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Science & Medicine Podcast

21 Rules For Life by a Japanese Samurai | The Way of Walking Alone 宮本武蔵
Psychology In Hindi Saurabh Gandhi
access_time2 days ago
Miyamoto Musashi was Japanese samurai and philosopher. When he was 15 years old, he left his home for musha shugyo, which is a warrior's pilgrimage. In his life, Musashi fought 61 duels out of which he lost 0 fights. After fighting his most difficult opponent and some minor fights, he retired and went to live in the mountains where he started written down his philosophy. In his last work, Dokkodo i.e. The way of walking alone, he wrote 21 rules for living a good life. So, in this podcast segment, we will be discussing these 21 rules written by one of the greatest Japanese samurais.
Toxic Positivity - The Dark Side of Positivity & Self Help
Psychology In Hindi Saurabh Gandhi
access_time2 days ago
Toxic positivity refers to the belief and promotion of the idea that in every difficult situation, excessive positivity will get you out of it. It is an obsession with positive thinking, which makes one blind to the darkness inside as well as outside of him. This partial view of reality is not only toxic to the one preaching this idea but the people whom he's discussing this with. So, in this podcast segment, we will go deeper into this toxic and understand why and how people become so toxically positive.
Covid and clean air
Science in Action BBC
access_time2 days ago
We wouldn’t drink dirty water so why do we put up with polluted air? Researchers are calling for a major rethink on our attitude to air quality. Professor Lidia Morawska, from the Queensland University of Technology, says attention to air quality during the Covid pandemic has shown how levels of airborne disease can be reduced. Sam Wilson from the UK Medical Research Council, University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research has been investigating genetic mechanisms associated with susceptibility to Covid infection. His team has identified a molecule that detects SARS-COV-2 when it starts to replicate in our cells. However, not all humans have this protective mechanism, which may help explain why some people become very ill with Covid and others have little if any symptoms. Many Europeans lack this protective molecule, whereas the vast majority of Africans have it. The difference can be seen in cell cultures. However, the lack of diversity in the cells used in experiments worldwide can be a serious problem when looking at genetic differences as Samara Linton reports. Nuclear material buried beneath the doomed Chernobyl nuclear power plant is becoming more active Neil Hyatt Professor of Nuclear Materials Chemistry at Sheffield University says it’s a small increase but needs to be monitored. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images) Presenter: Roland Pease Producer: Alex Mansfield
Longitude
In Our Time: Science BBC
access_time3 days ago
Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the search for Longitude while at sea. Following efforts by other maritime nations, the British Government passed the Longitude Act in 1714 to reward anyone who devised reliable means for ships to determine their longitude at sea. Mariners could already calculate how far they were north or south, the Latitude, using the Pole Star, but voyaging across the Atlantic to the Caribbean was much less predictable as navigators could not be sure how far east or west they were, a particular problem when heading for islands. It took fifty years of individual genius and collaboration in Britain and across Europe, among astronomers, clock makers, mathematicians and sailors, for the problem to be resolved. With Rebekah Higgitt Principal Curator of Science at National Museums Scotland Jim Bennett Keeper Emeritus at the Science Museum And Simon Schaffer Professor of History and Philosophy of Science at the University of Cambridge Producer: Simon Tillotson
7 Signs You Have Unhealed Trauma
Psychology In Hindi Saurabh Gandhi
access_time4 days ago
A psychological trauma is the result of a stressful past event that you still haven't overcome yet. When a tragic event is so high in intensity, our body shuts down and we enter survival mode. If the knowledge of event never gets processed, the survival mode remains on years after the event. But many people are never able to understand whether what they have is a trauma or something else. That's why in this podcast segment, we will go over 7 signs of having an unhealed trauma.
Patient zero: spillover in suburbia
Discovery BBC
access_time5 days ago
Episode One: Spillover in Suburbia A horse mysteriously falls ill in her paddock, and before long dozens of other horses from her stables are sick. As the horses start to die vicious, painful deaths, their trainer falls into a coma and is placed into intensive care. The race is on to figure out what's making both species sick, and where it came from. What they find will resonate throughout the following decades and might help us uncover the origins of COVID-19. Presented by Olivia Willis Patient Zero is a production of ABC Science, Radio National, and the BBC World Service. Picture: Wild horses, Credit: Phil Copp/Getty Images
How COVID-19 transformed the future of medicine | Daniel Kraft
TEDTalks Science and Medicine TEDTalks
access_time5 days ago
The pandemic forced the world to work together like never before and, with unprecedented speed, bore a new age of health and medical innovation. Physician-scientist Daniel Kraft explains how breakthroughs and advancements like AI-infused antiviral discoveries and laboratory-level diagnostic tools accessible via smartphones are paving the way for a more democratized, connected and data-driven future of medicine and personalized care.
How to Gain Self-Respect
Psychology In Hindi Saurabh Gandhi
access_time5 days ago
Self Respect is something that relates to having confidence in one's own ability and value as a human being. One takes pride in his abilities, knows their worth and don't let anyone cross the boundaries that they've created. Simply put, if you believe you're worthy of being treated well, you've a healthy self respect. So, in this podcast segment, we will help those who struggle with having any sort of respect for themselves or holding themselves in esteem.
5 Common Dreams & Their Meanings
Psychology In Hindi Saurabh Gandhi
access_time6 days ago
Dreams are the result of our unconscious mind helping and guiding us in order to get a better picture of the world and our place in it. Dreams are usually unique to the person as they're context dependent. But there are some universal dreams that most people experience at some point of their lives, if we understand the psychology behind these dreams, we'll be able to understand how to interpret any dream in their metaphorical stories and images. So, in this podcast segment, we talk about 5 such common dreams and their meanings to give you an example of how dreams are interpreted in Jungian Psychology.
