houston. This is a huge improvement in predictions since hurricane Katrina in 2005. How have these improvements come about and can we expect even better predictions in the future? A flood-damaged plant near Houston has exploded and emitted chemicals. What caused the explosion and what can we expect to happen? Two weeks from its death-plunge into Saturn’s atmosphere, the Cassini spacecraft has approached a completely unexplored region between Saturn’s rings. Data sent backs reveals that the rings are younger than expected. New research reveals that birds may be able to sing intricate melodies thanks to their physiology rather than because of neural complexity as previously believed. Moving beyond anecdotal knowledge, science has finally found the neural basis for contagious yawning. The PETM was the greatest warming event in Earth’s history. New research reveals that the warming was caused by a large volcanic event. How far can we use the PETM to better our understanding of our current warming event? Picture: Epic Flooding Inundates Houston After Hurricane Harvey, credit: Win McNamee/Getty Images Presenter: Roland Pease Producer: Caroline Steel
#ICYMI - Tennis: Inside the Royal Game
StarTalk Radio StarTalk Radio
access_time2 months ago
Chuck Nice and Gary O’Reilly serve up some of the surprising science surrounding the sport of tennis, with a little help from astrophysicist Charles Liu, professional tennis player Jared Donaldson, and Ron Rocchi, the Advanced Innovation Manager at Wilson. Don’t miss an episode of Playing with Science. Subscribe to our channels on: Apple Podcasts: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/playing-with-science/id1198280360?mt=2 GooglePlay Music: https://play.google.com/music/listen?u=0#/ps/Iimke5bwpoh2nb25swchmw6kzjq SoundCloud: https://soundcloud.com/startalk_playing-with-science Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/startalk/playing-with-science TuneIn: http://www.tunein.com/playingwithscience NOTE: StarTalk All-Access subscribers can watch/listen to this entire episode commercial-free. Find out more at https://www.startalkradio.net/startalk-all-access/
Silicon - The World's Building Block
Discovery BBC
access_time2 months ago
Silicon is literally everywhere in both the natural and built environment, from the dominance of silicate rocks in the earth crust, to ubiquitous sand in building materials and as the basis for glass. We've also harnessed silicon's properties as a semiconductor to build the modern electronics industry - without silicon personal computers and smartphones would simply not exist. Silicon is also found widely across the universe. It is formed in stars, particularly when they explode. And the similarities between how silicon and carbon form chemical bonds has led many to wonder whether there could be silicon based life elsewhere - perhaps in some far flung part of the galaxy where carbon is not as abundant as here on earth. As well as discussing the potential for silicon based life on other planets, Birkbeck University astrobiologist Dr Louisa Preston considers the varied uses of silicon here on earth, from its dominance in our built environment to its driving role in artificial intelligence and its ability to harness the sun's energy. Image: Lump of silicon on solar panels Credit: wloven/Getty Images
Conservation Clashes
The Science Hour BBC
access_time2 months ago
Brazil has opened a rainforest reserve to mining. There are conservation concerns but also for the indigenous who live there. Gareth Mitchell has been exploring the dangers of neglecting local beliefs about nature when developing conservation schemes. Flooding in India, Nepal and Bangladesh has claimed 800 lives. Geography and climate are the cause but humans are making it worse. We stay in India, where a dose of “good bacteria” has cut infant deaths from sepsis by 40%. And in Chile, dairy farmers are using copper to reduce rates of udder infections. According to leading robotics experts, it is time to stop the development of ‘killer robots’. In a letter to the UN, they have called for a ban on the use of Artificial Intelligence in managing weaponry. Trees take in carbon dioxide and emit oxygen, but their leaves also attract tiny particles, which can get into our lungs and brains. So how good are they at cleaning our clogged up skies? Musicians often feel nervous before a performance. Talented music students at the Royal College of Music in London have been trying out a digital mock-up of a performance – complete with grim-faced judges on a screen – to overcoming anxiety. (Picture caption: Aerial Shot of Amazon rainforest in Brazil, South America © Getty Images) The Science Hour was presented by Gareth Mitchell with comments from freelance science journalist, Dr Claire Ainsworth Producer: Graihagh Jackson
Cosmic Queries: TV Sci-Fi with Bill Nye
StarTalk Radio StarTalk Radio
access_time2 months ago
Who better to answer fan-submitted questions about science fiction on TV and in the movies than Bill Nye? Bill and Chuck Nice flip channels between “Star Trek,” “Star Wars,” “Lost in Space,” “Gilligan’s Island,” “Back to the Future,” and more. (Adult Language.) NOTE: StarTalk All-Access subscribers can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free. Find out more at https://www.startalkradio.net/startalk-all-access/
#ICYMI - NFL Fitness and Nutrition
StarTalk Radio StarTalk Radio
access_time2 months ago
Chuck and Gary get schooled by the men who optimize player performance for the pros: Glen Tobias of the NY Jets, and Dave Puloka and Wayne Diesel of the Miami Dolphins. Neil Tyson interviews quarterback Ryan Fitzpatrick and former players John Urschel and Terry Crews. Don’t miss an episode of Playing with Science. Subscribe to our channels on: Apple Podcasts: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/playing-with-science/id1198280360?mt=2 GooglePlay Music: https://play.google.com/music/listen?u=0#/ps/Iimke5bwpoh2nb25swchmw6kzjq SoundCloud: https://soundcloud.com/startalk_playing-with-science Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/startalk/playing-with-science TuneIn: http://www.tunein.com/playingwithscience NOTE: StarTalk All-Access subscribers can watch/listen to this entire episode commercial-free. Find out more at https://www.startalkradio.net/startalk-all-access/
Preventing Flood Damage in South Asia
Science in Action BBC
access_time2 months ago
Floods in South Asia have claimed the lives of over 800 people. International collaboration is required to repair rivers and coasts in order to avoid such a high toll in the future. The first legal online rhino horn auction opened yesterday. South African rhino breeders often de-horn their animals in order to avoid poaching, they hope to legally sell these horns to raise funds for protecting rhino against poaching. A new study urges scientists to consider cultural superstitions, legends and myths when working to conserve animals and habitats. The Amazon pink river dolphin is heralded as a shape-shifter, and in the Caribbean, owls are thought to be witches that suck out the brains of sleeping locals. These myths should be respected and understood to enable scientists to work with local people to conserve species. A new study reports using virtual reality to study the physiology and behaviour of fish, mice and flies. These animals aren’t wearing tiny VR glasses, but instead are living in a world made up of projections. When a dairy cow becomes infected with bacteria causing bovine mastitis, the milk must be disposed of and the cow treated with expensive antibiotics. Farmers in Chile are reducing infection rates by lining milking tanks with copper which has antibacterial properties. (Photo caption: An Indian man wades along a flooded street during a heavy downpour in Agartala © Arindam Dey/AFP/Getty Images) Presenter: Roland Pease Producer: Caroline Steel
The Day the Sun Went Dark
Discovery BBC
access_time2 months ago
For the first time in almost 100 years the USA is experiencing a full solar eclipse from coast to coast on August 21st 2017. Main image: Totality during the solar eclipse at Palm Cove on November 14, 2012 in Palm Cove, Australia. Credit: Ian Hitchcock / Getty Images