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Anisha Motwani - Raaga.com - A World of Music

Anisha Motwani

24

Episodes

24 Episodes Play All Episdoes
Ep 20: CSR has now become a corporate social regulation as against corporate social responsibility
Storm the Norm
access_time11 days ago
As the world faces multiple crisis, there is an increasing need for corporates to come together and help the civil society. It is equally important to partner with leaders and ensure to bridge the gaps wherever necessary. Our norm this episode is set in this context: Can laws turn corporates into better partners for the society at large? Or will they turn CSR into Corporate Social Regulation rather than Corporate Social Responsibility? Find out as we storm this norm in Ep. 21
Ep 20: The Future belongs to the Fast
Storm the Norm
access_time2 months ago
This norm—that the future belongs to the fast—feels as old as time itself. Aesop articulated it with the fable of the hare and the tortoise. Pioneers throughout time became rulers by being the first to get somewhere, or to conquer new lands. In business, we’ve had the idea of the first-mover advantage for a long time. And in a frenzied, VC-fueled new economy, it definitely feels like you’re a loser if you’re not the first out of the blocks. Undoubtedly, social, economic, political, cultural laws shape us. Isn’t that why fast does seem to be winning, and defining the future? Look all around us. That’s what we seem to celebrate. The fastest to become a billionaire, a unicorn, to market. The fastest finger on quiz shows, the fastest to a T20 century in cricket, and the search is on now to see who will be faster than Usain “Lightning” Bolt & Nishant Shetty. The Annual Special episode, highlighted the juxtaposition of fast and slow, and how the pandemic made us involuntarily choose slow by putting life on pause. Now’s as good a time as any to examine if that was just a blip or if this norm—that the future belongs to the fast—can be, must be stormed. And to do that, we have perhaps the best spokesperson for Slow in the country today. Neelesh Misra is an award-winning journalist and entrepreneur. He’s famously popular and popularly famous for his radio stories on Yaadon ka Idiot Box. He’s the founder of the path-breaking grassroots journalism platform, Gaon Connection. And his newest baby is the Slow Movement, an amalgamation of three verticals, Slow content, Slow food and Slow experiences. For GT Insights, Pallavi Joshi Bakhru shares the key guidelines to build a framework for companies that are on their good to great journey and in believe in business with purpose.
Ep 19: 2021 will be about norming storms, not storming norms
Storm the Norm
access_time4 months ago
In August 2020, this story about the Choluteca Bridge in Honduras went viral and made many a LinkedIn profile get their 15 seconds of fame. Funnily enough, the bridge was built in 1996, Hurricane Mitch forced the river to change course in 1998 to completely render the bridge useless from the point of its original purpose. But it took a year-long pandemic in 2020 for people to realize that we had all been building our own Bridges to Nowhere while the river of life dramatically changed course. Clearly, 2020 is our Hurricane Mitch. And 2021 is the year where we figure out what to do with the Bridge to Nowhere. Remember, Lewis Carroll’s iconic ‘Through the Looking Glass’. The cusp between 2020 and 2021 feels like we all need to step through a looking glass of our own, to see our world anew. With the advent of work / live / play at home era, the impossibility to plan in advance has erased the concept of chronos (as the ancient Greeks called it) or linear time. And because of that, we looked for our identity in the past. As many experts say, yearning—especially in moments of uncertainty—can be really grounding. And it is this fusion of past and future that gives us five hacks to norm the storms of 2020 as we step into 2021.
Nationalistic brands will have an edge over global brands in the post-Covid era.
Storm the Norm
access_time5 months ago
This norm may sound pretty obvious—and familiar, because it is an inescapable one these days, given the socio-political climate, not just in India but in many countries across the world. Recall the Donald Trump’s MAGA ideology that almost demanded a nationalistic fervor from business (the integrity of that ideology is another debate altogether), Brexit has asked Britons to view business from a non-EU lens first. Even in something as critical as a Covid-19 vaccine, the US wants to favor the one developed by an American company (Pfizer, in this case) while India has its predilections towards the ones where Bharat Biotech or The Serum Institute have a hand. So, will local geo-politics influence businesses & will brands start being vocal about showing off their nationalistic credentials and make that a key strategic pillar in their playbook? To answer this, we have an expert who has straddled the line between both local and global. Our guest expert today is Geetu Verma from Unilever, a global marketer and business leader, part of Unilever's global Foods and Refreshment team based out of Rotterdam, Netherlands.
Nationalistic brands will have an edge over global brands in the post-Covid era.