Africa’s oldest burial
The Science Hour BBC
access_time6 days ago
Analysis of the 78,0000-year-old fossil of a Kenyan boy reveals he was likely buried with care and attention, the body wrapped and laid to rest supported on a pillow. Maria Martinon-Torres, of the National Research Centre on Human Evolution in Burgos, Spain, and a team from Kenya and Germany used techniques from paleontology and forensic science to reveal his story from the fragile remains. A promising malaria vaccine is to enter trials which could lead to it being used globally to vaccinate children. Merheen Datoo, Oxford University’s Jenner Institute, explains malaria vaccines have been in development for 100 years. Research from these helped covid vaccine development and the success of covid vaccines may now help to speed up the rollout of malaria vaccines. Covid vaccines may also help to treat those who have symptoms of long covid – a range of immune system issues that develop sometimes months after the initial infection. Yale University immunologist Akiko Kawasaki is embarking on a research project to assess the impact. If you’d like to take part, have yet to be vaccinated, and live in Connecticut in the US, email covidrecovery@yale.edu. And in India scientists are calling on the government to make all data on Covid more widely available. At present Indian bureaucracy means statistics on infection rates, variants and recovery are not distributed widely. Science journalist TV Padma says greater access to the data could help more scientists come together to work on solutions to India’s Covid crisis. And, Have you taken classes to learn a new sport or musical instrument or a language? It’s hard work! Why is it that as children we effortlessly absorb new skills and we don’t as adults? That’s what 50-something listener Gary Grief wondered about playing guitar. Do you need to play more frequently as an adult to attain the same level of expertise? Does the 10,000-hours theory still apply? Presenter and budding tabla-player Anand Jagatia embarks on a musical journey to discover what neuroscience can tell us about muscle memory and learning. Do musicians and sportsmen share the same challenges? By understanding what’s happening in the brain, can we learn how to learn better? With tabla-teacher Satvinder Sehmbey, neuroscientist Dr Jessica Grahn, viola-player Dr Molly Gebrian and sports scientist Prof Yannis Pitsiladis. (Image: An artist’s interpretation of Mtoto’s burial Credit: Fernando Fueyo)
Philosophy of Yin Yang - Wisdom for a Balanced Life
Psychology In Hindi Saurabh Gandhi
access_time7 days ago
Yin Yang is one of the most important concept in Chinese philosophy and their religion i.e. TAOISM. Yin Yang signifies the duality of reality and explains us the importance of staying in the middle of the polar opposites. In this podcast segment we will explore this idea more, understand yin yang with daily life examples and how you can use this philosophy to improve the quality of your life.
Can Exes be Friends?
Psychology In Hindi Saurabh Gandhi
access_time8 days ago
Whenever someone goes through a breakup, it is common to see them considering being friends with their ex. We think that just because we spend a lot of time with this person, they know all our secrets and we still love them, it would be a good idea to stay friends. This is a SUNK COST FALLACY. So, in this podcast segment we will discover whether this idea of stay friends after breakup work in real life or not.
Africa’s oldest burial
Science in Action BBC
access_time9 days ago
Analysis of the 78,0000-year-old fossil of a Kenyan boy reveals he was likely buried with care and attention, the body wrapped and laid to rest supported on a pillow. Maria Martinon-Torres, of the National Research Centre on Human Evolution in Burgos, Spain, and a team from Kenya and Germany used techniques from paleontology and forensic science to reveal his story from the fragile remains. A promising malaria vaccine is to enter trials which could lead to it being used globally to vaccinate children. Merheen Datoo, Oxford University’s Jenner Institute, explains malaria vaccines have been in development for 100 years. Research from these helped covid vaccine development and the success of covid vaccines may now help to speed up the rollout of malaria vaccines. Covid vaccines may also help to treat those who have symptoms of long covid – a range of immune system issues that develop sometimes months after the initial infection. Yale University immunologist Akiko Kawasaki is embarking on a research project to assess the impact. If you’d like to take part, have yet to be vaccinated, and live in Connecticut in the US, email covidrecovery@yale.edu. And in India scientists are calling on the government to make all data on Covid more widely available. At present Indian bureaucracy means statistics on infection rates, variants and recovery are not distributed widely. Science journalist TV Padma says greater access to the data could help more scientists come together to work on solutions to India’s Covid crisis. (Image: An artist’s interpretation of Mtoto’s burial Credit: Fernando Fueyo) Presenter: Roland Pease Producer: Julian Siddle
Time Management की 5 Tips
Psychology In Hindi Saurabh Gandhi
access_time11 days ago
It doesn't matter how hard working or rich we become, we will get the same 24 hours in our day just like others. During this time we have to decide which activities or tasks do we want to prioritize and which to delay. But sometimes we waste a lot of our precious time because we don't know how to manage it. So, in this podcast segment, we will discuss about how we can manage our time, be more smart and efficient in our work, and master time like no one else.
The noises that make us cringe
Discovery BBC
access_time12 days ago
Why do some people find noises like a fork scraping a plate so terrible? asks Findlay in Aberdeenshire. Rutherford and Fry endure some horrible noises to find out the answer. Warning - This episode contains some horrible sounds Trevor Cox, Professor of Acoustic Engineering at the University of Salford, has run experiments to find out the worst, most cringe-making sound. He divided horrible sounds into three categories: scraping sounds, like nails down a blackboard; disgusting sounds like a snotty sniffy nose; and sounds that make us cringe because of what we associate them with, like the dentist’s drill. All horrible sounds have some sort of association whether it’s a primal scream or fear of catching a disease, and they’re dealt with in the ancient part of the brain – the amygdala. Professor Tim Griffiths is a Cognitive Neurologist at Newcastle University’s Auditory Cognition Group. He has been studying people with misophonia, a condition where ordinary, everyday sounds, such as someone eating or breathing causes a severe anxiety and anger response. Misophonia may affect around 15% of the population and Tim thinks that different parts of the brain – the insula and the motor cortex - are involved in this fight or flight response to seemingly innocuous sounds. Cat Thomas’s job is to make horrible sounds. She is a foley artist at Boompost. If you watch Call the Midwife or Peaky Blinders, all the incidental sounds are created by Cat and her team. She also created some of the sounds for the horror film Camilla, which involved evisceration and disembowelling with the aid of some squishy oranges and bananas. Adam Rutherford and Hannah Fry try their own horror sounds when they chop off a finger with the aid of some large pasta shells, an orange and a knife. Presenters: Hannah Fry & Adam Rutherford Producer: Fiona Roberts
Stop Selling Yourself Short & Know Your Value
Psychology In Hindi Saurabh Gandhi
access_time13 days ago
Many of us underestimate ourselves and we can't assess our true value as a human being. We present ourselves in such a way that others also start getting this message that we are only what we're putting at display for others and that's what all our potential is. But if you also happen to do the same thing and your friends/family have to remind you about your achievements or success, then you need to learn to value yourself and in this podcast segment, we will discuss how exactly we can do that.
5 Signs of
Psychology In Hindi Saurabh Gandhi
access_time13 days ago
Fake nice people are those who hide their bad intentions with a mask of virtue and niceness. These people look so kind when you first meet them but after a while, they start showing their true colors and their niceness seems to disappear altogether. So, in this podcast segment, we will talk about 5 signs of such fake nice people, so that the next time you encounter one, you'll be more careful around them and maintain a healthy distance from them.
How to NOT Get Offended
Psychology In Hindi Saurabh Gandhi
access_time13 days ago
Everybody seems to get offended all of a sudden, little things trigger us. For many of us, words should now be equally treated as violence. But why? And how do we get out of this state of remaining perpetually offended by everything see, listen or hear? This podcast segment attempts to answer these questions and teach you how you can develop a thick skin so that nothing that other people say or do will offend you and you will able to think clearly as well as take wise decisions.
Melting glaciers, warming coffee and a Dragonfly on Titan
The Science Hour BBC
access_time14 days ago
When Apollo 11 astronaut Michael Collins – who passed away this week – looked down on the earth from lunar orbit during those days in 1969, he saw more ice and a smaller liquid ocean than you would see today. Of the 200,000 glaciers outside of the polar and Greenland ice sheets, their melting in the last two decades accounts for about a fifth of the sea level rise we are also seeing. Thus according to a paper published this week in the journal nature by, amongst others Bob McNabb of Ulster University who describes to Roland how and why these numbers are more certain than others before. As fellow earth observation expert Anna Hogg adds, the work synthesises years of data from almost half a million images of glaciers taken from space, and provides our best handle yet on our accelerating loss of this finite and dwindling natural feature. Researchers at Kew in the UK and in Sierra Leone have re-discovered a species of coffee plant once thought lost. As Marnie Chesterton reports, climate change threatens many coffee crops around the world as the most popular variety – arabica – needs cool high altitude conditions which are going to become more scarce. But after a long and arduous search, the researchers have discovered a more resilient variety that might not only save the morning brew for many, it may even prove agriculturally and even economically transformative for some African economies. And whilst many of us watch the antics of NASA’s Martian helicopter, Ingenuity, as it whizzes across the distant plains of “Wright’s Field” aerodrome on Mars, some are watching with more trepidation than others. In 6 years’ time, Zibi Turtle, Principle Investigator of NASA’s Dragonfly mission, hopes to launch a much larger octocopter drone to Titan, moon of Saturn. As she describes to Roland, the challenges are huge, not least because dragonfly will carry all its instruments on board as it hops around, finding new landing sites autonomously. And communicating with Earth will take a whopping hour each way. When eating a blackberry one day, CrowdScience listener Charles got a tiny seed stuck in his teeth. That got him wondering: why are seeds the size they are? Why does a blackberry have dozens of tiny pips, while a peach has one huge stone right in the middle? Plant seeds have been around for hundreds of millions of years, so they’ve had plenty of time to shapeshift into wildly different forms: from dust-like orchid seeds to giant coconuts. This evolution has been a long and intricate dance with wind, water and animals; we ask how different kinds of seeds might respond to today’s environmental threats and rapidly changing ecosystems. And we go in search of the world’s biggest seed, the coco de mer: native to just two remote islands in the Indian Ocean and weighing up to 18kg, how did this seed evolve to be so much bigger than any other? (Image: The lunar module , carrying Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin, ascends back up to the command module with Michael Collins. It is often said that Michael Collins is the only human, living or dead, who is not in this photograph. Credit: Michael Collins / NASA)
Stay in or Leave - a Relationship
Psychology In Hindi Saurabh Gandhi
access_time15 days ago
The purpose of a relationship is to find someone who'd stand by your side through thick and thin. To whom, your specific being will be the most important and they will also help you become your best self. But sometimes relationships get corrupted and the person who was supposed to push you forward, brings you down and you cannot compute whether you should leave or stay in this relationship and in this podcast segment we will try to answer this very same question.
Melting glaciers, warming coffee and a Dragonfly on Titan
Science in Action BBC
access_time16 days ago
When Apollo 11 astronaut Michael Collins – who passed away this week – looked down on the earth from lunar orbit during those days in 1969, he saw more ice and a smaller liquid ocean than you would see today. Of the 200,000 glaciers outside of the polar and Greenland ice sheets, their melting in the last two decades accounts for about a fifth of the sea level rise we are also seeing. Thus according to a paper published this week in the journal nature by, amongst others Bob McNabb of Ulster University who describes to Roland how and why these numbers are more certain than others before. As fellow earth observation expert Anna Hogg adds, the work synthesises years of data from almost half a million images of glaciers taken from space, and provides our best handle yet on our accelerating loss of this finite and dwindling natural feature. Researchers at Kew in the UK and in Sierra Leone have rediscovered a species of coffee plant once thought lost. As Marnie Chesterton reports, climate change threatens many coffee crops around the world as the most popular variety – arabica – needs cool high altitude conditions which are going to become more scarce. But after a long and arduous search, the researchers have discovered a more resilient variety that might not only save the morning brew for many, it may even prove agriculturally and even economically transformative for some African economies. And whilst many of us watch the antics of NASA’s Martian helicopter, Ingenuity, as it whizzes across the distant plains of “Wright’s Field” aerodrome on Mars, some are watching with more trepidation than others. In 6 years’ time, Zibi Turtle, Principle Investigator of NASA’s Dragonfly mission, hopes to launch a much larger octocopter drone to Titan, moon of Saturn. As she describes to Roland, the challenges are huge, not least because dragonfly will carry all its instruments on board as it hops around, finding new landing sites autonomously. And communicating with Earth will take a whopping hour each way. (Image: The lunar module, carrying Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin, ascends back up to the command module with Michael Collins. It is often said that Michael Collins is the only human, living or dead, who is not in this photograph. Credit: Michael Collins / NASA) Presenter: Roland Pease Producer: Alex Mansfield
5 Reasons Why You Feel Empty
Psychology In Hindi Saurabh Gandhi
access_time19 days ago
To feel empty is to lose the passion towards life itself which in return create feelings of hopelessness and sadness. When you're in this phase of your life, you start questioning everything and life seem meaningless to you. You focus shifts from everyday chores to existential thoughts and pessimism. In short term, this feeling of emptiness can immensely help you grow and gain new insights, but in the long term, this feeling will not only make you depressed but it will also rob you off your life's meaning. That's why in this podcast segment, we discuss reasons why we feel empty and what can we do about it.