Storm the Norm
access_time5 months ago
This norm may sound pretty obvious—and familiar, because it is an inescapable one these days, given the socio-political climate, not just in India but in many countries across the world. Recall the Donald Trump’s MAGA ideology that almost demanded a nationalistic fervor from business (the integrity of that ideology is another debate altogether), Brexit has asked Britons to view business from a non-EU lens first. Even in something as critical as a Covid-19 vaccine, the US wants to favor the one developed by an American company (Pfizer, in this case) while India has its predilections towards the ones where Bharat Biotech or The Serum Institute have a hand. So, will local geo-politics influence businesses & will brands start being vocal about showing off their nationalistic credentials and make that a key strategic pillar in their playbook? To answer this, we have an expert who has straddled the line between both local and global. Our guest expert today is Geetu Verma from Unilever, a global marketer and business leader, part of Unilever's global Foods and Refreshment team based out of Rotterdam, Nethelands.
Challenger brands have to swim harder than the leader to stay in the same place
Storm the Norm
access_time6 months ago
What are the rules of winning for challenger brands? But first, what makes a challenger brand? What differentiates them from market followers & qualifies them as challengers? Let's take a cricket analogy here. The 1983 men’s Indian cricket team was an underdog that came from nowhere to dethrone an invincible West Indies. But there is another more apt team when it comes to satisfying multiple conditions of being a true challenger. The Sri Lankan team of the 1996 cricket world cup. They were a decided underdog, much smaller as a cricketing nation, in the midst of the worst days of the civil war and they definitely did not stay in the same place at the end of the tournament. What is amply clear is that it’s high time the ‘challenger brand’ norm was stormed. We do have an expert who brings his lived insights and experience with him — on what it takes to be a challenger brand and not end up in the same place. Listen to Mr. Vishesh C. Chandiok, CEO of Grant Thornton Bharat to shed light on this & more. Don’t miss the #StN Innovation #Hacks to help you change your game
StN Ep 16 Indian boards are more statutory than strategic, in the bargain ending up as rubber stamps
Storm the Norm
access_time8 months ago
What really makes for a great board? The turn of the century saw the collapse of Enron, Worldcom, Tyco, Adelphia, 2008 saw the collapse of Lehman Brothers. They all had boards with great experience, diversity, equity involvement, independence, and they all oversaw governance as well as strategy. Closer home, we’ve seen the tussles in the past few years in two of the most iconic Indian companies—Tata Sons and Infosys. We take this norm head-on with the leading subject matter expert on Board Governance, Mr. Shailesh Haribhakti. We asked him—much like how it’s asked of journalism: who will watch the watchers—what governs the ones tasked with governance? And as expected, he didn’t just make sense. He gave a rousing rallying cry and pointed unequivocally towards the direction Indians boards need to take, and what it takes to be a successful board.
STN EP 15: Traditional media businesses & their traditional revenue models are doomed
Storm the Norm
access_time9 months ago
The irony of this norm is that it’s staring at us, but that change seems to be so long in coming, when the norm has been actually crying out to be stormed!! The traditional media industry may not acknowledge it, but as Einstein once said, doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results is the definition of insanity…and not in a good way. The problem with this industry is that they have allowed themselves to be defined by the medium and not the purpose. They’re called the media business, not the journalism business or news & analysis, or reportage. When you pigeonhole yourself like that, then you’ll tend to be defined—both from inside and externally—by whatever the fashionable technology is these days. For centuries, print was it, then along came audio-visual media such as radio and television, and now we have the 21st century’s posterchild, digital. But media—any of these—are just that. They’re just the technological platforms, they’re not the product. And when you let yourself be defined by a medium, then of course your revenue models are going to be constrained by that myopic thinking. So can this norm be stormed? Well, to take a crack at it, we roped in Mr. Anurag Batra, Chairman, and Editor-in-Chief of BW Businessworld. Anurag is a media mogul, serial entrepreneur, journalist, and an eternal optimist. Given his multi-faceted set of experiences, we figured we couldn’t have gotten a better expert to storm this norm.
StN Ep-14 Indian Start-Up ecosystem is at best a clone of its global counterparts
Storm the Norm
access_time9 months ago
At a time when the Indian Government is ruthlessly banning Chinese apps and pushing the Indian Start-up eco-system to raise their game, the question really is, "Are we ready to take the challenge"? It's well known that most Indian startups are prone to emulate successful global ideas, by and large fine-tuning an existing model to serve local needs. There’s Ola for Uber, Gaana for Spotify, OYO Rooms for Airbnb, and Flipkart for Amazon. So while India has provided for a nurturing ground to numerous startups in the past few years but they are merely clones of Western ideas. To storm this very pertinent norm we have none other than GV Ravishankar, who is a Managing Director of Sequoia Capital India. GV’s specific focus areas are the Consumer, Financial Services, and Education sectors. Two of the most interesting Indian start-ups GV works with are Byju’s and Rebel Foods. A President’s Gold Medal awardee from IIM Ahmedabad, GV’s experience spans many years with Wipro Technologies and then McKinsey & Company in senior advisory roles.