What To Do When You Feel Lost In Life
Psychology In Hindi Saurabh Gandhi
access_time19 days ago
Feeling lost in life is something that is usually seen in those people who have faced a crisis or the people who lost all their value/belief systems by questioning them and now they don't know what to do in their lives. When everything feels pointless, a person needs more than just hope. That's why in this podcast segment, we try to solve this existential problem & figure out how we can make our way back into a healthy lifestyle where our lives are full of meaning and joy.
The Hamster Power Hypothesis
Discovery BBC
access_time19 days ago
"How many hamsters on wheels would it take to power London?" asks Judah from Virginia in the USA. Rutherford & Fry return with engineering, ethics and economics to answer this electric query. Smart grid engineer Lynne McDonald helps keep the lights on for 8.3 million homes and businesses across London at UK Power Networks. She explains how the kilowatt hours we see on our electricity bills relate to the thousands of gigawatt hours required when thinking about powering the whole of London. In theory, a hamster in a wheel might be able to produce about half a watt of power – enough to run a small LED light bulb. Whilst the doctors argue the case on the resultant practicalities and ethics of even considering such a scenario – as, for example, the required cubic kilometre stack of hamster habitats would cover Canary Wharf – Royal Veterinary College researcher Zoe Davies points out some biological and anatomical home truths. As an expert in biomechanics currently investigating athletic performance in racehorses, she walks Adam through the impossibilities of using pretty much any animal, bird or insect as a source of power. There may be one exception though: humans. Veteran lecturer of undergraduate chemistry for biologists and cycling enthusiast, Andrea Sella discusses whether human power might realistically work. We consider what this or other more realistic sources of renewable energy could mean for the future of our national grid.
Why We Feel So Weird
Psychology In Hindi Saurabh Gandhi
access_time20 days ago
Feeling weird means that we do something or have some thought that we can't tell to other people or even consciously entertain for long durations. This is where we judge our own instincts or random thoughts and judge ourselves for thinking and being such way. But the reality is, this happens to everyone. Weirdness is the only norm, its just that we don't often talk about such things in public. So, in this podcast segment, we will uncover the reasons why people feel so weird or awkward and what can be done about it.
Exponential increase in Indian covid cases
The Science Hour BBC
access_time21 days ago
As Covid cases surge almost beyond belief in India, how much is to do with social distancing, and how much to do with the mutations to the original virus? Ramanan Laxminarayan talks to Roland from Delhi about ways in which the huge second wave could and could not have been predicted and avoided. Suggestions of the latest variant to make the headlines, B1.617, have got virologists such as Ravindra Gupta working hard to identify the clinical significance of the latest combinations of mutations. In the journal Science, Stephen Chanock of the US Cancer program reports work with colleagues in Ukraine looking at the long footprint of radiation dosing from the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, 35 years ago this week. In the first of two papers, they find a definite footprint of radiation damage accounting for the many sad cases of thyroid cancer in people alive in the region at the time. But in another study, they looked at whether any higher level of mutations could be detected in the germlines of children conceived subsequently to parents who had experienced radiation in the disaster. While the parents' own health is often affected, 35 years on, thus far their offspring show no widespread elevated levels of disease, as was commonly expected. And in the week that the world witnessed a guilty verdict delivered in the trial for the murder of George Floyd in the US, David Curtis of the University of Utah and colleagues report in the journal PNAS a study that suggests the widespread media coverage of acts of racial violence, including deaths at the hands of police, leads to poorer mental health in Black Americans. As the BBC’s Samara Linton reports, the study involved google search data over five years up to 2017, and nearly 2.3 million survey respondents. Also, most of us don’t like to dwell on our toilet habits, but this week we have gone down the drain to discover what wastewater can tell us about our health. It’s been more than a year since scientists across the globe started to track the spread of Covid-19, with help from home test results and hospital data. Marnie Chesterton investigates the latest tool in their arsenal: sewage. Listener Kevin has heard how human waste can be monitored to check for virus levels, and wants to know if it can also be used to stop the disease in its tracks? Although the coronavirus has been discovered in people’s poo, so far there’s little indication it’s actually being spread through the water system. But by taking regular samples from different parts of cities, authorities are now able to accurately predict a local peak weeks before the population shows signs of sickness, then take immediate measures to alert them. In Detroit we hear how environmental engineer Professor Irene Zagoraraki used this method to detect a rare strain of Herpes which doctors didn’t even know was a potential problem. We talk to Professor Nick Thomson from the Wellcome Sanger Institute, who sequenced the genome of the bacteria that causes cholera, to understand how it has crisscrossed the globe. He discovered that the pandemic currently devastating Yemen actually originated in Asia. It’s a discovery that has changed how the WHO is thinking about this killer disease and could have important implications for vaccination programmes. But our effluent can also pose environmental problems, and Professor Andrew Johnson from the UK’s Centre for Ecology and Hydrology explains there are now as many as 300,000 chemicals that could threaten natural habitats. While authorities try to test each one individually, he’s concerned they may have different effects when they mix in wastewater, and current monitoring systems don’t take this into account. Not only that, but some of these substances contain silver nanoparticles, which Professor Juliane Filser tells us stick around in soil for ever, threatening organisms and bacteria at the base of the food chain Image: NurPhoto/Getty Images
To Be a Human, Become an ANIMAL First
Psychology In Hindi Saurabh Gandhi
access_time22 days ago
As we humans became modern and civilized, we had to suppress our animalistic instincts which brought us joy, anger, feeling of freedom and every possible emotion on the spectrum of living experience. But suppressing one (bad side) aspect of our past leads to disturbances in our other aspects (good side) of our life as well. We are the animals pretending to be Gods, we are so cut off from our past that it has created a sort of sickness in our soul. A deep longing that cannot be fulfilled by anything but a healthy connection with our old ways of living. This doesn't mean we have to be like savages again, but we have to accept and integrate this dark side of ours in order to not get controlled by it. So, in this podcast segment we talk about why this happened and how we can fix this.
Exponential growth in the Indian Covid cases
Science in Action BBC
access_time23 days ago
As Covid cases surge almost beyond belief in India, how much is to do with social distancing, and how much to do with the mutations to the original virus? Ramanan Laxminarayan talks to Roland from Delhi about ways in which the huge second wave could and could not have been predicted and avoided. Suggestions of the latest variant to make the headlines, B1.617, have got virologists such as Ravindra Gupta working hard to identify the clinical significance of the latest combinations of mutations. In the journal Science, Stephen Chanock of the US Cancer program reports work with colleagues in Ukraine looking at the long footprint of radiation dosing from the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, 35 years ago this week. In the first of two papers, they find a definite footprint of radiation damage accounting for the many sad cases of thyroid cancer in people alive in the region at the time. But in another study, they looked at whether any higher level of mutations could be detected in the germlines of children conceived subsequently to parents who had experienced radiation in the disaster. While the parents' own health is often affected, 35 years on, thus far their offspring show no widespread elevated levels of disease, as was commonly expected. And in the week that the world witnessed a guilty verdict delivered in the trial for the murder of George Floyd in the US, David Curtis of the University of Utah and colleagues report in the journal PNAS a study that suggests the widespread media coverage of acts of racial violence, including deaths at the hands of police, leads to poorer mental health in Black Americans. As the BBC’s Samara Linton reports, the study involved google search data over five years up to 2017, and nearly 2.3 million survey respondents. Image: NurPhoto/Getty Images Presenter: Roland Pease Reporter: Samara Linton Producer: Alex Mansfield
5 Mistakes Confident People NEVER Make
Psychology In Hindi Saurabh Gandhi
access_time23 days ago
Someone gets called "confident" when they intrinsically feel that whatever decision or action they take is right and they don't feel the need of seeking approval. But if you also want to become more like highly confident people, then you must not make the mistakes that confident people avoid at all costs. So, in this podcast segment, we go over 5 such mistakes or things that confident people never do.
The Backwards Law - Let it go & You'll have it
Psychology In Hindi Saurabh Gandhi
access_time24 days ago
British Philosopher Alan Watts talked about a concept called "The Backwards Law", which states that the more you chase something, the more it will move further ahead and you won't be able to reach it. If you're trying to sleep, you won't be able to sleep. If you're trying to be happy, you won't be happy and similarly this effect manifests itself in almost all aspects of our lives. So, in this podcast segment, we will understand what is this Backwards Law, how does it work and what do you have to do to be more successful and happier.
How your memory works -- and why forgetting is totally OK | Lisa Genova
TEDTalks Science and Medicine TEDTalks
access_time24 days ago
Have you ever misplaced something you were just holding? Completely blanked on a famous actor's name? Walked into a room and immediately forgot why? Neuroscientist Lisa Genova digs into two types of memory failures we regularly experience -- and reassures us that forgetting is totally normal. Stay tuned for a conversation with TED science curator David Biello, where Genova describes the difference between common moments of forgetting and possible signs of Alzheimer's, debunks a widespread myth about brain capacity and shares what you can do to keep your brain healthy and your memory sharp. (This virtual conversation was part of an exclusive TED Membership event. Visit ted.com/membership to become a TED Member.)
The Martian Mission
Discovery BBC
access_time26 days ago
What would it take for humans to live permanently on Mars? asks Martin in Weston-super-Mare, UK. The doctors dig into requirements and possibilities of a long-term Martian outpost. We know that many missions to Mars have failed, for a range of reasons – malfunctions, crashes and even a mix-up between imperial and metric units. Getting to Mars – let alone decelerating from 30,000 miles per hour to a safe landing speed in about seven minutes – is not straightforward. Aerospace engineer Anita Sengupta helped land NASA’s Curiosity rover on Mars. She knows first-hand the challenges of putting a robot on the red planet. But getting robots to Mars is an easier proposition than doing the same for humans. Even if we work out how to survive the radiation exposure on the eight-month journey and the pulverising descent, Mars’ surface isn’t easily habitable. Principal investigator for NASA’s Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution Mission (MAVEN) Bruce Jakosky describes the conditions on Mars: Freezing, with an atmosphere containing mostly carbon dioxide and very little water, and subject to annual global dust storms. However, this isn’t deterring space agencies and private companies from researching the challenge. The European Space Agency and Russian Institute for Biomedical Problems focussed on finding out the physiological and psychological tolls by selecting six candidates to spend 520 days in a simulated spacecraft and landing module. Diego Urbina explains the personal challenge of taking part in the Mars500 experiment. Some private company owners have gone even further. As well as making technology based on the current physical conditions, could those constraints themselves be altered? Could Mars be terraformed, or warmed, for easier human survival? Bruce Jakosky shares just what that would take – and compares these requirements with what’s actually available.
How To Talk To Anyone - Communication Skills
Psychology In Hindi Saurabh Gandhi
access_time28 days ago
Many of us stop ourselves from talking to people. Whether it be our fear of being made fun of or a realization of poor communication skills. This fear guides our emotions and actions, and without overcoming this fear we won't ever be able to talk to anyone we want. So, in this podcast segment, we will discuss 4 stages of an interaction, change your mindset and how to improve your communication skills.