STN EPISODE 13- Indian Brands Don’t Have What It Takes To Succeed Globally
Storm the Norm
access_time10 months ago
Indian executives have always succeeded spectacularly on the global stage. Sundar Pichai, Satya Nadella, Ajay Banga, Indra Nooyi, Rajesh Suri, Shantanu Narayen, Rakesh Kapoor The list is long. And yet, we'd be hard put to name even 5 Indian businesses that have similarly succeeded on a global scale. Why is that? What will it take for Indian brands to win on the global stage? How can businesses storm this norm? We have just the right person to answer these tough questions Tune in to listen to Mr. Mohit Malhotra, young & passionate CEO of our very own home-grown global Indian conglomerate, Dabur. This is a person who’s been there, done that in storming this norm, alright.
Podcast Episode 12 Final
Storm the Norm
access_time11 months ago
COVID 19 has exposed the vulnerabilities of rigid supply chains and has heightened the need to circumvent existing supply chain limitations, cut the cost and time to reach customers, and figure out ways to generate more value—for customers and for themselves. Multi-channel distribution eco-system, ‘just-in-time’ delivery, customer’s expectation of personalization, coupled with demand volatility has resulted in complex but highly in-efficient supply chains. Time is ripe to evolve to the next normal by storming the rigidity norms of the existing supply chain eco-system. Listen to some path-breaking insights in this new episode of our podcast.
Episode 11: Can you ever create a business plan for DE-GROWTH?
Storm the Norm
access_time1 year ago
Business plans have always been created for Growth. We all know that the single biggest lynchpin of progress—whether after crises or in regular times, whether in the world at large or in the world of business—is the pursuit of growth. Right now, obviously we’re seeing the opposite of growth and this is the right time to pause & reflect on our norm for this episode. Is the relentless pursuit of growth, the only way for business to progress? Can we create a business plan for DE-GROWTH & yet advance? Listen in and share your views
STN EP- 09: Is Success The Result of Constant Activity, Not Quiet Meditation?
Storm the Norm
access_time1 year ago
Everywhere around us, the world is in turmoil. And perhaps the answer to still this turmoil is not at a global or even at a collective level, but at an individual level. What does it take to succeed in a disruptive world? We will explore it at an individual level and not just at a business level. The norm—and it seems so true intuitively as well as in lived experiences—is this: Success is the result of constant activity, not quiet meditation. Listen to Anisha Motwani and Narayan Devanathan storm the norm with Anil Chandwani, a globally renowned meditation mentor, clinical hypnotherapist and serial entrepreneur in this week's Storm The Norm
STN EP- 08: Does form always follow function?
Storm the Norm
access_time1 year ago
How do you define form and function? Are they synonymous with style and substance? Do they change based on individual characteristics and contexts (of people and businesses)? Do they vary based on mediums of expression? Do they change over time? Is form only about expression? Is function only about utility? In this episode of Storm The Norm, Anisha Motwani and Narayan Devanathan continue to dissect, analyse and interpret existing norms to decipher what's the new norm!
STN EP - 07: IT'S NOT JUST A CAR, IT'S A DREAM
Storm the Norm
access_time1 year ago
This norm is going to sound very basic, very simplistic even, but there’s a very profound truth underneath—one that is the unquestioned norm, or at least, has been so far. We are talking about the ownership of cars. Especially in a country like India, it’s both the norm and the aspiration, isn’t it? It’s why the car industry is a bellwether for the economy itself. It’s why a slowdown in car sales has economists and the public alarmed. But there’s something a lot more personal in owning a car. It’s an aspiration, identity and transportation all rolled into one. Everyone who can dream of owning a car. In that simple statement, though, we see two norms, not just one. The idea of ownership—having something in your permanent possession, and the specific idea of owning a car. That’s never going to change, or is it?
STN EP7: Business & Politics should ideally never mix
Storm the Norm
access_time1 year ago
Think about it. Business & Politics have kind of been on opposite sides on many counts. • Politics is right-brained/ emotional & business is left-brained and factual. • Politics is raw and rough. Business is structured and organized. • Politics is ideology-based & business is ideology-agnostic. But increasingly, business and politics can’t seem to stay away from each other. Very visible issues today impact how businesses run, how they present themselves to the world. What we are seeing now is (a) it’s easier for the public to see where the two are mixing, and (b) that visibility is making it apparent that businesses can longer get away from being shallow in living up to the purpose.