Rolling out the vaccines faster
The Science Hour BBC
access_time28 days ago
Two weeks ago several G7 leaders called for an international treaty on Pandemic Preparedness for the future. This week 175 prominent leaders called for lifting the IP on vaccine design. And former UK PM Gordon Brown called on the G7 to finance vaccines for the world in the next two months. But are there technical difficulties that limit the pace of manufacture? Anthony McDonnell is an economist at think tank Centre for Global Development who has been looking at the problem since last year. He suggests, amongst other things, one limit is the human expertise in manufacturing these brand-new technologies, with another being a level of vaccine nationalism that is seeing a lack of exports of components involved in manufacture. Professor Trudie Lang heads the University of Oxford’s Global Health Network, and looks at health research across the world. She says in most countries there is no lack of public health or infrastructure potential for rolling out the vaccines, if only the supply existed. The volcano that erupted explosively on St Vincent last week has led to many thousands of people being evacuated. Dr Joan Latchman of the University of West Indies Seismic Research Centre - who has monitored Caribbean volcanos for several decades - describes from Trinidad how the layers of ash mean recovery will take a long time, even if the explosions and pyroclastic dangers subside reasonably soon. Back in The UK, Prof Jenni Barclay and colleagues are examining rocks from the early part of the eruption, before the explosive phase began, to see if there are clues in the microstructure that could provide clues to the future. And how do our brains so quickly tell a scream of delight from a scream of horror? Or of pain? Prof Sascha Frühholz of the University of Geneva has written in the journal PLOS Biology this week about work looking at how we identify the nature of different human screams. One finding is that we perceive joy quicker than fear. Grief is universal. It is something almost all of us will go through at some point. And it is something that the people we love will experience when we die. Grief can be all consuming, it can make everyday tasks like getting out of bed, feel impossible. Which makes listener Oliver from Australia wonder - what is the point? It doesn’t bring what we lost, back. Why have we evolved to be so affected by loss? Be it the death of a loved one, the end of a relationship or the loss of a job. Does it serve any purpose? Or perhaps it is just the price we pay for being a social species with such strong connections. (Image: Getty Images)
Rolling out the vaccines faster
Science in Action BBC
access_time1 month ago
Two weeks ago several G7 leaders called for an international treaty on Pandemic Preparedness for the future. This week 175 prominent leaders called for lifting the IP on vaccine design. And former UK PM Gordon Brown called on the G7 to finance vaccines for the world in the next two months. But are there technical difficulties that limit the pace of manufacture? Anthony McDonnell is an economist at think tank Centre for Global Development who has been looking at the problem since last year. He suggests, amongst other things, one limit is the human expertise in manufacturing these brand-new technologies, with another being a level of vaccine nationalism that is seeing a lack of exports of components involved in manufacture. Professor Trudie Lang heads the University of Oxford’s Global Health Network, and looks at health research across the world. She says in most countries there is no lack of public health or infrastructure potential for rolling out the vaccines, if only the supply existed. The volcano that erupted explosively on St Vincent last week has led to many thousands of people being evacuated. Dr Joan Latchman of the University of West Indies Seismic Research Centre - who has monitored Caribbean volcanos for several decades - describes from Trinidad how the layers of ash mean recovery will take a long time, even if the explosions and pyroclastic dangers subside reasonably soon. Back in The UK, Prof Jenni Barclay and colleagues are examining rocks from the early part of the eruption, before the explosive phase began, to see if there are clues in the microstructure that could provide clues to the future. And how do our brains so quickly tell a scream of delight from a scream of horror? Or of pain? Prof Sascha Frühholz of the University of Geneva has written in the journal PLOS Biology this week about work looking at how we identify the nature of different human screams. One finding is that we perceive joy quicker than fear.. (Image: Getty Images) Presenter: Roland Pease Producer: Alex Mansfield
How To Be Happy
Psychology In Hindi Saurabh Gandhi
access_time1 month ago
People usually see happiness as a destination where they will arrive in some distant future. This destination may be a monetary gain, purchasing a house or marrying the partner of your dreams. But whenever someone does reach this place, their happiness moves onto some other destination and the cycle of chasing happiness continues. That's why in this podcast segment we discuss how to be happy and what are those habits that are performed regularly by the happiest people so you can also emulate them and live a better life.
Psychology of Narcissism
Psychology In Hindi Saurabh Gandhi
access_time1 month ago
The word "Narcissism" comes from the Greek myth of a man named "Narcissus" who fell in love with his own image and slowly passed away. Clinical Psychologist Dr. Ramani Durvasula says that Narcissism is a disorder of self-esteem. Which means it doesn't matter how a narcissist presents itself outwardly because inwardly, he/she is really insecure. So, in this podcast segment we'll learn more about this type of behavior, what makes a narcissist, how they gaslight you and how you can get a narcissist to leave you alone.
The equal rights stuff
Discovery BBC
access_time1 month ago
In 1976, Nasa launched a campaign to help recruit the next generation of Astronauts. It was fronted by African-American actress Nichelle Nichols, Star Trek’s Lt. Uhura, as part of an effort to ensure the astronaut corps represented the diversity of the United States. When they were revealed to the press, the 35 members of the new astronaut group included six women, three African American men and one Asian American man. All were appointed on merit. The selection of the first women caused quite a stir. As the ‘first mom in space’, Anna Fisher was asked by the press whether she was worried about her child (none of the fathers were asked). There were also jibes about separate restrooms and whether the women would ‘weep’ if something went wrong. Meanwhile, Nasa’s engineers suggested developing a zero-g makeup kit and the first US woman in space, Sally Ride, was issued with a long string of tampons (joined together like sausages) for a six-day mission. To mark the 40th anniversary of the first Shuttle launch in April 1981, astronaut Nicole Stott speaks to some of these pioneers and hears how Nasa has since aimed to become a beacon for diversity. Contributors also include astronaut Charles Bolden, the first African American to head the space agency and – as Nasa prepares to land the first woman on the Moon – its new head of human spaceflight, Kathy Lueders. (Image: Sally Ride. Credit: Nasa) Producer: Richard Hollingham
Why BOOKS Aren't Enough
Psychology In Hindi Saurabh Gandhi
access_time1 month ago
Books provide us with new knowledge and a reason to think deeply. Whenever we start reading a great book, it transports us into a world of imagination where we can see everything with a different perspective and expand our thinking capabilities. However, if you want to develop yourself holistically, books just aren't enough. In this podcast segment, we expand on this idea and discuss the problems with modern books and what you should replace them with.
On the trail of rare blood clots
The Science Hour BBC
access_time1 month ago
On Wednesday the EU’s EMA and UK’s JCVI announced a suspected correlation between vaccination and an extremely rare type of blood clot. Prof Sabine Eichinger is a co-author of a new paper suggesting a link with vaccination or the immune response to Covid vaccination and suggests the name VIPIT for the condition. One of her patients died at the end of February having presented with a rare combination of symptoms – blood clots and a low blood platelet count. Sabine tells Roland the dots they have managed to join in the story so far. Scientists at Fermilab in the USA posted four papers and announced an exciting development in particle physics that might lift the curtain on science beyond the Standard Model. Their measurement of something known as g-2 (“gee minus two”, just fyi), by measuring with phenomenal accuracy the magnetic properties of muons flying round in circles confirms a 20-year old attempt at a similar value by colleagues at Brookhaven. At the time, it was breathtaking but suspicious. Muons, rather like heavy electrons, don’t quite behave as the Standard Model might have us believe, hinting at fields and possibly particles or forces hitherto unknown. Dr. Harry Cliffe – a member of the LHCb team who found something similarly weird two weeks ago - describes the finding and the level of excitement amongst theorists worldwide. Superfans around the world have learned to speak fluent Klingon, a fictional language originating from Star Trek. In a quest to understand the science behind these languages often dismissed as gobbledygook, Gaia Vince has been speaking to some of the linguists responsible for creating these languages. It’s time for her to relax the tongue, loosen those jaw muscles and wrap her head around the scientific building blocks embedded in language and what languages like Klingon tell us about prehistoric forms of communication. Also, gossip often has negative connotations, but does get a bad rap? Might it serve a useful function and should we think of gossiping as an advanced social skill rather than a personality defect? CrowdScience listener Jayogi thinks it might be useful, and has asked CrowdScience to dig into the reasons why we find it so hard to resist salacious stories. Datshiane Navanayagam meets a scientist who views gossip as a key evolutionary adaption - as humans started to live in bigger cooperative groups, gossiping was a way of bonding and establishing acceptable group behaviour as well as cementing reputations of trustworthiness. Datshiane heads to the local park to catch some real gossiping in action and finds out that whilst people like to gossip they don’t consider themselves gossipers. Datshi asks a team of scientists what information we are most keen to share and glean in these interactions and if there is such a thing as ‘good’ and ‘bad’ gossip. She hears that in some group settings – like in the workplace - gossip can enhance cooperation and limit free-riders, but that it can also have a more self-serving dark side. Datshiane finds out if our stone-age gossipy minds are fit to operate in the world of mass communication and social media – is our fixation on celebrities related to our being hard wired to gossip? Image: Platelets, computer illustration. Credit: Sebastian Kaulitzki /Science Photo Library via Getty Images
3 Signs You Are WASTING Your Life
Psychology In Hindi Saurabh Gandhi
access_time1 month ago
If you look back at your life, you will realize how short and precious it is. Time flows so fast that looking back 10 years in the past feels like all of that happened just yesterday. This is why it is really easy to waste time than to use it efficiently and in this podcast segment, we talk about 3 major signs that will tell you if you are also wasting away your life or using your every minute in an effective and wise manner.
On the trail of rare blood clots
Science in Action BBC
access_time1 month ago
On Wednesday the EU’s EMA and UK’s JCVI announced a suspected correlation between vaccination and an extremely rare type of blood clot. Prof Sabine Eichinger is a co-author of a new paper suggesting a link with vaccination or the immune response to Covid vaccination and suggests the name VIPIT for the condition. One of her patients died at the end of February having presented with a rare combination of symptoms – blood clots and a low blood platelet count. Sabine tells Roland the dots they have managed to join in the story so far. Scientists at Fermilab in the USA posted four papers and announced an exciting development in particle physics that might lift the curtain on science beyond the Standard Model. Their measurement of something known as g-2 (“gee minus two”, just fyi), by measuring with phenomenal accuracy the magnetic properties of muons flying round in circles confirms a 20-year old attempt at a similar value by colleagues at Brookhaven. At the time, it was breathtaking but suspicious. Muons, rather like heavy electrons, don’t quite behave as the Standard Model might have us believe, hinting at fields and possibly particles or forces hitherto unknown. Dr. Harry Cliffe – a member of the LHCb team who found something similarly weird two weeks ago - describes the finding and the level of excitement amongst theorists worldwide. Superfans around the world have learned to speak fluent Klingon, a fictional language originating from Star Trek. In a quest to understand the science behind these languages often dismissed as gobbledygook, Gaia Vince has been speaking to some of the linguists responsible for creating these languages. It’s time for her to relax the tongue, loosen those jaw muscles and wrap her head around the scientific building blocks embedded in language and what languages like Klingon tell us about prehistoric forms of communication. Meanwhile, primatologist Edward Wright of the Max Plank Institute has been hanging out with mountain gorillas in Rwanda and recording the sound of their “chest clapping”. As he describes in the journal Scientific Reports his work confirms what scientists have long suspected - that the famous gesture - often portrayed in films - is a measure of size and strength - allowing communication in the dense, tropical forests in which the animals live. Image: Platelets, computer illustration. Credit: Sebastian Kaulitzki /Science Photo Library via Getty Images Presenter: Roland Pease Producer: Alex Mansfield
5 BAD Habits That DESTROY Your Success
Psychology In Hindi Saurabh Gandhi
access_time1 month ago
There are many habits in your daily routine that are killing the chances of you being successful. Sometimes we act out in a way that is detrimental to ourselves, and that's why in this episode, we talk about 5 bad habits that, if you continue to perform, will destroy your success.