EP - 06a: 5#STN Fundas to transition from a successful Professional to a winning Entrepreneur
Storm the Norm
access_time2 years ago
I am sure there was a lot to absorb from what Ashish Bhasin said about ‘How do you become a successful entrepreneurial professional?’ But, Ashish is a bit of an exception. What’s a little rarer are successful professional CEOs who make entrepreneurs. Not long-standing corporate leaders who are entrepreneurial in a monolithic organization but those who venture out of successful corporates to become entrepreneurs. Falguni Nayar who founded Nykaa after a successful career as a banker is a great example of that. Sameer Bhatia, ex-Citibank who founded Equifax credit bureau in India is another. Here are the Five # STN Fundas to give to our audience on what stars to align for this?
EP 06:Professional CEOs can never make successful entrepreneurs.
Storm the Norm
access_time2 years ago
There are those of us who, even as kids, would see a puddle and jump into it. Or see a red button and press it to see what would happen. And then there are those of us who wait to see what happens when that other kid presses the red button and then decide what's the prudent thing to do & that's the defining trait that continues to separate grown-ups and whether they become professionals or entrepreneurs.
EP 05a :Five STN Fundas to transform your IDEAS INTO INNOVATION
Storm the Norm
access_time2 years ago
Powerful Innovation is rarely a random idea that emanates from a casual brainstorming session or a bright spark in the middle of the night. If you don't understand the difference between ideas and innovation, it is unlikely that your idea will end up with a transformative innovation aimed at solving a real problem. Just follow the 5 #STN Fundas to put your IDEA through the INNOVATION FILTER and avoid making a mistake..because failed initiatives are expensive at several levels of business.
EP 04: How to use the obvious to create innovation that solves real problems
Storm the Norm
access_time2 years ago
In part one of this episode, we had highlighted the 3 A’s—ambiguity, agony and apathy as three key levers. The questions to ask is: from ambiguity to what? From agony to what? From apathy to what? The answers seem fairly obvious when we ask the questions. From ambiguity to clarity. From agony to ecstasy. From apathy to empathy. The overarching question that remains is—how do we go about it, with the canvas of the obvious? Listen in..
EP - 04 : Innovation comes from exploring the edges, outliers & extremities.
Storm the Norm
access_time2 years ago
In this episode, we take up a very fundamental question: What is the most fertile source of innovation? The norm is that innovation comes from the edges of what is known, from the outliers. In exploring how to storm this norm, we roped in Santosh Desai, cultural expert, social commentator, brand and business builder and a thought-provoking person (not just a thoughtful person or thought leader) in general. The conversation was, as expected, extremely thought-provoking while being elementary at one level. In this episode, we’ll talk about what other canvas there is for innovation, what conditions are needed to even recognize and prepare that canvas, and what prevents us from looking beyond the norm.
Episode 3: Family CEOs in family businesses have it easier than professional CEOs.
Storm the Norm
access_time2 years ago
That’s the common perception, isn’t it? That family run businesses benefit family members with superior incentives and lesser hindrances, and so it’s easier for them. Let me add a key statistic here about why this is an important norm to storm for anyone in business: By one estimate, 90% of all businesses in India are family-run businesses, from the ubiquitous kirana stores to multi-industry conglomerates. Now that I think about it, you recognize so many big names that are family-owned businesses: The Birlas, Tatas, Godrej, Parle, the Biyanis, Premjis, Nadars. This does seem like a fairly universal norm. But there seems to be more to this norm than meets the eye.
Podcast Series | Episode 2
Storm the Norm
access_time2 years ago
Anti-incumbency is an unstoppable mega force
Podcast Series | Episode 1
Storm the Norm
access_time2 years ago
If you are too big to fail, you are too big to disrupt. What does it take to rewire for success in a disruptive world? Why Storm the Norm in the first place? What’s wrong with the norm? And is there any formula to Storming the Norm? These are the questions Narayan Devanathan & I will explore and explode in our brand new fortnightly podcast series, taking different norms across the business landscape to see how businesses can rewire to succeed in a disruptive landscape. In our debut episode, we talk about a Big Daddy norm. It’s one of the oldest pieces of received wisdom: if you’re too big to fail, you’re probably too big to disrupt. We were nervous first-timers but also had a really good time storming this norm. Give us a listen & we would love it if you can share it with your friends & colleagues and give us your feedback and comments. And follow us for our fortnightly episodes: https://soundcloud.com/stormthenorm
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