Pierre-Simon Laplace
In Our Time: Science BBC
access_time1 month ago
Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss Laplace (1749-1827) who was a giant in the world of mathematics both before and after the French Revolution. He addressed one of the great questions of his age, raised but side-stepped by Newton: was the Solar System stable, or would the planets crash into the Sun, as it appeared Jupiter might, or even spin away like Saturn threatened to do? He advanced ideas on probability, long the preserve of card players, and expanded them out across science; he hypothesised why the planets rotate in the same direction; and he asked if the Universe was deterministic, so that if you knew everything about all the particles then you could predict the future. He also devised the metric system and reputedly came up with the name 'metre'. With Marcus du Sautoy Simonyi Professor for the Public Understanding of Science and Professor of Mathematics at the University of Oxford Timothy Gowers Professor of Mathematics at the College de France And Colva Roney-Dougal Professor of Pure Mathematics at the University of St Andrews Producer: Simon Tillotson
5 Brain Hacks To Learn Anything Faster
Psychology In Hindi Saurabh Gandhi
access_time1 month ago
To allow your brain to function at a high level doesn't mean that you have to take a course on neurology or become a Buddhist monk. It is about using effective techniques in order to get the most out of your brain. In this podcast segment, we go over 5 such brain hacks/techniques that will teach you how you can learn anything faster, focus and become a better learner.
Lithium: Chile’s white gold
Discovery BBC
access_time1 month ago
The Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 2019 was awarded to John Goodenough, Stanley Whittingham and Akira Yoshino "for the development of lithium-ion batteries." These rechargeable batteries are in our phones, and in our laptops. And they will be the batteries powering electric vehicles which we are being urged to use in place of ones fuelled by gasoline and diesel. Jane Chambers finds out how the element lithium has become so important in the world today. She lives in Chile, where lithium is called the country’s white gold, as it is the source of much of the world’s supply. Jane travels to the Atacama Desert and visits the SQM mine where lithium is evaporated out of huge brine lakes. She talks to Professor Clare Grey of Cambridge University about her research into improving the efficiency of lithium ion batteries. And Dr Paul Anderson of Birmingham University explains what needs to be done for more lithium to be recycled. Editor: Deborah Cohen Picture: Lithium mine in Atacama Desert, Chile, Credit: Jane Chambers
Self Sabotage
Psychology In Hindi Saurabh Gandhi
access_time1 month ago
Self Sabotaging means to do those things that distract you from your goals and where you are hurting yourself. This happens when our subconscious mind interferes with our conscious mind's goals. So, in this podcast segment we will learn how to control our subconscious mind's patterns in order to achieve our desired goals and break our old patterns of self harm/self sabotage.
6 Lessons in Life People Learn TOO LATE
Psychology In Hindi Saurabh Gandhi
access_time1 month ago
To live a good life you have to be able to continuously adapt to new situations and changing times, but most people live their lives on autopilot, and when they finally realize the magnitude of mistakes they have made with them being soo ignorant, it is too late. That's why in this podcast segment, we talk about the life lessons that everybody can learn and apply in their lives to build the foundation for a better future.
Post-Covid outcomes after release from hospital
The Science Hour BBC
access_time1 month ago
After last year’s first wave of covid-19 in the UK, individuals who had been discharged after hospitalisation suffered higher rates of coronary and respiratory disorders, and even diabetes subsequently over 140 days. As Dr Ami Banerjee of University College London explains, out of 48,000 cases, patients who had had acute covid-19 were four times more likely to be readmitted and 8 times more likely to die. Ami’s team suggests in their paper published in the British Medical Journal that diagnosis, treatment and prevention of post-covid syndrome needs an integrated approach. In France, researcher Xavier Montagutelli describes how his team has observed that unlike the original virus, some of the newer Variants of Concern can infect mice in laboratories. They do not show serious illness, but nevertheless host the virus in their lungs. Whilst infection is unlikely in natural environments and not yet observed in the wild, it does show how the viral variants can extend the host range, perhaps leading to more opportunities for mutation. But this finding, posted as a pre-print, also perhaps represents an avenue for deeper gene-specific research that has not so far been possible. Over in Colombia, Monica Carvalho of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute describes her team’s findings regarding the origins of the diversity and habitat of rainforests in south America. Looking at leaf fossils and pollen grains from 60 million years ago, they have found significant differences between the forests of the dinosaurs, and the ones we see today. As they write in the journal Science, it all changed when the Chixulub meteor hit the Gulf of Mexico and the global lights went out. The rainforests that grew back were simply not the same. But much further back in time, some billion years ago, the forests of the world that were changing the chemistry and making seas inhabitable allowing complex multicellular life, consisted of pencil-lead sized algae quietly photosynthesizing in the shallows of an ocean in what is today remote Canada. Katie Maloney of University of Toronto Mississauga spotted fossils of just these when out on a field trip in Yukon territory. Publishing in Geology Magazine this week, her eagle-eyed finds shed light on this crucial epoch in life history of which there are scant fossilized remains. If a tree falls in a forest, and no-one is there to hear it, does it make a sound? This is an age-old debate that listener Richard and his family have been arguing about for years. Can CrowdScience settle it once and for all? Caroline Steel speaks to experts in hearing, biology, philosophy, physics and sound design, which takes her to some unexpected places. Professor Stefan Bleek is an expert in psychoacoustics who says that sounds only exist in our heads. Dr Eleanor Knox and Dr Bryan Roberts are philosophers that make her question if anything exists outside our own perception. Professor Lilach Hadany wonders if it’s limited to humans and animals - could other plants hear the falling tree too? And Mat Eric Hart is a sound designer who says that sound is subjective – it’s always tangled up with our own interpretations. Things get truly weird as we delve into the strange implications of quantum physics. If there is such a thing as reality, doesn’t it change when we’re there to observe it? Does the tree even fall if we aren’t there? Image: Rainforest canopy Credit: Universal Images Group via Getty Images
5 Psychological Tricks Restaurants Use To Make More Money
Psychology In Hindi Saurabh Gandhi
access_time1 month ago
The experience you have in a Fine-Dining restaurant is really different from that of a fast-food joint. In the case of the former, you pay for the experience itself but in latter, only for the food. These restaurants use many techniques and psychological tricks to make you stay for longer, order more things, and pay more. In this podcast segment, we talk about 5 such psychological tricks that will help you understand in what clever ways does a high end restaurant make money off of its customers.